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CURRENT SAUCE 



LXIV, No. 1 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 



NATCHITOCHES. LOUISIANA 



September 7, 1976 



(inguished Lecture Series 



George Gallup speaks on Thursday 



by Ken Landry 

jjorge Gallup Jr., public opinion 
^archer and president of The Gallup 
I will kick off the 1976-77 
iinguished Lecture Series Thursday 
^. 9 at 9:30 a. m. in the A. A. Fre- 
jjclts Fine Arts Center Auditorium. 

jallup Poll which is recognized as 
( of the nation's most precise public 
jion surveys has played an im- 
-ant role in the weighing of public 
jjion during this election year. In 
;S the Gallup Poll accurately 
■dieted the outcome of that 
sidential election. 

•allup, who was graduated from 
uceton University in 1953 has 
ieA in all phases of polling 
(rations. From 1953-63 he was 
jervisor of questionnaire design, 
jap became editor in 1963, a position 
iich he held until he became presid- 
of Gallup Poll in 1966. 

jallup has membership on the Ad- 
;ry Council of the Department of 
dology of Princeton University and 
iMarket Research Council of New 
i City. He is also on the Board of 
sectors for the Roper Opinion 
search Center at Williams College, 
jgion in America Life, Inc., Quill 
i Scroll Honorary Journalism 
ciety, the Gilbert and Sullivan 
sedation of Princeton, N. J. 

iiup is co-author with John Davies 
What My People Think," a church 
Tty manual and with Carl Kavalage 

i soon-to-be-published book on the 
1 presidential campaign. 

ii addition to these two books Gallup 
i written magazine articles on 
<&l methods, religion, urban 
"A'ans, voting behavior of various 
ips in population. Currently he is 
% on a book dealing with the 
-itual climate in the U. S. 



Listed in the 1974 edition of Who's 
Who in America. Gallup is also a 
member of AAPOR (American 
Association of Public Opinion 
Research), and WAPOR (World 

Association of Public Opinion 
Research). He is an Honorary "Ken- 
tucky Colonel" and former chairman of 
the Board of Advisors of the Stuart 
Country Cay School of the Sacred 
Heart. 

While at Princeton, Gallup played 



four years of soccer and was Secretary 
of the Princeton Soccer Association. He 
has played soccer with various semi- 
pro teams and coached for two years at 
the Lawrenceville School. 

Gallup lives in Princeton, N. J. He is 
45 years old, married and has three 
children. 

Future guest lecturers will be Joseph 
Fletcher professor of biomedical ethics 
at the University of Virginia School of 
Medicine. He will speak at 9 a. m. Oct. 




GEORGE GALLUP— Internationally know pollster George 
Gallup will appear at NSU Thursday. An appearance by Mr. 
Gallup should prove to be interesting in a presidential election 
year when great emphasis is being placed on each candidates 
strengths and weaknesses according to the polls. 



8. Fletcher is the author of several 
books on social and medical ethics with 
his most recent being "The Ethics of 
Genetic Control: Ending Reproductive 
Roulette." 

Appearing at 2 p. m. Oct. 14 will be U. 
S. Sen. W. Brooke of Massachuetts. 
Currently Brooke is a member of the 
Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs 
Committee, Appropriations Com- 
mittee, Select Committee on Standards 
and Conduct, Special Committee on 
Aging and the Joint Committee on 
Defense Production. 

Dr. Irene Kassorha, internationally- 
known psychologist, lecturer, author 
and television personality who is 
recognized as one of the leading 
authorities on the treatment of 
childhood schizophrenia will address an 
assembly at 9 a. m. Feb. 11. 

"CBS Morning News" anchorman 
Hughes Rudd will speak at 10 a. m. 
Mar. 7. Rudd who has been with CBS 
since 1959 has covered events around 
the world. Prior to assuming anchor 
responsibilities in 1973 on the daily 
broadcast he served as CBS Moscow 
correspondent and Bonn-Berlin 
correspondent. 

Rounding out the lecture series will 
be Marilyn Van Derbur. Since her 
selection as Miss America in 1958, she 
has become a proven television and 
radio personality and accomplished 
speaker. She has hosted more than 23 
network television specials on CBS and 
NBC. Mrs. Van Derbur will speak at 11 
a. m. April 19. 

Tommy Whitehead, Department of 
Curriculum and Instruction and 
cnairman of the lecture series, said all 
lecture programs are open to the public 
and there will be no admission charged. 



by Marvin L. Horton 

ill students and Natchitoches 
■ais celebrated school spirit and the 
Nag of the Fall semester during 
»eek of Aug. 23-28 with numerous 
ptttt. 

^events included a Howdy Dance, 
k SBA night, and Demon Day 
<jj highlighted the week long 
•Cities. 

"ie Howdy Dance friends were re- 
& and new acquaintances were 
fe&s students danced to the tune of 

— Featuring Billy Pendleton." 

a form of family reunion for 

e "Eiger Sanction" starring Clint 
**ood and Goerge Kennedy was 
"Ho a packed house in the Arts and 
"tes Auditorium. This was the first 
many films mat will be shown 
¥iout the semester under the 
^ion of the Student Union 
ir «ing Board. 

; A »ith the assistance of Saga Food 
^ sponsored a dinner on Chaplins 
*■ SBA Vice President David 
introduced Head Football 
* A. L. Williams who introduced 
Members of his staff. The Demon 



football team members then personally 
introduced themselves to students 
before moving over to the practice field 
for their first full scrimmage. As 
hundreds of NSU students and local 
residents watched enthusiastically, the 
NSU Cheerleaders boosted the Demons 
on to a successful scrimmage. 

"Demon Day" was the climax of the 
week long activities and was sponsored 
by Northwestern State University, the 
Natchitoches Parish Chamber of 
Commerce, the NSU Demon Booster 
Club and the Natchitoches chapter of 
Northwestern Alumni Association. 
Natchitoches residents sat aside this 
day to express appreciation for 
cultural, economic, financial, and the 
educational contributions made to the 
community by NSU. 

A resolution proclaiming "Demon 
Day" in Natchitoches was issued by 
Mayor Bobby DeBlieux and Nat- 
chitoches Chamber of Commerce. 

"Northwestern State University and 
its student body are important assets to 
this community," DeBlieux and 
president Coley Gahagan of the Nat- 
chitoches Parish Chamber of Com- 




hL^ASN'T IT BILLY— Billy Pendleton, a recent graduate of 

C* stern ' and Ws band ' " Earth ". performed before a large 
i^f students at the annual "Demon Disco Party." The Dance 

C ri !l erly known as ***** "Howdy Dance" The dance was 
v Jed by the Student Union Governing Board, and was one of 
i activities held during the first week of school to coincide 
* bectic registration week. 



merce stated. "There has always 
existed a close cooperation between the 
university and the citizens of Nat- 
chitoches." 

The day long activities began at 10 a. 
m. Saturday. The NSU band divided 
voluntarily into three sections at 2 p. m. 
at Broadmoor Shopping Center and 
Dixie Plaza Shopping Center in East 
Natchitoches and at Exchange Bank 
and Trust Company in downtown 
Natchitoches. Natchitoches radio 
station KNOC and KDBH carried live 
remote broadcasts from all three 
locations 

While the band entertained the 
crowd, cheerleaders and members of 
other campus organization gave out 
over 3,000 orange bumper stickers 
which read "NSU: '76-year of the 
Demon." Also, during the day over 
$1000 was contributed to the athletic 
program of NSU. 

Before rain caused the cancellation of 



Hot Sauce 

Who gets the money that we pay at 
registration for "Studen t 
Association Fees?" 

"The amount of money charged for 
the Student Association Fees is voted on 
by the student body and can be found in 
the SBA Constitution," according to Dr. 
Richard Galloway, Vice President of 
Student Affairs. 

As stated in the constitution, "The 
general Student Association Fee shall 
be $39.75 for the fall semester allocated 
as follows: Potpourri, $10.00; 
CURRENT SAUCE, $2.00; Student 
Drama Activities, $.75; Student Union 
Program Fee, $6.50; Recreation 
Facility Fund, $15.00; Union Board 
Drama fee, $1.00; Student Government 
Activity fee, $2.75; Alumni Dues, $.50; 
KNWD, $.50; Artist Series, $.75." 

Of the $2.75 allocated to Student 
Government, the constitution provides 
that $1.50 be used for the operation of 
the Student Government Association, 
$.25 be put into a reserve fund, and that 
$1.00 be used for the Distinguished 
Lecture Series. 



the River Front dance and activities the 
Entertainers of NSU performed for 
thirty minutes. Magenta, a well-known 
rock group from Baton Rouge, did not 
perform because of the rain. Time was 
not available to move to Prather 
Coliseum. 

Dr. C. B. Ellis, assistant to the 
president of NSU, director of the Office 
of External Affairs and coordinator of 
Demon Day activities said, "Season 
Tickets are going better than ever and 
the towns people are behind the Demon 
football team for '76." 

Assisting Ellis and his staff with the 
planning of activities were Jim Pierson 
president of the Natchitoches chapter 
of NSU Alumni Association, Wayne 
McCullen, Demon Booster Club 
president; Rory Alexander president of 
the SUGB; Clinton Davis president of 
NSU Student Body Association; Mayor 
DeBlieux and Gahagan of the Nat- 
chitoches Chamber of Commerce. 




NEW REGISTRATION SAVES TIME?— These advisors appear 
to be telling this bewildered student, "Go to the end of the line, go 
directly to the end of the line, do not pass go, do not collect $200." 

Registration is complete 



Demon Day highlights week of activities 



By JESSIE M. NIPP 

New registration policies and the 
reasons for their implementation were 
revealed last Friday by Walter P. 
Ledet, NSU Registrar. 

Ledet stated that the State Board of 
Trustees, at its called meeting on Jan. 
20, voted to equalize registration char- 
ges for every college under its 
jurisdiction. 

Included in the standardized fees 
are: 

1. A $5 application fee for admission 
or readmission of a student who is a U. 
S. citizen. 

2. A $15 application fee for admission 
or readmission of a foreign student. 

3. Non-resident fees of $25 per 
semester hour (in addition to all other 
fees) for out-of-state students. 

4. A $15 late registration fee for 
registering after official close of 
registration. 

5. A fee of $5 per card for processing 
drop-add cards, PLUS $5 per hour for 
each hour added above the number of 
hours of the student's original 
registration. For example, if a student 
elects to drop 3 hours and add 3 hours, a 
fee of $5 will be assesed for processing 
the card. If, however, the student 
chooses to pursue all the hours for 



which he or she is registered and to add 
1 or more hours, a fee of $5 will be char- 
ged for processing the card plus $5 per 
hour for each hour added. 

Ledet pointed out that Student 
Association fees, which are self- 
assessed, and certain other fees such as 
Dining Hall fees, which are assessed on 
the basis of local contracts, may vary 
slightly from one university to another. 

Ledet also stated that it costs $15 to 
process an application for admission, 
according to a study conducted at NSU. 
In the past, as many as 4000 new ap- 
plications have been received and 
processed in a semester, to have 
perhaps only 1200 of the students ac- 
tually enroll. It is hoped that the $5 
application fee will help to limit ap- 
plications to students who are sincerely 
interested in enrolling at NSU. 

According to Ledet, a second policy 
change involving payment of fees at the 
time of registration is necessary 
because many students have failed to 
pay their fees after registration. A 
student is not officially enrolled until all 
fees are paid, Ledet emphasized. 
Collecting fees at the time of 
registration will eliminate confusion as 
to whether or not a student is, in fact, 
enrolled. 



Theatre holds open Auditions 



If you have ever performed in a high 
school play, or even if you have no 
performance experience but would like 
to try it, the University Players invite 
you to the Open Auditions to be held 
September 9 beginning at 5 p. m. in the 
NSU Little Theatre. 

The NSU Theatre belongs to you. 
When you paid your fees, you bought 
your season ticket to attend all the 
productions. You also have the right to 
participate in them. Even if you are 
more interested in sewing or painting 
or any of a number of other things, 
come anyway — the theatre has a place 
for you. 

Anyone who attends these auditions is 
eligible for membership in University 
Players. 

If you have any special talent, or if 



Lady of the Bracelet 



Entries for the Lady of the Bracelet 
pageant opened September 1. Entries 
will be taken through September 22. 

The LOB pageant is an annual event 
sponsored by the Student Union 
Governing Board. Betty Williamson is 
executive chairman of the pageant and 
her assistant co-chairmen are Darlene 
Damico and Ann Bates. 

The acceptance tea will be held Sept. 
27, preliminaries will be held Oct. 16 
and the actual pageant will take place 



Nov. 17 at 8 p. m. in the Fine Arts 
Auditorium. 

The theme of this year's pageant, 
suggested by the reigning Miss Nor- 
thwestern State University Lady of the 
Bracelet, Cheryl Purcell, is "Imagine." 

Interested persons should fill out the 
entry blank and return it to Room 214 of 
the Student Union. Any questions 
should be directed to Betty Williamson, 
Ann Bates or Darlene Damico. 



"Lady of the Bracelet" Entry Form 



NAME- 



ADDRESS ( DORMITORY OR STREET )- 
PHONE 



ORGANIZATION OR DORMITORY- 



ALL ENTRIES MUST BE IN BY SEPT. 22 1976. 



you are just interested in theatre for 
recreation, come to these auditions for 
you may have the chance to be cast in 
any of the season's major productions 
as well as several student-directed one 
act plays throughout the year. 

Our first major production of the 
season is "Who's Happy Now?," Oct. 
13-16. This production will be taken to 
Baton Rouge as the entry in the 
Louisiana Division of the American 
College Theatre Festival. 

The second show scheduled is a 
reader's theatre presentation called 
"The Eye Alone." to be performed Nov. 
10-13 in St. Denis Cafeteria. In the 
Spring, Shakespeare's "Twelfth 
Night," and the musical "Plain and 
Fancy" are scheduled. 



Five years ago this month in Current 
Sauce: Richard Galloway was ap- 
pointed Dean of Students, and advisor 
of the Student Body Association; State 
Senator J. Bennett Johnston, Jr. rode 
through Natchitoches in a motorcade, 
and urged students to register to vote; 
Folk-blues singer Josh White, Jr. ap- 
peared in concert as part of "Showcase 
71"; Applications were open for one 
male cheerleader; Patti Miller and 
"Dandelion Wine" performed at the 
Purple Light Coffee House; Bobby 
DeBlieux was running for mayor, and 
had. an ad in Current Sauce reading 
"Want someone to fight for NSU - Elect 
Robert "Bobby" DeBlieux Mayor; a 
letter to the editor criticized the dining 
hall policy; Jimmie Davis was running 
for governor; SGA officers were Lynn 
Killen, Roddy Dye, Charlotte 
Broussard, Mark Hanna, Bobby 
Harling, and Vicki Hebert; plans were 
-being made for a Nitty Gritty Dirt Band 
concert; Senator George McGovern 
was scheduled as a Distinguished 
Lecturer; A research and development 
committee was set up to study the 
feasibility of a recreation complex for 
Northwestern; Bessie Brock was 
Editor of Current Sauce; and Billy Jack 
| was^lavmg^itJjheDon^^^^^^^^ 



i - 




+ - 



Page 2 CURRENT SAUCE September 7, 1976 



f Co 's Corner 



i my 

Sometimes 
\ comments 



S My name is Colette Old- 
I mixon and at times I am 
\ known as "Co." I am editor of 
£ this publication— Current 
:: Sauce— and have ordained 
that this niche be reserved for 
editorial comment, 
there will be 
on student 
; government, people, places 
: and-or events. At other times 
I general tidbits of information 
swill be passed on to you, the 
: reader, for the perusal. There 

• is almost no way of predicting 
swhat you might read in "Co's 
sCorner." 

Believe It 

* As many of you may or may 
not know, Saturday, August 
28, was set aside by the city of 
Natchitoches as "Demon 
|)ay." Through the untiring 
Efforts of Dr. C.B. "Lum" 
Ellis, the members of the 
External Affairs office, 
members of the SBA, SUGB, 
Purple Jackets, Blue Key, the 
Demon Marching band, the 
twirlers, ROTC, and the many 
citizens of Natchitoches, 
hundreds of bumper stickr 
stickers proclaiming "NSU '76 
year of the demons!" and 
football schedules were 



passed out. 

Dr. Kilpatrick and his wife, 
Coach A.L. Williams and 
Coach the many important 
people who came by one of the 
three locations— A & P, 
Brookshires or Exchange 
Bank and Trust Co.— to help 
make Demon Day a big 
success. From the enthusiasm 
that radiated from students' 
faces as they talked on the 
radio and stuck those stickers, 
I believe the Demons will have 
many such staunch supporters 
this season. 

Here are a couple of believe 
it or nots for Ripley. The first 
is the fact that I am writing an 
editorial, something 1 never 
thought I'd do. The second is 
the fact that though the SBA 
did not meet as an entire body 
this summer, they were not 
dormant. 

Under the direction of 
Clinton Davis, president of 
SBA, and Debbie Hawkins, 
secretary for the association, 
the calendar of Campus 
events and the booklet of 
coupons which were 
distributed during regist- 
ration were compiled. 

Through Dr. Galloway's 



GO WESTERN WITH US!! 

The Hitchin' 
Post 

WESTERN STORE 

•BOOTS 
•JEANS 

•HATS 
•BELTS hwy.i SOUTH 

352-7042 
Hours • 9:30 to 5:30 




i 

office, Davis was in- 
strumental in initiating a new 
policy concerning Chaplin's 
Lake. Before the summer 
break, SBA advocated several 
of the changes adopted. 

The new policy provides 
that NSU students may fish, 
picnic, sunbathe, and 
generally enjoy the lake ex- 
cept for the area directly in 
front of President Kilpatrick's 
home. Litter barrels have 
been strategically placed 
along the lake. 

The SBA supported Senate 
Bill 492 introduced by Senator 
Armand Brinkhaus. Senate 
Bill 492 would have allowed 
the sale of alcoholic beverages 
on campus. 

Davis had telegrams sent to 
key committee people in the 
Louisiana House of 
Representatives and the 
Senate. Letters signed by 
Davis, Daivid Walker, the 
SBA's vice president, and Bob 
Ryder, the SBA's senate 
chairman, were sent to all 
senators and several 
representatives in the House. 

Ryder, who was in Baton 
Rouge at the time, lobbied for 
the bill in the Senate. He 
credits Rodney Harrington, 
Don Kelly's legislative aide, 
and former SBA president, 
and Mike Martinez, lobbyist 
for the Louisiana Student 
Lobby, as being helpful during 
the campaign for passage of 
the bill. 

The bill passed in the Senate 
but when brought to the House 
it was defeated. 

I hope that the SB A will keep 
up the good work they have 
begun. 



HOLY HILL? — SGA passed a bill 
unanimously last week urging 
President Arnold Kilpatrick to look 
into the road maintenance problem 
on campus. This picture is one of 
several holes in the road at Greek 



Hill. Other areas in dire need of 
maintenance include the sidewalk 
behind Natchitoches Dorm. For 
more information on this and other 
issues discussed at last weeks SGA 
meeting see next weeks paper. 



Instant hysteria reigns 



by Bob Ryder 

What happens when a 
Current Sauce staff member 
or reporter finds out that his 
deadline has been moved up to 
Tuesday afternoon instead of 
Thursday afternoon? Nothing 
— unless they don't find out 
until Monday afternoon. When 
that happens the result is 
mass confusion and hysteria ! 

This situation occured last 
week, while many of the Curr- 
ent Sauce staff members and 
reporters were preparing to p- 
ut together their first paper. 
Usually, Current Sauce story 
deadline for reporters is 
Wednesday afternoon at 5 
p.m. This gives the staff until 
Thursday afternoon to copy 
edit the stories, and lay out the 
pages. On Friday afternoon all 
copy is sent down to the 
Natchitoches Times. Then, 
after a weekend of rest, 



"WELCOME BACK NSU STUDENTS" 
t 




"We have Books, Bibles, 
Gibson's Cords & Party 
Goods" 



409 Bienville St. 
Phone 352-5014 



Welcome Back 
NSU Students 



City Bank & Trust 
Home of NSU Student 
SAVINGS 
& 

CHECKING ACCOUNTS 




< City Bank 
> & Trust 



134 
St. Denis 



Phone 
352-4416 



E.tch deposiior insured to J-40000 



relaxation or whatever the 
Current Sauce staff members 
go down to the Times office 
every Monday afternoon to 
put together the paper. 

Last week, however, we ran 
into a slight problem. We 
didn't find out until last 
Monday that the Times would 
be closed yesterday for Labor 
Day. that caucaused us to 
push everything back two full 
days, because the Times puts 
together their paper on Friday 
afternoons. 

When told of the new 
deadline, Sports Editor Bill 
Bossier passed out and was 
rushed to infirmary, where he 



received expert emergency 
treatment from "Hot Tang." 

'"SBA at a Glimpse' was 
much easier than this," 
moaned new Managing Editor 
Bob Ryder, as he was told of 
the change. 

Colette Oldmixon, Current 
Sauce Editor, remained calm, 
and stated, "We can handle 
it,-' as she proceeded to bang 
her head into the wall. 

As you can see we have all 
recovered from our initial 
shock and have succeeded in 
turning out the paper on time. 

Hopefully in the future we 
won't have any more un- 
planned schedule changes. 



urrer t Sau e 



COLETTE OLDMIXON 

Editor 



BOB RYDER 

Managing Editor 

BILL BOSSIER 

Sports Editor 

PAULA JETTON 

News Editor 

EDITH M. HARRIS 

Assistant News Editor 



MARK SMITH 

Advertising Manager 

MARK BANDY 

Business Manager 

RODNEY WISE 



QUine 



Irs 



•jcile Hetzel 
years has 
Internatii 
Associat 
minted to h< 
c ce progri 
jtern State I 

resident 
trick of 
jounced the f 
universit; 
ijtor of equi 
Mrs. h 
jtinent becc 



OLU AKINRINADE 

Assistant News Editor 



sake of journalistic style and available space. 



convenl 
of yea 
director 
Arabi 



r 




by B. B. King 
(For Riley "B. B." King, the 
Blues started in a Mississippi 
cotton field. Blues has a 
language of its own, the deep 
stabbing hurt that only the 
lost, lonely and downtrodden 
can know. With his guitar, 
Lucille, the language has been 
his — each note and each word 
represents a slice of anguish 
in B. B.'s life. After 21 years a 
new generation has tuned in, 
and the most incredible aspect 
of it all is that the King of the 
Blues did it without com- 
promise.) 

Today I am glad that I am 
the Black man called B. B. 
King, but some time ago I 
wasn't. Sure, I was happy to 
be here and alive, but I'm 
talking about to be really 
proud. I'm beginning to feel 
like I'm somebody. I am a 
Black man, I have black kinky 
hair and a big nose, which is a 
trait of a true Afro-American 
person, and that when you've 
got something of your own, 



just as other people have 
something of their own, you 
should be proud of that little 
bit that you've got because 
yours can measure up to 
theirs. 

Young Black kids today are 
just beginning to look at the 
blues without the feeling of 
shame that their elders did. 
Blues music was considered 
cheap and low-down and you 
weren't ever supposed to talk 
about it, much less sing it. 

During the protests of the 
last 12 or 15 years, the Black 
kids were trying to raise 
themselves up and they didn't 
want anything they felt would 
stand in the way of progress. 
Blues and blues singers made 
them feel ashamed, and in 
some cases, they almost had 
ground to feel that way. They 
heard that guys got drunk, and 
nobody ever saved any 
money, or made it big or 
anything. So, if you mentioned 
blues, it wasn't like saying 
Duke Ellington, or somebody 



Circulation Manager r*** 8 ** 1 *" 
p. Hetzel i 

MIKE RABALAIS f iCm H 

Photographer 0®**** 
v lis presently 

<ed position 

FRANKLIN I. PRESSOR LlAHA's j"< 
Advisor (jnittee. She 
Region 
the state o 

Current Sauce is the official publication of the student bodv 
Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, Louisiana T h 
newspaper is entered as second class matter at the Natchitoches p. 
Office under an act of March 3, 1879. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday during the fall and sprint 
semesters with the exception of holidays and testing periods ana'h «V 
weekly during the summer semester. It is printed at the NatchltocC • 
Times, Highway 1 South, Natchitoches, Louisiana. Relation. 

Editorial offices are located in Room 225, Arts end Sciences 
Building and telephones are 357-5456 and 357-6874, Business. ,„» M 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are solely those of trJ 1 ^ ' ™ rSl 
student editors and do not necessarily represent the viewpoint of tMafinff Arabij 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body of Northwestern r 

Letters to ttte editor are invited and contributions are solicited froiJ^^*' wnere 
students, faculty, and staff and from student organizations. Letter ndine men 
must be signed and no more than 500 words to be considered f B 
publication. Names will be withheld upon request. grida Aral 

The staff of Current Sauce reserves the right to edit all letters fa gelation Tw 

. campaigner 
4ion Raffia 
at Arabian 1 
rlda. 

U Hetzel 
idinated a 
^graphic ei 
lomote the c 
igram of J 1 
lie Universit; 
play July 2 
along with the pop artists, anf lisvUle at 
that's when most Black peopl ^ Horse 
accepted him. Mucky State 

Hinds. 

The way I figure it, blues it 
awayofUfe-blacklife^^. He tzel, 

grandmother likes you." Well, °^;J™^ phones* 

this hurts. This hurts and you ^er on slave ships kept us 4 won severa 

chauis, worked us for nothin^uon 
and I'm tired of it. We've trUL^ 
it your way, now let's tryitmj| , ddition , 

way " tibial and An 

The momentum is picking™, she al 
up now. Black kids would 11 ** in the si 
I was glad that somebody dug come up and say to me, "fl rter horses < 
me. never thought much about the**» ponies. 

People are so class con- blues. I didn't care mu \rthwester 
scious; they associate blues about it; you can't cumce on itj ^g^^ 
with ghetto. They don't but after reading about you, 
respect it. Certain Black now appreciate what you'v 
audiences, before they're done.' 
willing to give credit, they 
wait until the media have 
picked up on you. Ray charles 
has been a genius for 20 years, 
but for a long time he only had 
that precious little in-group of 
followers; finally he got some 
national publicity, then the 
disc jockeys played him right 



Colloquy 

Blues and Black Pride 



else in jazz, which the society 
looks up to. 

Many times a Black kid 
would come up to me and say, 
"You're B. B. King. I don't 
like you, but my dad or my 



have no defense. My only 
defense would be, "I'm glad 
somebody in your family digs 
me." Which is a little weird 
when you say something like 
that, but I really meant it that 



iL, a form 
nd in the I 
tDamby P01 
This is worth all the heaiW Neb., L 
taches and the times wlxp at such fi 
people talked bad about me. m as Mad 
would say to these kids, "Welfden in New 
if you dig me, after a whilet 
you'll dig the blues, becau 
I'm going to keep right 
playing them." 



No-Hassle 
Auto Service 



Bumper- to-Bumper Values 




Brakes - 
Your Choice 

$4Q88 

Additional parts extra 
if needed. 

2-Wheel Front Diac: In- 
stall new front disc brake 
pads • Repack and in- 
spect front wheel bear- 
ings • Inspect hydraulic 
system and rotors (does 
not include rear wheels) 
OR 

4-Wheel Drum-Type: Install new 
brake linings all four wheels 

• Repack front wheel bearings 

• Inspect brake hydraulic system, 
add fluid. 



352-8354 



Engine 
Tune-Up 

$32^5 For 4 cyl. cars 

$ 36 95For6cy,csrs 

$4095 For 8 cyl cars 

12 extra for air-conditioned « rs 
• Our mechanics electron- 
ically fine-fune your e"' 
gine • New points. P' ug 
4 condenser • Test charS' 
ing/starting systenj s ' 
adjust carburetor • ^e'P 
maintain a smooth runnf* 
engine • Includes DatsU". 
Toyota. VW ft light trucks 

8 Ways to Buy 

• Cash • Goodyear Revolving Ch* f 9 e 

• Our Own Customer Credit Pl» n , 
• Master Charge • BankAmeric*' 

• American Express Money Cajd 
1 1 in • Carte Blanche • Diners Clut> 

See Your Independent Dealer For Hie Price. Price. A. eh 

rr.ce. Ai Shown At Goodyear Service Store. 



• Complete chas- 
sis lubrication ft 
oil change • Helps 
ensure long wear- 
ing parts ft smooth, quiet per- 
formance • Please phone for 
appointment • Include, light 
truck. 

Ask for our Free Battery Power Check 



Any U.S. made car - 
parts extra if needed 
Excludes front-wheel drive cars 
• Complete analysis and 
alignment correction - to 
increase tire mileage and 
improve steering • Preci- 
sion equipment, used by 
experienced mechanics, 
helps ensure a precision 
alignment 



GOOD/YEAR 



arc 



\ 

ame 

ssisl 
rofe 

. Cecile C 
^an of the 
*** Econorr 
*tern, said 1 
developed 
^ction pro 
* students wl 
"°ent at NS 
PJ her rese* 
'•t the annua] 
J&ege Pro 
** and Text 
Plater this 

'Jtoe Marc 
J ni, has I 
^'istant pi 
*conomic! 

!? to p" 

"R. Kilnatri 

p. Wcli "will 
7«i dothin 

INent 



^cs durini 

* March, w 
/ List stu 

2! of * 

^fops while 
Illinois 
to 



K 

»veled 

h In Paris j 
J attended 
''hows in 1 
J**l3ostudie( 
^> jewelry 
^uthwestc 



September 7, 1976 CURRENT SAUCE Page 3 



Iquine Science 



(SMITH 

ng Manager 

< BANDY 

s Manager 

IEYWISE 

on Manager 

R ABALAIS 

>grapher 



Ivisor 



Irs. Hetzel heads program 



■(cile Hetzel of Ohio, who for 
$ years has been active in 
International Arabian 
fft Association, has been 
■ointed to head the equine 
fice program at North- 
jtern State University. 

resident Arnold R. 
jatrick of Northwestern 
;5 unced the appointment of 
university's new in- 
ujtor of equine science. He 
H) Mrs. hertzel's ap- 
pttnent becomes effective 
jiediately. 

p. Hetzel is a licensed 
jrican Horse Show 
pdation judg and steward 
U presently serving in an 
fed position as a member 
!N I. PREsson lelAHA's judges selection 
jnittee. She has been an 
Region 14 delegate 
5 the state of Ohio to the 
convention for a 



Ameican Royal in Kansas City 
and Pin Oak in Houston. 

Mrs. Hetzel, who headed a 
riding program at a Vermont 
summer camp for three years 
in the mid-1950's, is 
knowledgeable in the 
breeding, showing and 
training of Arabian horses and 
also has extensive teaching 
experience. 

"The three important 
phases of equitation that we 
will b* teaching as part of the 
equine science program at 
Northwestern," she said, "are 

saddle-seat, hunt-seat and 
jock-seat. Students who come 
through our program will be 



able to show horses or just 
ride them for their own 
pleasure. But most of all, 
there are many stable 

operations around the country 
that are in need of quality 
employees. Stable 
management, training and 
teaching are just a few of the 
areas in which we are trying 

Dr. Jack W. Pace, director 
of livestock operations for 
htedepartment of Earth 
Sciences at Northwestern, 
stated recently that interest in 
the university's equine 
science program has been 
widespread and has received 
much national attention since 



it was established in the fall of 
1975. 

Northwestern is the only 
institution in the South and one 
of the few schools in th nation 
which is presently offering 
students a bachelor of arts 
degree in equine science. 

The university's band of 
horses now includes 12 NSU- 
Foundation-owned Arabians 
and eight other Arabian 
horses which are leased by the 
Foundation for breeding 
purposes. 

In addition to its Arabian 
unit, Northwestern also owns 
a quarter horse collection of 
three mares and four foals. 



WW 



e student body 
. Louisiana Th 

Natchitoches Posiber of years and is a 

the fall and spring director ° f ^ 0hio 

na periods ano £ Arabian Horse 

>t the Natchitorh*, : u 

(elation. 

rfs and Sciences 

l oieiy S, tho^ o, tf> id 195», Mrs. Hetzel began 
tie viewpoint oi ih, -jng Arabian horses in 

Northwestern ' , , 

are solicited fron fid*' wllere S" 6 W* 13 a 

-izations. Letfctmiing member of the 
jrlda Arabian Horse 
edit an letters to^jdation. Two years later, 
campaigned the Arabian 
■■■■■■■■Vjon Raffia to the high 
i Arabian horse title in 
rida. 

(n. Hetzel has already 
T rdinated a colorful and 

f -tographlc exhibit created 

remote the equine science 
igram of Northwestern 
It University. It was on 
(lay July 25-Aug. 1 in 

e pop artists, anf' sviUe at ^ National 
lost Black peopl^ian Horse Show on the 
i. stucky State Fair ground. 



orkshop conducted 



A Resident Assistants 
Training Workshop was 
conducted by the Department 
of Housing during the week of 
registration. 

Contents of the workshop 
were developed during the 
summer session by Les 
Palmer and Debbie Hebert, 
assistants to the Director of 
Housing, both facilitating the 
motivational and instructional 
sessions. 

The workshops consisted of 
concentrated study centering 
on residence hall living. Areas 
emphasized included 
philosophy, administration, 
problem-solving skills, in- 
terpersonal communication, 
self-concept, personal con- 
flicts race relations, 
alcoholism, drugs and 
discipline. 

Resident assistants at 
Northwestern are students 



selected for their leadership 
ability, scholarship, ex- 
perience and a desire to help 
fellow students. R. A.'s live in 
the residence halls and serve 
as a liason between the 
students and the ad- 
ministration. 

The following students were 
participants in the week long 
workshop: 

Phyllis Backa, Sherri Beal, 
Desiree Brown, Laurie Butler, 
Lorraine Camors, Stephanie 
Davitt, Regina Devillier, 
Jolene Ford, Jacqueline 
Foster, Gwen Gatti, Mary J. 
Gremillion, Tommie Hebert, 
Barbara Hogeboom, Marion 
Holcomb, Barbara Judice, 
Deborah Landry, Charlene 
Miller, Kathleen Moore, 
Sylvia Newsom, Carolyn 
Norman, Lissa Parsons, 
Cynthia Peeler, Elizabeth 
Procell, Cheryl Purcell, 



Nadine Rachal, Yolanda 
Rayford, Nell Reed, Alene 
Richardson, and Deborah 
Scott. 

Others who participated 
were Juanita Stanley, Mania 
Strahan, Victoria Tucker, 
Amy Vega, Janie Wallace, 
Jarja Wells, Betty William- 
son, Maxine Williams, Sandra 
Wood, Michael Alost, Gary 
Brown, Michael Brown, Glynn 
Chevallier, Jeff Delaune, 
Kevin Dreher, Gregory 
Dudley, Billy Estes, Michael 
Gray, Ronald Kern, Michael 
Kilmer, Michael Maher, 
Lamon Marchbanks, Robert 
Mathews, Brad Palmer, 
Stephen Preston, James 
Preston, James Roscoe, Mar- 
vin Roque, Barton Sealy, 
Michael Terry, Hilton Verret, 
Frederick Wiley, Ricky Wiley, 
and Thomas Williams. 



igure it, blues t 
-black life. It ty,, Hetzel) who began 
y, you brought uy^ horses at the age of 10 
ships, kept us ^ seV eral saddle-seat 
sdusfornothingjMw, championships on 
of it. We've triesy^ bred horses, 
ow let's try it mjj addit ion to showing 
Mian and American bred 
ntum is pickup™*- she also n »s ex- 
ick kids woulJface in the show ring with 
I say to me, "IW* horses and Shetland 
: much about thefess ponies. 

In t care mu \rthwestern's equine 
^'tdanceonit. ^ ^ ^ 

ung about you Qrmer 

»te what you* todtateeU ^ stateSj 

Damby Pony Farm of 
rth all the he«W Neb., in the ladies' 
the times whan at such famous horse 
I bad about me. m as Madison Square 
these kids, "Wefb in New York, the 
ie, after a whu>| 
e blues, becauk 
o keep right 

amed 

distant 
rofessor 



Cecile C. Mielenz, 
"nan of the Department 
i0Q >e Economics at Nor- 
!!t em, said Miss March 
developed a self- 
action program for 
* students which she will 
lttt *nt at NSU. She will 
her research in this 
Wthe annual convention 
illege Professors of 
*"8 and Textiles in New 
*>» later this month. 

jtoe March of Car- 
Hi., has been appo in- 
sistent professor of 
'economics at NSU, 
iJ* to president Dr. 
Kiloatrick. 



Dunagan gets decree 



Tommy Dunagan, associate 
professor of industrial 
education and technology at 
was awarded the Doctor of 
Education degree during 
summer commencement 
exercises at North Texas State 
University in Denton. 

Dr. Dunagan, who is a 
native of Glade water, Tex., 
has been employed at NSU 
since 1959 and has served as a 
member of the Department of 
Industrial Education and 
Technology faculty since 1962. 



His dissertation for the industrial Arts Programs in 
degree in college teaching was ^ pu b u c secondary Schools 
entitled "An Analysis of the of Louisiana, 1975-76." 



nne 
e-Up 

5 For 4 cyl. ears 
>5For6cyl.c»" 
>5 For 8 cyl. cars 

r-condition«<l c " s 
anics electron- 
tune your « n 
r points. P lugs 
■ • Test charg' 

iretor • He'C 
mooth ninni"* 
eludes Datsu"' 
ft light trucKS- 

)Buy 

rolving Char9 e 
Credit Plan 
nkAmerica' 
rfoney Card 
JinersCluB 




Welcome Back 
NSU Students 

When you're downtown, 
stop in and browse 

Sandefur's 
Jewelry 



352-6390 



Front St. 



* March will be teaching 

* in clothing and tert- 
the university's 

>ent of Home 
JJjcs during the fall 

* March, who was a 

* List student and 
PJ of two state 
l^ips while attending 

11 Illinois University, 
* v eled to clothing 

L to Paris and Madrid 
attended the annual 
[ shows in New York, 
^^so studied American 
^> jewelry and dress 
Southwestern United 




'Focused on, 
v\ll §tudent§ 

Make your appointment now for 

your YEARBOOK PORTRAITS at 

Room 227, A&S Building 



Hours: 10 - 11 ft 1 - 5 Monday 

8 - 5 Tuesday ft Thursday; 
10-5 Wednesday ft Friday 
Through September 17 



COMPARE THESE 
GASOLINE PRICES 



Brand of 



Service Station 


Location 


Gasoline 


REG. 


NO LEAD 


| PREMIUM 


n An a 

ROBO 

PAD Uf ACM 
UAIf If Aon 


HWY. l 

cniiTu 
SOUTH 


TEXACO 


52.9 


mm mm Jm 

55.9 


■ 

mm dWk a 

56.9 


Lauw's Gulf Station 


College Ave. 


Gulf 


62.9 


63 9 




Broadmoor Gulf Station 


Hwy. One South 


Gulf 


61.9 


62.9 


64.9 


Hilltop Gulf Station 


Washington St. 


Gulf 


61.9 


62.9 


64.9 


Sarpy's Gulf Station 


3rd St. 


Gulf 


62.9 


64.9 


65.9 


McCain Gulf Station 


Texas St. 


Gulf 


60.9 


63.9 


64.9 


Seymore Gulf Station 


Lee St. 


Gulf 


63.9 


64.9 


None 


J.C. LaCaze 66 


Hwy. One South 


Phillips 66 


63.4 


64.4 


67.4 


Leary Taylor 


Church St. 


Amoco 


60.5 


65.5 


NONE 


Leary Taylor By-Pass 


By-Pass 


Amoco 


55.9 


57.9 


63.9 


Lindsay's Pak-A-Bag 


Hwy. One South 


Unknown 


53.9 


54.9 


56.9 


Coast Oil Co. 


Hwy. One South 


Unknown 


53.9 


58.9 


59.9 


mm havi #»■ 

Mr. "Q" Station 


3 Locations 


Unknown 


54.9 


57.9 


58.9 


Friandlv Stan 


Wachinfftnn 
witfsningion oi. 


II n If n ami n 

unKnown 


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34.9 


HOME 

nunc 


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Washington St. 


DlllUpS 


55.9 


56.9 


00.9 


7-11 Grocery 


lexas St. 


Unknown 


EE A 

55.9 


57.9 


NONE 


§■ • A ■ A m ■■ 

Fina Service Station 


mm g% . 

Texas St. 


Unknown 


54.9 


57.9 


NONE 


Shamrock Mobil 


Hwy. One South 


Mobil 


53.9 


55.9 


58.9 


Ark Moon 


Washington 


Mobil 


04.9 


A 4 A 

61.9 


A A A 

63.9 


Towne House Texaco 


Hwy. One South 


Texaco 


61.9 


63.9 


58.9 


noiiuaj inn ip\bco 


uy-rass 


Texaco 


A A A 

63.9 


64.9 


A A A 

66.9 


Tynes Texaco 


Texas St. 

j 


Texaco 


61.9 


63.9 


64.9 


Broadmoor Texaco 


Hwy. One South 


Texaco 


57.9 


58.9 


60.9 


Hickory Village CITGO 


Robeline Road 


Citgo 


54.9 


57.9 


NONE 


Thompson CITGO 


Texas St. 


Citgo 


61.9 


62.9 


NONE 


CITGO Lee Street 


Lee St. 


Citgo 


59.9 


60.9 


NONE 


McFarland Station 


Texas St. 


Citgo 


64.9 


66.9 


56.9 


Lakeview EXXON 


Front St. 


Parade 


62.9 


63.9 


65.9 


Westside EXXON 


Texas St. 


EXXON 


59.9 


60.9 


62.9 


Broadmoor EXXON 


Hwy. One South 


EXXON 
EXXON 


57.9 


58.9 


61.9 

* 
• 

■ 



TEXACO 



Prices as of 8-31 -76 



PRODUCTS 



WE DISPENSE THE GAS 
FOR LADIES 



ROBO 



SLASHES 

CAR WASH ft GAS PRICES 
| GAS PURCHASE • 20 GALS. OR MORE FREE car w»sh ^' 

^l^^^s^v^^vHHvH^f^H^ 1 hit*** * '*w*>*f/ 
3 GAS PURCHASE - 15 TO 19.9 GALS 50 e car wash f 

| GAS PURCHASE - 10 TO 14.9 GALS 75' car wash € 

~ GAS PURCHASE - 10 GALS OR LESS $ 1 .00 car wash | 

^^^^^^^^^^^^ > ^^<^^^^^^^^^ 

HO GAS PURCHASE — *" "» 



CAR WASH «2.00 * 

******* i^^^*J*^^ 



NO LEAD ); PREMIUM) 



/ REGULAR) 

) 52.9 \ 



OUR PRICES ARE 
UNBEATABLE 



55.9 \1 56.9 



109 NWT. i south 



ROBO 



CAR 



Page 4 CURRENT SAUCE September 7. 1976 



Lee heads new department 



+ + + + + + + + + + + + )t + 4. + 4. + + 4. + + + * + + + + * + + + + * *+W ++++)(.i lfj S' 

iStudents enjoy Demon Disco Party 



I NSU President Arnold R. 

Kilpa trick has announced the 
: appointment of Dr. Robert 
:iLee as head of the Department 
?>f Counseling and Testing at 
z^SU. 

Lee, whose appointment 
3>ecomes effective im- 
inediately, succeeds Dr. 
:3andy McElwee, who retired 
ESi June after 20 years of 
wrvice to the university as 
testing department chairman. 

The new counseling and 
testing department head joins 
$e NSU faculty after serving 
lor the past three years as a 
^ill-time psychologist with a 
private practice in 
Philadelphia, where he also 
taught part-time in the An- 
tioch College graduate school 
%1 Pennsylvania as a super- 
visor in the counselor 
education program. 

Lee was dean of student 
affairs at Bucks County 
Community College in 
Newtown, Pa., from 1966 to 
1973 and in 1965 was assistant 
dean of students at Long 
Island University in New 
York. 

He received a Bachelor of 



Science degree in history from 
the University of Penn- 
sylvania in 1958 and from the 
University of Wyoming 
earned a Master of Education 
degree in counseling in 1963 
and the Doctor of Education 
degree in counseling and 
guidance in 1965. 

Lee, who is married and the 
father of four girls and two 
boys, is a member of the 
American Psychological 
Association and the American 
Personnel and Guidance 
Association. 

He has completed two 
courses in the use of hypnosis 
which were sponsored by the 
American Society of Clinical 
and Experimental Hypnosis 
and is qualified to work with 
dentists, physicians and other 
professional people interested 
in the widespread use of 
hypnosis. 

Career counseling, study 
skills and interpersonal 
relationships are among the 
major areas of concentration 
for the counseling program at 
Northwestern. 

The testing program at 
Northwestern annually ad- 



ministers a large number of 
national professional 
examinations as well as the 
American College Testing 
exams for high school seniors 
and college students who have 
not taken the test. 
The advanced placement 



and college-level 
examinations and the General 
Educational Development 
tests for non-high school 
graduates are also ad- 
ministered through the testing 
program at NSU. 



Dept. conducts program 



The Department of 
Mathematics at NSU will 
conduct a total metric in- 
service education program for 
som 100 DeSoto Parish 
teachers this fall at the media 
center in Mansfield. 

Directing the program will 
be Dr. Russell Whittington, 
Jr., chairman of the 
mathematics department at 
NSU and a member of the 
National Metric Speakers 
Bureau. 

The NSU department head 
stated that DeSoto is one of the 
first parishes in North 
Louisiana to initiate a total 
program to familiarize 
teachers and parents of 



CANE PLAZA 




Dishwashers 
Washateria Facilities 
Two Swimming Pools 



352-5776 

100 MELROSE AVENUE 



students with the metric 
system. 

Douglas McLaren, 
superintendent of schools in 
DeSoto Parish, said most of 
the teachers and ad- 
ministrators throughout the 
parish will become involved in 
the program, which also in- 
cludes sessions for the public. 

According to McLaren, 
special metric sessions are 
planned for educators, and 
other classes will be con- 
ducted over a two-year period 
for persons who are not school 
personnel. 

"It is commendable when a 
progressive superintendent 
and school board recognizes 

the need to improve education 
in such a vital area and 
proceed to develop and im- 
plement a program designed 
to accomplish positive 
results," said Whittington, 

whose mathematics depart- 
ment at NSU has taken the 
lead in metric education in the 

state and has pioneered and 
developed felxible programs 
to accomplish specific ob- 
jectives. 

Participating this fall will 
be 100 teachers of school 
children in grades kin- 
dergarten through six. Fifty 
more teachers will be involved 
in tne program next spring, 
with the remainder of the 
teachers scheduled to study 
the metric system in the fall of 
1977. 



For The Men 




After wiwig. 
Be*wT anything e(*e 



jour own. Wi th lingering 
powers Ih*t n* lasl 

ItrrwynKputmore 
woman nmyovr life 
Butitimllp-obatfvFut 



Jovan Musk Oil Gift Set 
(4 oz. aftershave/ 
cologne, 7 oz. 
soap-on-a-rope), $8.50 



Jovan Musk Oil 
Aftershave/Cologne 
4 oz., $6 00 



For The Women 



JOVAh 

muskoi 

Musk oil is ft 
exciting scent 
has stimulate! 
passion since 
began. 

A drop behi 
the ear, at the 
of the rveck.b, 
of the knee will 



FREE DELIVERY 




CHECKS CASHED WITH ID 



•EARTH - DRAWS A 
CROWD - Billy Pen- 
dleton and Earth, one of 
the most popular dance 
bands in this area, 
helped turn the SUGB- 
sponsored Demon Disco 
Party into quite a 
success. The music ai- 
ded both shy freshmen 
and returning upper 
classmen as they 
renewed old friendships 
and* started new ones. 
The Natchitoches 
Parish Chamber of 
Commerce served 
cokes and doughnuts, 
honoring an old 
tradition they began 
years ago. All in at- 
tendance had a good 
time. 





nber 30 



{Biber 4 
[ember 6 
ember 11 
ember 14 
ember 18 
sjnber 20 

aary 3 

aary 7 

nary 10 

nary 15 

iwy 17 

jary 20 

nary 24 

nary 27 

lary 29 

uary 31 

ruary 5 
ruary 7 



Best, Hix named visiting professors 



Dr. Roger Best and Dr. John 
L. Hix both faculty members 
from the College of Business 
at Northwestern State Univ- 
ersity have been selected as 
visiting professors for the gra- 
duate program in 
management which Troy 
State University of Alabama 
will conduct during the 1976-77 
school year for the U. S. Air 
Force in Europe. 

Dr. Best is the professor of 
management and chairman of 
the Department of Business 
Administration and 
Economics, and Dr. John L. 
Hix is the associate professor 
of marketing and director of 



research and graduate studies 
for the College of Business. 

Dr. Hix is scheduled to 
depart on August 15 to serve 
six months as a visiting 
professor for the program 
which is to be conducted near 
Frankfurt, Germany. Dr. Best 
will begin his six months of 
service on February 15. He 
will be located near Oxford, 
England, the first three 
months of his tour and near 
Istanbul, Turkey for the next 
three months. 

The NSU educators will be 
teaching graduate courses in 
management to officers 
stationed in Europe with the 



U. S. Air Force. 

Both Doctors Best and Hix 
were visiting professors in 
Europe several years ago 
when they participated in a 
similar graduate program 
sponsored by the University of 
Arkansas. Best was a visiting 
professor for 12 months in 
1972-73, and Dr. Hix lectured 
for five months in the fall of 
1974. 



Prior to joining the 
of Business faculty in 1968, Dr. 
Hix taught at the University ofl»« 
Arkansas and at the Univ 
ersity of Southwestern 
Louisiana in Lafayette 

Dr. Best has previously 
taught at Dana College 
Nebraska, the University of 
Arkansas and at Central 
Missouri State University 



Dept. awarded grant 



ruary 10 
ruary 14 
ruary 17 
ruary 21 



ruary 24 
College wary 26 
►uary 28 

Time 7: 
Iher Colise 



im i 

ipb Pirn, 



Barberton 
k Ohio sta 



Longest lasting 

engine— 
starts instantly, 
generates happiness! 




CARTER JEWELRY 

114C HWY. 1 SOUTH PHONE 352-8940 



The Department of 
Chemistry and Physics at 
Northwestern State 
University has been awarded 
a $5,227 grant from the Exxon 
Education Foundation to 
establish at NSU the Teaching 
Information Processing 
System, an extensive com- 
puter program for assisting 
classroom teaching. 

Dr. Edward W. Graham, 
chairman of the Department 
of Chemistry at NSU, said the 
system provides a computer- 
assisted method of monitoring 
each individual student's 
grask of the subject matter 
and prescribing grasp of the 
subject matter and 
prescribing corrective study. 

The grant is part of the 
Exxon Foundation's IMPACT 
(Implementation of Materials 
and Procedures Affecting 
College Teaching) Program 
which provides funds to im- 
plement educational in- 
novations. 

NSU was one of only nine 
universities in the nation to 



] as one ( 

receive this grant. More Uiaiteams in tl 
300 colleges and universitiei jj N or th, 

applied for participation in tin trsity ' s n 
education program. tat coach 

Graham, who will serve a ». 
the university's P«>i* D preside) 
director attended an Enonfilpatrick 
sponsored workshop to stud] for Geor 
methods of implements need the 
educational innovations « week, f 
Duke University in Norl 
Carolina last May. [brand 

"With this system," * Iry dutie 
stated, "each student wpuig, rec 
receive a progress repoljg co ac h y 
within a few hours after 
an examination which id 
tifies precisely where he 
doing badly or well. It 
suggests ways past * 
present deficiencies might 
overcome and lays out 
individually tailor* 
assignment." 

Graham said the teacher 
who will receive a cW g 
progress report, can mod# ' s ( 
his course in ways based J ^ 
highly specific 
feedback. 



27-year 
I as an a: 
erton for 
sand was 

etianior va 
Eton's \ 
la 5843 
I tale, and 

blast 
26-0 rec 




FREE 



Wr 



352-5555 



LARGE SOFT DRINK 
WITH ANY PURCHASE 
FROM THE COLONEL 

SHOW NSU STUDENT ID FOR FREE LARGE DRINK 
OFFER GOOD THRU SEPT. 30TH 

NSU loves what the Colonel cooks 

Its finger Uckin'good" 

jjjwWkn Fried Chuktn 




rty 



September 7. 1976 CURRENT SAUCE Page 5 



Schedules Announced 



11 


7:30 


Lamar University 


18 


7:30 


Stephen F.Austin 


25 


7:30 


Delta State 


2 


7:30 


Arkansas State 


9 


7:30 


Nicholls State 


16 




Open Date 


23 


7:30 


Louisiana Tech 


30 


2:30 


Northeast Louisiana 


6 


7:30 


McNeese State 


13 


7:30 


Southwestern Louisiana 


Ijcoming 


7:30 




20 


Southeastern Louisiana 



NORTHWESTERN (LA. ) STATE UNIVERSITY 



Beaumont, Tex 
Natchitoches, La. 
Natchitoches, La. 

Jonesboro, Ark. 
Natchitoches, La. 

Shreveport, La. 
Monroe, La. 
Lake Charles, La. 
Natchitoches, La. 

Natchitoches, La. 



iber 30 



ember 4 
jmber 6 
finberll 
(inberH 
«nberl8 
jmber 20 

3 

• 7 
10 
15 
17 
20 
jary 24 
nary 27 
nary 29 
iary 31 



ruary 5 
ruary 7 
iary 10 

rkw*Q ( ruary14 

Uld karyl7 
ruary 21 
pary 24 
the Collegejruary 26 

inl968,Dr,wary28 
diversity of fee Time 7:30 P 

the VmW !T Coliseum 
ithwestern 
pette. 

previously 
College in . 
liversity of 
it Central 
iversity. 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 
BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 
1976-77 
OPPONENT 
NOVEMBER 
McNeese State University 

DECEMBER 

Lamar University 
Centenary College 
Louisiana Tech University 
Nicholls State University 
McNeese State University 
Univ. of Texas Arlington 

JANUARY 
Northeast Louisiana Univ. 
Louisiana College 
Arkansas State University 
Lamar University 
Georgia State University 
Arkansas State University 
University of South Alabama 
Centenary College 
Univ. of Texas-Arlington 
Georgia State University 

FEBRUARY 

Univ. of South Alabama 
North Texas State Univ. 
Northeast Louisiana Univ. 
Houston Baptist University 
University of Southern Miss. 
Southeastern State Univ. 
Louisiana College 
Houston Baptist University 
Louisiana Tech University 
M. 



LOCATION 

Natchitoches, LA 

Beaumont, Texas 
Natchitoches, LA 
Natchitoches, LA. 
Natchitoches, LA 
Lake Charles, LA 
Arlington, Texas 

Natchitoches, LA. 
Natchitoches, LA 
Natchitoches, LA. 

Natchitoches, LA 
Natchitoches, LA. 
Jonesboro, Arkansas 

Mobile, Alabama 
Shreveport, LA. 
Natchitoches, LA. 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Natchitoches, LA. 
Denton, Texas 
Monroe, LA. 
Houston, Texas 
Hattiesburg, Miss. 
Natchitoches, LA. 

Pineville, LA 
Natchitoches, LA. 
Ruston.LA. 



fit 



Pigskin Predictions 




This year has been proclaimed "year of the 
demons!" but since this is the first of the 
pigskin predictions don't expect fantastic 
results from the panel. The two permanent 
panelists are Bob Ryder, managing editor of 
Current Sauce and me. Bill Bossier, the 



sports editor. The guest panelists for this 
week were Thomas Whitehead, instructor in 
the Department of Speech and Journalism, 
and David Walker, vice president of the SGA. 
I wish all members the best of luck ! 





BILL BOSSIER 
SPORTS EDITOR 


BOB RYDER 


DAVID WALKER 


TOM 
WHITEHEAD 


NSU vs Lamar 


NSU .24-14 


NSU 21-7 


NSU 21-10 


NSU 24-18 


LSU vs NEB. 


LSU 17-14 


LSU 24-17 


NEB. 24-13 


NEB 13-12 


Tulane vs Cinci 


TUL 14-3 


TUL 14-0 


TUL. 14-6 


TUL 24-18 


LA. TECH vs BALL ST 


TECH 24-21 


TECH 14-7 


TECH 28-14 


TECH 30-14 


MCNEESE vs SOUTH. ILL. 


MCNEESE 31-10 


MCNEESE 21-0 


MCNEESE 48-12 


SOUTH. ILL. 30-21 


NICHOLLS vs MISS. COL. 


NICH 17-13 


NICH 28-14 


MISS COL. 14-13 


NICH. 24-14 


ARK. ST. vs SAN DIEGO ST. 


ARK. ST. 42-28 


ARK. St. 24-21 


ARK. ST 28-12 


ARK. ST. 30-14 


SLU vs N. ALABAMA 


SLU 21-13 


SLU 14-10 


SLU 24-6 


N. ALA. 42-7 


GRAMBLING vs ALCORN ST. 


GRAM 31-24 


GRAM 40-14 


GRAM 28-0 


GRAM. 30-14 


OKLAHOMA vs VANDY 


OKLA 40-7 


OKLA 35-0 


OKLA 42-0 


OKLA. 36-3 


PITTS, vs OAKLAND 


PITTS 31-17 


PITTS 24-13 


PITTS 17-7 


OAK. 14-13 


PHILA. vs DALLAS 


DALLAS 21-10 


DALLAS 28-7 


DALLAS 24-0 


DALLAS 23-10 


MINN, vs NEW ORLEANS 


N. O. 17-10 


N. O. 24-14 


N. O. 21-20 


N. O. 21-12 


SAN FRAN, vs GREEN BAY 


S. F. 35-21 


S. F. 17-10 


G. B. 20-10 


S. F. 18-13 



Harriers signed up 



Three top high school 
middle-distance runners, two 
of them international students 
from Ireland, have signed 
track scholarships with 
Northwestern State 
University. 



NSU head track coach Jerry 
Dyes announced the signings 
this week of John McLaughlin, 
John O'Donnell and Larry 
Harris. 

McLaughlin, a 5-foot-7, 139- 
pounder from St. Columbus 



NSU acquires 

new links ters 



im named basketball assistant 



iph Pirn, who helped 
-iBarberton High School 
wQMo state basketball 
!#/wjiship and to a 
ion as one of the top ten 

. More thai teams in the nation last 
universities fa Northwestern State 
pationinthnrsity's new graduate 
n. W coach for the 1976-77 

rill serve ai ». 

's Proi^SU president Dr. Arnold 
[ an Exxon filpatrick and athletic 
lop to sunt lor George Doherty 
plementinimced the appointment 
ovations « week. Northwestern 

m Nor * etball coach Tynes 
*rand said Pirn's 
stem," feary duties would be 
tudent flying, recruiting and 
■ess repo* ig coach the varsity. 

27-year old Pirn had 
*hich u» -as an asaistant coach 

■» tberton f or ^ past three 
: \j «s and was head coach of 
past aw 

es might be junior varsity team. 
iys out * "'ton's varsity unit 
t a , 1 o r ei 1«1 a 58-13 record during 
•tale, and they capped 

he te a J »retch last season with a 
^modiflj 2 ^ raord in taking 



e 
can 



s based J ^ 
studen' 



mark in the 1974-75 seasons. 
His teams set school records 
for most consecutive wins 

(32), most wins in one season 
(18), most points in one game 
(99) and fewest points allowed 
in one game (12). 

Pim was a three-year 
basketball letterman at 
Revere High School in Revere, 
Ohio, and helped lead his team 

to a 4844 three-year record 
and to two Suburban League 
championships. He played 
under Jack Greynolds, one of 

the top high school coaches in 
the state of Ohio. 

He participated in freshman 
basketball and baseball at 
Monmouth College in Illinois, 
but an ankle injury sidelined 
him in his sophomore 
basketball season. He was an 



infielder for the Monmouth 
baseball team that won the 
Midwest Conference title. 

Pim transferred to 
Springfield College after his 
sophomore year and received 
a degree in health, physical 
education and recreation in 
1972. Later he attended Ohio 
State and got his Masters' 
degree in physical education, 
with specialization in adapted 
physical education, in 1973. 

Pim is married to the for- 
mer Shelly Lyn Work of 
Springfield, Mass. They have 
no children. 

"We're very fortunate to 
have a man of Ralph's 
teaching and education back 
background on our staff," said 
Hildebrand. "I'm sure that he 
will give us a great deal of 
help in our program." 



s Class AAA state 
onship. 



national publication 
*t>all Weekly rated 
as the seventh best 
8 ehool team in the 

^ last season. During 
year both of the 
' major wire services 
^ them second among 
^'s prep teams. 

also guided the junior 
^team to a 47-6 record 
*?ears, including an 18- 



! 0y 



^TEd hair from the 
legs & face 
ED. ..quickly and 
"•"♦ly by a Registered 
'•'ogist. "G. J." 
'013 Parkway Drive, 
352-4983. By ap 
IS!!? only I 



Discount 
printing 

'Bond Copier 

Se 352-6466 
!8St. Denis St. 



Two outstanding high school 
golfers, one from Illinois and 
one from North Carolina, have 
signed golf scholarships with 
Northwestern State 
University. 

Northwestern athletic 
director George Doherty and 
head golf coach Dr. Derwood 
Duke announced this week the 
signing of Derek Anderson of 
Wake Forest, N. C, and Jay 
Willett of Danville, III., to golf 
pacts. 

Anderson, who played his 
high school golf at Rolesville 
High in Wake Forest, was a 
member of the golf team and a 
letterman for three years and 
was the captain of his team 
during his senior season. 

Chosen the Outstanding 
Golfer on the squad in 1976, 
Anderson led his Class AAA 
team to a second place in 
conference play and to an 
eighth-place finish in the state 
meet. 

Willett, a graduate of 
Schlarman High in Danville, 
also was a three-year golf 
letterman and captain of the 
team during his senior 
campaign. Willett was named 
to the Wausecca Conference 

championship team for the 
past three years and was 



individual medalist for two 
years. 

Willett's team finished 
seventh overall in the state 
tournament, and Willett 
finished tied for eighth in the 
medalist competition. 

"Both of these players 
should help our team 
greatly," Duke said. "They'll 
give us good depth this year, 
and they'll be our leading 
players in a couple of years." 

The Demon golf team, 
which had previously signed 
Rhonnie Valentine of Man- 
sfield to a scholarship, has 
appeared in national tour- 
nament competition for six 
straight years. 



College in Convoy, Ireland, 
clocked a 50.2 in the 400 
meters and a 1:52.9 in the 800 
meters during his career at St. 
Columbus. McLaughlin will 
major in business ad- 
ministration. 

O'Donnell, a 5-foot-ll, 152- 
pound product of Colaiste 
Einde School in Galway, 
Ireland, has a best time of 
3:52.4 in the 1500-meter run, 
approximately equivalent to a 
4:11 mile. He also had 
clockings of 53.5 in the 400 and 
1:54 in the 800 meters. 

The two are the first in- 
ternational runners Dyes has 
coached since taking over the 
head track coaching position 
at Northwest em in 1972. 

Harris, a graduate of Furr 
Senior High in Houston, Tex., 
is a 5-foot-ll, 160-pound in- 
dustrial education major with 
a best time of 49.2 in the 440. 
He also has gone 21-11 in the 
long jump. 

"All three of them should 
help our track team greatly," 
Dyes said. "I'm hoping that 
they can step right in and fill 
some holes that were left 
through graduation." 



COLLEGE CLEANERS 

ATTENTION STUDENTS 

PRESENT ID CARD WHEN LEAVING 
CLOTHES AND GET SPECIAL 
DISCOUNT PRICES ON DRY 
CLEANING & LAUNDRY 



123 JEFFERSON ST. 



PHONE 352 2222 



NSU faculty and student to picture shooting. 

portraits (class pictures) for Office hours during that 

the POTPOURRI will be made period are 8-5 on Tuesdays and 

by two photographers during a Thursdays; 10-5 Wednesdays:: 

two-week period, Sept. 20-Oct. and Fridays; and 10-11 a. m. 

1, the yearbook editor, Patsy and 1-5 p. m. Monday. 

Black, has announced. . 

Both faculty members and A PP.° lntments be 

made in person, not by phone, 

so that the individual will have 5 



students must make ap- 
pointments with the POT- 
POURRI staff, the editor his-her appointment card for 
explained. Appointments will the photographer at the time ] 
be made in the POTPOURRI of sitting, Editor Black said. " 
office, Rm. 227, Arts and She said all pictures will be . 
Sciences Bldg. for two weeks, made in color. No sitting fee 
Sept. 6 through Sept. 17, prior will be charged. 



I? 



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OPEN 8 TO 5 6 DAYS A WEEK 



Page 6 CURRENT SAUCE September 7. 1976 



1976--The Year of the Demons ! 



"We're still lacking in a lot 
of areas; a lot of little things 
that need to be done aren't 
being done," were comments 
made by head coach A.L. 
Williams after the Demons 
scrimmage Thursday 
evening. 

■On Saturday morning Coach 
Williams was singing a dif- 
ferent tune. "We look twice as 
good as we did Thursday. It 
was one of the best morning 
workouts I've ever seen. We 
made such improvement that 
it's hard to believe," Williams 
stated. 

^Thursday's scrimmage was 
ptfcyed before a large number 
ol students who sat in the 
sweltering 90 degree heat to 
-,ee the 1976 edition of the 
Northwestern Demons. 

Williams felt that the head 
had something to do with the 
team's performance. "Some 
uf our people don't really put 



out as much as normal 
because of the heat," he 
commented. 

Sidney "Thundering Bull" 
Thornton, a five-foot eleven 
inch, 242 pound fullback from 
Baton Rouge, rambled for 118 
yards on only 8 carries, in- 
cluding a 57-yard scamper for 




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20 c WASH 

NATCHITOCHES' OHLY 
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a touchdown midway through 
the scrimmage. Thornton also 
scored on a 20-yard screen 
pass play from Stuart Wright, 
starting quarterback. 

Wright had an excellent day 
Thursday, completing six of 10 
passes for 98 yards and had no 
interceptions. Pat Collins was 
Wright's favorite receiver for 
the afternoon, catching four 
passes for 93 yards. 

Thornton's two scores were 
the only TD's managed by the 
two offensive units. Williams 
had high praise for his 
defense, "I was very much 
impressed with the way our 
defenses played. They played 
as a unit, and as a whole they 
diddidn't make many 
mistakes." 

Saturday morning's 
scrimmage was highlighted 
by the strong efforts of four 
freshmen running backs and 
the passing duo— Stuart 
Wright and Mark Rhodes. 

Wright, a senior from 
Natchitoches Central, hit on 
five out of nine passes for 127 



yards and two touchdowns 
One of the TD's was a 70-yard 
bomb to sophomore wide 
receiver Waymond Waters. 




Wright's second score of the 
scrimmage was on a 20-yard 
shot, also to Waters. 

Rhodes, a sophomore from 
Baton Rouge went for seven 
passes for a total of 110 yards. 
Rhodes connected a 55-yard 
TD bomb to Robert Hardwell 
of Jena. Rhodes upped the 
score on a quarterback sneak 
from two yards out. Bruce 
Brickham caught three of 



Rhode's passes for 57 yards. 

Perry Neal lead the four 
freshmen backs with 97 yards 
on eight carries, including a 
57-yard scoring scamper. 
Mark Schroeder added 81 
yards on 16 carries; Bruce 
Knecht of Natchitoches went 
for 76 yards in seven totes, 
including a 52-yard TD run. 
Connie Hatcher of Jena 
carried 14 times for 57 yards. 



The Demon's top two run- 
ning backs, Sidney Thornton 
and Frank Haring both sat out 
the scrimmage with minor 
injuries as did safety Mike 
Maggio and wide receiver 
Jack Brittain. 

"We look twice as good as 
we did Thursday," Williams 
said of Saturday's scrim- 
mage. "We made so much 



improvement that it is hard I 
believe." V 
Of his offensive line, Coad, 
Williams stated, "The f roi |! 
did a better job today by fjj 
Their blocking was niu C )j 
crisper." 

The Demons open their 
campaign September jj 
against Lamar University j„ 
Beaumont, Texas. 



"Finally a dream comes true 



SIDNEY THORNTON 



New grad. asst. named 




Larry Rambin, former 
defensive coordinator for 
Byrd High School in 
Shreveport, has been named 
as NSU's graduate assistant 
football coach for the 1976 
season. 

Dr. Arnold Kilpatrick, 
president of NSU, along with 
football coach A. L. Williams 
made the announcement. 
Williams said that Rambin's 
duties would include 
recruiting, forming of de- 
fensive plans, and aiding in 
the coaching of the defensive 
unit. 

Rambin, a native of 
Shreveport, was a star of- 
fensive guard for Northeast 
La. in the early 1960's. 
Rambin was awarded the "100 
percent" award and was also 
named as the Tribe's "Best 



Defensive Player" in 1961. 

In 1962, Rambin was chosen 
as the best blocker on the Ind- 
ian team and was named to 
the All Gulf States Conference 
team at offensive guard. 

Rambin returned to 
Shreveport after coaching at a 
high school in Apopka, Florida 
for two years, and became 
defensive coordinator at Byrd. 
During his first two seasons 
(1968^9), Byrd put together 
records of 1-9 and 2-8 
respectively. After that, the 
Yellow Jackets reached the 
state playoffs two years in a 
row, compiling records of 9-2 
in 1970, 8-3 in 1971 and 7-3 in 
1972. Byrd High's defense 
under Rambin were peren- 
nially among the top three 
defensive teams in the 
district. 



ST40M) 

H8ffTHW£STBffl„STffe IHVHBfTT 



For too long it had been no 
more than a dream, an idea in 
the back of the minds of 
Northwestern State 
University's administrators, 
athletic officials, coaches and 
students. 

Now, at last, that dream is 
coming true in the partially- 
completed construction of 
Harry "Rags" Turpin 
Football Stadium, an ultra- 
modern, 15,522-seat structure 
that will replace ancient 
Demon Stadium as home of 
the Northwestern football 
team. 

The stadium bears the name 
of one of the state's most illus- 
trious sports figures. Coach 
Turpin, who died in 1974 
following a lengthy illness, 
served for 30 years on the 



Northwestern coaching staff 
before retiring in 1956. 

After serving as an assistant 
coach for eight years, Turpin 
was appointed head football 
coach in 1934. He had the 
longest tenure of any head 
football coach in the history of 
the university, and his 
crowning coaching 
achievement came in 1939 
when the Demons put together 
an 11-0 record, one of only two 
unbeaten seasons in school 
history. 

Ironically, old Demon 
Stadium was built in 1939. The 
old stadium , which at one 
time also housed students, had 
been improved very little 
since original construction 
with the exception of theatre- 
type seats which were in- 



stalled several years ago. 

The east side, which will be 
utilized by students, will seat 
5,923 when completed, and it is 
scheduled to be ready for 
Northwestern's Sept. 18 home 
opener against Stephen F. 
Austin. 

The west side will also be 
used this season, with the 
exception of the top rows 
which will have been removed 
to permit construction of a 
second deck. Building on the 
west side is scheduled to be 
completed by September, 1977. 

The two decks will have a 
combined capacity of over 
9,000, and between the two will 
be a glassed-in area for 
visiting dignitaries, school 
and athletic officials and 
members of the Demon 



[AT OL' I 



ese banc 
it music i 
id began 
registra 



Booster Club. 

A new multi-level press bo,C e s ~re 
will sit atop the upper deck vw here 
and will have room for hanf 
media members and other 
game workers. 

One unique aspect of the 
new stadium is its all-new 
Astroturf field, one of only 
three artificial fields in the 
state and the only outdoor oneDe<Hl 
used by a collegiate football I 
team. The other two fields are If. Robert 
located at LSU'sBernie Moore It College < 
Track Stadium and in the SI has beer 
Superdome. the Commi 

The total cost of the stadium location in 
renovation is $4,812,600 and is i recently 
only a part of the total iBoard of T 
renovation of the NSU athletic leges and 
teams is planned for com- be comrr 
pletion in the near future and Bluets its 
will be located at the south end kt 23 in B; 
of Turpin Stadium. 



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September 7. 1976 CURRENT SAUCE Page 7 



ROTC announces awards 



ispect 



. AT OL' NSU SPIRIT — The NSU 

press ilx« jgj es rece j ve support from e- 
e upper deck^here during their games, 
room for lee Be \y an ^ members are proving 
•s and otho; j m usic isn't their only talent. The 
id began practice one week prior 
aU-ne» rc^ 8 *- 1 " 3 ** 011 an( * ^ practice 



from 4 to 6 p. m. on Mondays, 
Wednesdays, and Fridays. The band 
officers are Terry Hopkins, 
President; Susan Kelly, secretary- 
treasurer and Jaree Sherrer, 
reporter — with Dwayne Hubbard as 
Drum Major. During Demon Day 



the band split into three sections and 
played at various locations in Nat- 
chitoches and also at the freshman 
assembly. All persons interested in 
becoming band members may 
contact Dr. Jerry Payne. 
Scholarships are available. 



one of only 

fields in the = — - - - - 

y outdoor one l)ean Alost to serve on reform commission 

giate football 

problems of teacher education and Recreation at NSU. 



POTPOURRI A P PRENTICES NEEDED 



two field) are Dr. Robert A. Alost, dean of 
Bernie Moore i College of Education at 
and in the I has been chosen to serve 
lie Commission to Reform 
if the stadium nation in Louisiana which 
812,600 and is t recently established by 
rf the total Board of Trustees for State 
NSU athletic lieges and Universities, 
ed for com- !he commission, which 
it future and (ducts its first meeting 
the south end p. 23 in Baton Rouge, was 
m- tated to analyze the 



and certification and for- 
mulate recommendations to 
deal with the problems of 
public education in Louisiana. 

Alost was appointed as dean 
of education at Northwestern 
in July of 1975. He joined the 
university faculty in 1963 and 
served for 10 years as 
chairman of the Department 
of Health, Physical Education 



The Alost dean is a native of 
Alexandria and taught 
mathematics at Alexandria 
Junior High in Alexandria and 
at Central High School in 
Baton Rouge before joining 
the NSU faculty. He also 
coached and taught at 
Istrouma Junior High School 
in Baton Rouge. 



Two openings exist on the 
POTPOURRI staff for Fresh- 
man apprentices, according to 
the editor. Patsy Black. 

Freshmen interested in the 
apprentice positions should 
have had experience on their 
high school yearbook staff, 
preferably as editor. Black 
said. Staff members of the 
POTPOURRI must be sure 
they will have the necessary 
time to devote to the year- 
book's needs, the editor said. 



Those who wish to apply for 

these staff positions may write 

a letter of application to the 

POTPOURRI editor, stating 

their desire to work as a staff 

member, their experience 

with yearbooks, and other 
pertinent information. 
Application letters may be 

sent to, or left with, the 

POTPOURRI adviser, Ezra 

Adams, Rm. 225, Arts and 

Sciences Bldg. Deadline for all 

applications is Sept. 15, Editor 

Black said. 



Five members of the 
Reserve Officers Training 
Corps at NSU won awards for 
their participation in the six- 
week Advanced ROTC 
Summer Camp conducted at 
Ft. Riley, Kan. 

Receiving summer camp 
awards were William I. Nipp 
of Leesville, Joel W. McCart of 
Haughton, Timothy O'Neal 
and Wendell Robinson of 
Shreveport, and Warren Sears 
of Dry Prong. 

All five of the NSU ROTC 
cadets won the coveted REC- 
ONDO insignia award. They 
completed all phases of the 
arduous RECONDO training 
program which included such 
areas as physical training, 

Bailey 
appointed 

NSU president Dr. Arnold 
R. Kilpatrick has announced 
the appointment of Dr. 
Mildred H. Bailey as acting 
chairman of the university's 
Department of Elementary 

Education. 

In addition to heading the 
elementary education 
department, the NSU 
professor will continue to 
serve as chairman of the 
university's Division of 
Reading, a position she has 

held since 1972. 
Dr. Bailey joined the 

College of Education faculty 

in 1963, specializing in reading 

education, and she directed 

NSU's eading Center from 

1967 until 1971. 
She received the bachelor of 

science degree in business ad- 
ministration from NSU in 1950 
and the master of arts in educ- 
ation degree from NSU in 1960. 
Dr. Bailey earned her doc- 
torate in elementary 
education from the University 
of Mississippi in 1965. 

Dr. Bailey is currently 
serving as president of the 
Association of Louisiana 
University Teachers of 
Reading. She is a former 
member of the State 
Department of Education's 
reading textbook adoption 
committee. 



land navigation and orien- 
teering, rappelling, rope drops 
and the slide for life. 

McCart, Robinson and Sears 
were presented the physical 
proficiency award for scoring 
450 or more points of a 
maximum 500 points on the 
physical fitness test. 

The military proficiency 
award was also presented to 
O'Neal and McCart. They 
ranked in the top five per cent 
among all cadets who par- 
ticipated in the land 
navigation and orienteering 
and military stakes phases of 
training. 

O'Neal was the only NSU 



cadet to receive the platoon 
leadership award. He was 
selected as the outstanding 
cadet in his platoon. 

The five cadets who won 
awards were among 14 NSU" 
students who participated this 
summer in training programs' • 
conducted by the Department 
of the Army and the Third 
ROTC Region. 

NSU cadets participated in 
airborne training at 
Benning, Ga., basic training ' 
at Ft. Knox, Kt., advanced 
training at Ft. Riley, Kan., 
and orientation training at Ft.' 
Sill, Okla., and Ft. Rucker-, 
Ala. 



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Page 8 CURRENT SAUCE September 7, 1976 



SID office acquires new director 



3-Columns 



Dan McDonald, a native of 
Jonesboro, has been appointed 
to succeed Pesky Hill as 
Sports information director at 
NSU according to an an- 
nouncement by NSU president 
Dr. Arnold Kilpatrick. 

Hill who for four years was 
the sports information dir- 
ector here resigned this 
summer to assume the 
position of assistant sports 
information director at 
Oklahoma State University in 
Stillwater. McDonald, the new 
director, has been a sports 
writer and columnist for the 



Alexandria Daily Town Talk 
for the past year. He gained 
extensive experience in sports 
reporting for newspapers and 
radio as a college and high 
school student. 

An honor graduate from 
Northwestern in May of 1975, 
McDonald attended the 
university on a State Board of 
Education Academic 
Scholarship. He joined the 
Town Talk Staff immediately 
after receiving his journalism 
degree from NSU. 

While attending Nor- 
thwestern, McDonald served 



from 1972 until 1975 as a 
student assistant to the sports 
information director and held 
the positions of editor-in-chief, 
assistant editor, sports editor 
and reporter on the staff of the 
university's weekly student 
newspaper, The Current 
Sauce. 

The Current Sauce won 
second place honors for 
overall excellence in state 
competition the year that 
McDonald served as editor-in- 
chief of the campus 
publication. 

A graduate of Jonesboro 
High School, McDonald was a 
sports reporter and columnist 
for the Jackson Independent 
and a sports correspondent for 
The Shreveport Times. He has 



been a sports broadcaster for 
KTOC in Jonesboro and 
KDBH in Natchitoches. 

McDonald, the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Ross McDonald of 
Jonesboro, is a member of the 
Society of Professional 
Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi, 
and the Louisiana Sports 
Writers Association. 

As a student at Nor- 
thwestern, McDonald was 
invited for membership in Phi 
Kappa Phi National Honorary 
Academic Fraternity and was 
listed in Who's Who Among 
Students in American 
Universities and Colleges. 

While serving as a student 
assistant in the NSU Division 
of Informational Services, 
McDonald assisted in editing 





Bill, Dorothy, &Jeannie 

The Cellar 



HairSalon 



Room 1 60 NSU Student Union 

357-5451 




and compiling material for 
three sports brochures which 
won national honors in the 
College Sports Information 
Directors of America and 
National Association of In- 
tercollegiate Athletics 
publications competition. 

Kilpatrick said in an- 
nouncing McDonald's ap- 
pointment, "Dan has an 
unusual wealth of experience 
and abilities for a young man 
his age, and we feel fortunate 
to have him on our staff. He is 
respected among his peers, 
and his enthusiasm, 
dedication and initiative will 
make him a valuable asset to 
our athletic program." 

McDonald is married to the 
former Karren Hataway of 
Crowley. His appointment 
becomes effective im- 
mediately. 



I COULD FALL 
ASLEEP! — This was 
one of the many sen- 
timents expressed by 
students as they went 
through the new 
registration process. 
Long lines and long 
waiting periods were 
characteristic of this 
year's registration and 
complaints of tired and 
sore feet were 
numerous. Students will 
find that the new 
registration policy will 
aid them and the ad- 
ministration. 



Artists 
display work 

Nine of Louisiana's most 
innovative artists are 
presenting an exhibit of 
drawings August 27 through 
September 17 in the A. A. 
Fredricks Fine Arts Center 
Gallery on the campus of 
Northwestern State 
University. 

Bob Farley, Agi Vajna, 
Zuleyka Benitez, Nat Thomas, 
John Martinez, K. C. Ar- 
ceneaux, Cliff Webb, Sam 
Losavio and Margaret C. 
Moore are the participants in 
the group show. 

Robert Rector, assistant 
professor of art and gallery 
coordinator at Northwestern 
arranged the exhibit. 

"The drawings that will be 
on exhibit," said Rector, "are 
in several styles with a wide 
variety of subject matter. The 
drawings displayed will show 
that drawings can be more 
than just pictures and 
technical skill. They can show 
emotion and humor and make 
statements about our 
society." 

Rector stated that all of the 
participating artists are 
graduates of Louisiana 
universities, and many are 
now living and working in the 
state. 

The drawings exhibit will be 
on display from 8 a. m. until 4 
p. m. Monday through Friday 
in the university gallery. 



Bush appointed professor 



NSU president Dr. Arnold 
R. Kilpatrick has announced 
the appointment of Dr. Helen 
Bush as an associate professor 
in the College of Nursing's 
graduate program which is 
conducted on the NSU 
Shreveport campus. 

Dr. Bush, received the Ph.- 
D. degree in education from 
Arizona State University- 
Tempe in June. 

Dr. Bush is a member of the 
American Association of 
University Women, National 



League for Nursing, 
American Hospital 
Association, American Nurses 
Association, Pi Lambda Theta 
National Honor Society and 
the Western Commission for 
Higher Education in Nursing 
Research Steering Com- 
mittee. 

She is also a nursing con- 
sultant for the public health 
service of the Department of 
Health, Education, and 
Welfare. 



When you think 
of men swear.... 



think of & 



a 



Capuan* 



Located next to Broadmoor Shopping Center 



Grant awarded 

The Northwestern State 
University Department of 
Chemistry and Physics has 
been awarded a $17,200 in- 
structional scientific grant by 
the National Science Foun- 
dation. 

"Beginning chemistry 
laboratories often do not 
capture the excitement of 
scientific experimentation," 
Dr. Edward W. Graham, the 
department chairman added. 
"The techniques used in the 
laboratory, usually dictated 
by the available equipment for 
the large number of students 
taking the course, are often 
tedious, repetitous and out- 
moded, with little of the flavor 
of modern chemistry." Dr. 
Graham said the grant will 
enable the university to 
purchase instrumentation for 
the department's general 
chemistry course to introduce 
experiments designed to lead 
students into a discovery of 
principles. 

Dr. Graham continued to 
say that the use of modern 
equipment in the beginning 
laboratory will add zest to the 
course, give a more realistic 
view of chemical ex- 
perimentation and focus the 
student's attention on the 
chemical principles. 

According to Dr. Graham, 
the grant will permit exciting 
new experiments to be added 
to the course involving such 
topics as atomic structure, 
spectrophotometry, ther- 
modynamics, chemical 
kinetics and electrochemistry. 
School Board and the College 
of Education at NSU. 

Gahagan 

gets grant 

Mrs. Sharon Gahagan, a 
supervising teacher for the 
deaf-oral program at the NSU 
Laboratory School, has been 
awarded two grants totaling 
$2,367 by the State Depart- 
ment of Education to provide 
tutorial services for special 
education students. 

Beginning in September, the 
NSU supervising teacher will 
be working with two deaf 
children from Natchitoches 
Parish. The students will be 
receiving tutorial services in 
such areas as speech training, 
language arts, reading skills 
and auditory training. 

One of tiie students will 
enter fourth grade at the NSU 
Elementary Laboratory 
School this fall, and the other 
student will enroll in the 
seventh grade at Marthaville. 

Both students have been 
enrolled as full-time students 
in the deaf-oral program at 
NSU since the project was 
begun in 1970 as a joint effort 
by the Natchitoches Parish 




by 



Welcome Back 




Students 




ask about our student checkinp 
£em° E m N J S , W J™° ut s E Sv.c H ec C h K arg E s 

REMEMBER TO PICK UP AN NSI1 nrr ai 
WHEN YOU OPEN YOUR ACCOl/nT 
WE ARE LOCATED AT 120 CHURCH ST 
AND LA. HWY. 1 SOUTH. " UKCH ST ' 



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MEMBER FDIC 



Car? 




Fifteen full-time and 
time students are expected* 
participate this fall in J" 
deaforal program conducS VTV 
at the NSU Middle Laborato L 
School. ^mmm 

Mrs. Gahagan, who heK, Mine 
establish the deaf . ^£!l^ 
program at NSU, receive 
certification to teach the deaf 
in 1968 from LSU in Bato 
Rouge. She taught f or ^ 
year at the Louisiana State 
School for the deaf and served 
another year as a speech aw l> s P eakin 
hearing consultant for tk» l ' entS ' ast 
State Department of * ^ A 
ucation's vocationai" irresiden 
rehabilitation division |dy , topic 
working with deaf childr^C^ 
over 16 years of age and deaf ^ UP S3 ' 
adults. % wnich ' 

The NSU 
teacher in 

program received her ^ 
master's degree in reading ^ ir ° rd 
from Northwestern. tP^S" b > 

Course Offered 

Northwestern State , m betv 
University will offer this fall , l^g to 
broadcast course for college resident 
credit called "The Adam, J been £ 
Chronicles," which details the of the 
lives and contributions of four «mber, a 
generations of the Adams 
family from 1750 to 1900. 

The course will be coor- 
dinated with the 13-part series ; a u U p 
of the same title, which will be hc tors tiu 
produced in New York by ^ ye ar' 
WNET-TV and fed nationally a n 



supervising "^ 
the dea^o rl S' esentatl, 



then Pre 
was 
over 



opaign fo: 



m 



by the Public Broadcasting 
Service. It begins Sept. 20 a!tlU rnany 
p.m. on KLTM Channel 13 in B tor Mc( 
Monroe, the new educational pg e thing 
television station in Louisiana. „y more 

Entitled History 408 at NSU, ^date, h< 
the course will end with a final ,qqp ^ a 
examination on Dec. 14. It jp 0r t ma 
carries three hours of j^. The 
graduate or undergraduate kocrats h 
credit from Northwestern. L Urifc-re 
The program will be coor- j jo Ford 
dinated by NSU's Division of B g e cr isi 
Continuing Education. j 1943 C( 

Dr. Hoyt Reed, director of ^ry of Ha 
continuing education, said two n „ An in 
sections of the telecourse will (Hmgaria 
be offered. On section will be ^ - m jqc 
conducted on the NS"-,^,,^ 
Natchitoches campus in Room v last 10 c 
303 of John S. Kyser Hall, art 
the other will be held in 
Cavanaugh Hall on the 
Louisiana College campus in 
Pineville. Registration f° r lihe Studei 
both sections will be at 7 p.m. 1 accept j n 
Sept. 15. fpresentat 

In addition to registration L rations 
sessions, other class meetings L ^ ^ 
are scheduled on Oct. 26 for ^3^^, 
discussion, Nov. 2 for mid- L f u owin 
term examinations, Dec. 7 for C0J 
discussion and Dec. 14 for the Lj nours 

final exams. Selected 
"The Adams Chronicles" oy| 
was first aired in the spring of ^ ^ 
1976, and more than 50H on gch 
colleges offered the program a 
for credit. High acclaim has ^ ^ 
been given the series and W j ^ ^ 
accompanying academic 
support materials. 

The series of 13 hour-long ( 
dramatizations of f oUf 
generations of the Adarn'phe Qff ice 
family was made possible Wwng for s 
grants from the National w,ii c Relat 
Endowment for rodents w 
Humanities, the Andrew Wfod be i 
Mellon Foundation and ^fauitment 
Atlantic Richfield Corneal to ] 
"The Adams Chronicles" "Jjstant in 
American history through' pQdents wl 
study of a family who help^taram W oi 
design, preserve and expand* thigh gc j 10( 
nation. The offices that JO* We of th 
Adams and his descendant tin th e pr( 
held parallel the history of ""jh schools 
nation. .4 
The largest and mo» l 
significant original draflj 
series to be comple^ 
produced for non^mrnef^ 
broadcasting in 
"The Adams Chronicles" 

created & 

sancti" 
of 

■ 

Adams Papers, . 
Massachusetts Historic 
Society and The Harv» r 
University Press. , 

The Adams P«P*j 
bequeathed in trust to ^ 
Massachusetts Histon c 
Society, is a S.OOO.OOHj 
body of journals, diaries ^ 
letters by members °f 
Adams family. ^ 

For additional taforrna^ 

concerning the ^ ec0 ^ f A 
being offered by Northwest*^ 
this fall, interested pe fS ^ 
may contact the Divisio"^ 
Continuing Education o" 
NSU campus 



stude 



] 



conceived and 
WNET by Virginia 
with the exclusive 
and collaboration 




^ Ser 
^nstitu 
Siting 
^ by 5 



time and 



Part- 



are expected u 
is fall ^ £ 

ram conduct 

>«fleUbor»tJ|. 



URRENT SAUCE 



LXIV, No. 2 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 



NATCHITOCHES. LOUISIANA 



September 14. 1976 



*n. who heipw ; s tingu is hed Lecture Series 

*SU, received 
i teach the d ea t 

* Bato„ 
aught for 



'Is it all over for the GOP?' 



one 

Louisiana State 
leaf and served 
s a speech and 
Utant for ^ 
:ment of 

vocational 
n division 

deaf childrei 
rf age and deaf 

supervising 
the deaf-oral 
jceived her 
ee in reading 
tern. 

Offered 
ern state 
offer this fall s 
:se for collegi 
"The Adarns 
riich details the 

ibutions of fourt^iber, and that was in 1 
t the Adams , 
50 to 1900. 



by JESSIE M. NIPP 
jspeaking to NSU faculty, staff and 
jeiits last Thursday morning in the 
( Arts Auditorium, George Gallup 
president of Gallup Poll, chose the 
uly topic, "Is It All Over For The 

r 

jdlup said that the latest Gallup 
H which is a public opinion survey 
#i on personal interviews with a 
f esentative sampling of the people, 
e als that Jimmy Carter leads Pre- 
pt Ford in this year's presidential 
jpaign by 52 percent to 37 percent, 
jallup discussed the political scene 
jthe possibilities of the GOP closing 
gap between now and November, 
(ording to pollings based on the last 
presidential elections, only once has 
re been a pronounced shift in the 
ice of the voters between July and 



will be coor- 
e 13-part series 



then President Johnson's 32 point 
irgin was reduced to a 22 point 
Igin over Senator Goldwater. 
jallup said that there are a number 
i, which will be bctors that could cause such a shift 
New York by tfais year's election. Among them, 
fed nationally jgan's announcement that he will 
Broadcasting f or Ford could help to win 
ns Sept. 20 at 7 U many defectors. Also, former 
Channel 13 in Lor McCarthy's candidacy could 
:w educational Lg e things. By getting his name on 
in in Louisiana. ny mor e ballots as a third party 
)ry 408 at NSU, jfldate, he could tip the balance to 
aid with a final .GOP in a close election as he draws 
n Dec. 14. It pport mainly from Carter sup- 
e hours of ^ The GOP could also win if 
undergraduate kocrats fail seriously to get out the 
Northwestern. ^ Unforeseen world events could 
will be coor j to Ford's vote just as a grain 
J's Division of n g e crisis m the midwest in late 
ication. t 1948 contributed to the upset 
ed, director of ^ f Harry Truman over Thomas 
:ation, said two m y international crisis such as 
telecourse will ^Hungarian Revolution and the Suez 
section will be to 1956 wnich cause< i 3 to 4 

1 tne NSU 'i)i» voters to swing to the GOP in 
impus in Room ^ 10 days of carnpa ig n) could 

lyser Hall, and 

^"call^UGB slates elections 

sge campus in 

jistration for n eStudent VTdon Governing Board 
ill be at 7 p.m. accepting applications for one 
presentative-at-large and for a 
to registration Wrations cornm ittee chairman, 
class meetings fc ^ eligiDle for election ag a 
on Oct. 26 for (resentative at large, one must meet 
v. 2 for ml 1 f u owm g requirements: 1) suc- 
ions, Dec. 7 for completed a minimum of 30 
Dec. 14 for tne ^ hourg flt ^ end rf ^ semester 

„ Selected; 2) possess a minimum 2.0 
3 Chronicles 1 ^ overallj 3) ^ a fuU-time 
in the spring" ^ ^ good standing . 4) may not 

>re than 1 on scri olastic or disciplinary 
1 the program &ni 5) ^ nQ{ ^ & yoting 

h acclaim h» t^r of the SBA while in office, 
series and » To ^ committee chair- 

; academic 

als. 

f 13 hour-long 
s of fotf 



make an impact on the election, as 
could the upcoming televised debates 
between the candidates. But barring 
such imponderables as have been 
mentioned, prospects are not seen as 
favorable for the GOP in '76. 

Jimmy Carter's sudden rise in favor 
is the political story of the year, Gallup 
said. There has been much speculation 
about the basis of his appeal, but it is 
not hard to find. First of all, Carter's 
political philosophy is perceived by the 
public as matching their own 
philosophy. In addition, the public likes 
his early record on fiscal conservatism 
because there is a strong conservative 
tie in this country. An anti-Washington 
mood in this country is seen not only in 
the desire to balance the budget, but to 
cut down the number of federal em- 
ployees. Ethical standards of 
Congressmen and Senators are 
regarded as very low by the American 
people. 

In addition, Gallup said that not least 
of the key elements for this support of 
Mr. Carter is found in his religious 
beliefs. "It may well be that a 
significant number of voters are not 
overly concerned about Carter's 
position on issues as long as they are 
convinced that he will take a religious 
or prayerful non-political approach to 
try to solve them," Gallup said. 

Gallup further stated that according 
to polls to gauge the economic mood of 
the nation, the high cost of living and 
unemployment — in that order — are 
the chief concerns of every citizen at 
this time, and this concern will play a 
large part in how they vote. 

In explaining polling methods, Gallup 
said that after years of study, Gallup 
Poll has fixed upon 1500 as being the 
number of respondents best suited for 
their needs. It is very important that 
these people represent the proper 
proportion of Catholics, Southerners, 
young people, older people, etc. 



Gallup described the mood of the 
American people today as definitely 
upbeat. "Within the last 12 months, the 
public has taken a shift to the right, that 
is, toward a more conservative point of 
view," he said. This seems to signal the 
end to the era of permissiveness. The 
shift in mood is seen in the trend among 
parents of school age children in favor 
of a return to basics in curriculum and 
to stricter discipline in school. 

Other indications of this shift to 
conservatism are widespread support 
of the death penalty, desire of 
Republicans and Democrats alike to 
reduce Federal spending, and in the 
choice of presidential candidates. 

Three reasons for this increasingly 
upbeat mood were given by Gallup. 
First, the nation has had to find 
resources to survive difficult periods in 
the past. Second, Americans have the 
capacity for self criticism. And third 
the American people realize there is 
much they can do as individuals to 



bring about a better society. 

"Indeed there is an explosion of 
volunteerism today at all levels of 
society," Gallup said. 

Some ways he pointed out that in- 
dividuals can help to bring about a 
better America are: 

L By participating in the political 
process. 

2. By giving thought to his choice of a 
career. 

3. By doing his share to help solve 
community problems. 

4. By keeping himself informed. 

5. In raising families to be good 
citizens. 

6. By putting his religious beliefs into 
practice. 

Gallup admitted that there is much 
that is discouraging about America 
today, but there is much that in- 
dividuals can and must do to rein- 
vigorate society as we move into the 
third century of our history. 



Document revised 




manship , a candidate must meet the 
following requirements: 1) must have 
been an active member of a Union 
committee for at least one semester or 
presently serving on a committee; 2) 
must possess an overall 2.0 average; 3) 
must be a full-time student in good 
standing; and 4) may not be on 
scholastic or academic probation. 

The deadline for filing for these 
openings is Tuesday, Sept. 21 at 4:30 
p.m. Applications may be obtained in 
Room 214 of the Student Union. 

Election for these positions will be 
held Sept. 27. 



This is the first of a three part story to 
be written in conjunction with the 
rewritten constitution of the Student 
Government Association that will be 
run three weeks in succession. 

On Oct. 5, the students of NSU will 
vote on a new or rewritten constitution 
of the SGA that will need a simple 
majority to be approved. 

"The new constitution will be easier 
to interpret as opposed to the old one 
that had too many items unexplained 
and was very vague," according to Bob 
Ryder, SGA Senate Chairman. 

The new revisions would do away 
with three positions and save three half 
scholarships valued at $1300 per 
semesters. 

In the executive council the con- 
stitution would combine the positions of 
the Vice President of men and the Vice 
President of women inton one position, 
Commissioner of Elections, and save 
one of the half scholarships. 



Also eliminated will be the positions 
of Chairman of the Senate and Clerk of 
the Senate. The Vice President of the 
association will assume the job of 
chairman and Secretary will assume 
the duties of the clerk. This move will 
eleminate two of the half scholarships 
bringing the total to three. 



The president of the Associated Men 
Students and the president of the 
Associated Women Students will act as 
ex-officio members of the Executive 
Council and represent their respective 
members at the meetings. 

In the judicial branch, under the old 

constitution, the Supreme Court 
Justices were appointed by the 
president and served for their life at 
NSU or until they were impeached for 
just cause. Under the new constitution 
they will still be appointed by the 
president but will only serve for one 
year or until impeached for just cause. 

The money saved by the revisions 
will benefit the students and will be 
used to pay for legal aid services. In the 
near future students will be able to seek 
the advice of a lawyer in Natchitoches 
subject to approval by the SGA. The 
lawyer and the SGA will have a fixed 
fee for each visit and this fee will be 
paid by the SGA. 

These are just a few of the revisions 
of the new constitution but are most of 
the highlights. The constitution will 
appear three consecutive weeks so the 
students will have a chance to review it 
properly. 



GEORGE GALLUP ADDRESSING STUDENTS— George 
Gallup, the first speaker of the semester for the Distinguished 
Lecture Series spoke to large group of students at the A. A. 
Fredericks Fine Arts Auditorium, last Thursday. 




SUGB AT WORK— SUGB President Rory Alexander calls a 
meeting of the Union Board to order. Several items were 
discussed at the meeting, including the Lady of the Bracelet 
pageant. Persons interested in serving on Union Board as Rep- 
at-large or Decorations Chairman should go by Mr. Wilson's 
office in the Student Union to apply. 



LOB of ficials choose theme 



External Affairs to provide PR jobs 



• the Adams ^ off . (;e q{ External Affairs is 
de possible Wfting for s t u dents to work with their 
the National to c Rations program. 

for ** e Rttdents who work with the program 
ie Andrew he instrumental in student 
ition and "^uitment for Northwestern. Ac- 
ield tampan*' Wing to r^bbie Hebert, graduate 
Chronicles" "totant in charge of the program, 
iry through » Indents who become involved in this 



ily who "^rSfam would help sell Northwestern 
e and expand ^ school students .» 

ices that JG* *m e of the various activities which 
s descendan (j,^ p,.^^ delude traveling to 
e history of A* jh schools, hosting groups of high 
t and mo^ 1 stud ents who visit the NSU 
iginal dram* 
i complex,' 
an-commerci* 
in ArneriC' 
tironicles" *J 
[ created «j 
rginia 

sane** 

of 1* 
1 

ipers, 1 
s History 
The Harv»f° 



campus, conducting tours of the 
campus, and like projects which would 
promote NSU. 

Schools outside of the regular tour of 
recruitment which will be visited this 

semester are Chalmette High School in 
conjunction with Andrew Jackson High 
School, Archbishop Rummel, Brother 
Martin High School in conjunction with 
St. James Major High School, Cabrini 
High School, and St. Joseph Academy, 
St. Louis High School in Lake Charles, 
St. Joseph Academy and Glen Oaks 
High School in Baton Rouge, Zachary 



High School and Bogalousa High 
School. 

Any graduate of the aforementioned 
high schools who may have some 
helpful suggestions or information 
which would aid the Public Relations 
Program when they visit the schools is 
encouraged to stop by Room 114 in 
Caldwell Hall or call 4414. 

Any student interested in becoming 
part of the Public Reations Program 
should fill out an application which can 
be obtained in the Office of External 
Affairs Room 114, Caldwell Hall. 



by Muffett Richardson 

NSU has begun to set the stage for its 
annual Lady of the Bracelet Beauty 
Pageant (LOB), an official preliminary 
for the Miss Louisiana contest. 

LOB challenges you to "Imagine...," 
that being the very theme in mind for 
the evening. New areas of judging and 
competition to match the revised Miss 
Louisiana and Miss America rules will 
downplay traditional evening gown 
competition with onstage personality 
judging as a novel feature. 

Talent, personality and swimsuit 
competition will result in a winner from 
each category along with a 1976-77 Lady 
of the Bracelet, first, second and third 
runners-up. Trophies and awards go to 
the winners and NSU's "Lady" will 
receive a $150 scholarship from the 

Student Union Governing Board 



(SUGB) , gift certificates from local 
merchants, a crown and, of course, her 
crowning bracelet. 

Entry forms can be picked up in 
Room 214 of the Student Union and 
should be returned to that office before 
the Sept. 22 closing date. Any single, 
full-time female NSU student with a 2.0 
average may enter competition as long 
as she is not graduating this fall. A girl 
may, but is not required to be sponsored 
by a group, club or organization. Entry 
fee is set at $5. 

Each girl accepted will be notified 
within one week after she turns in her 
entry form. An acceptance tea which 
will be the first official meeting is 
scheduled for Sept. 27. 

On Wednesday, Nov. 17, twenty 
contestants will begin their peaceful 
rivalry on stage in the Fine Arts 



Auditorium, which is expected to hold a 
capacity crowd. Curtain time is 7:30 
p.m. Tickets should be purchased at 
least two weeks prior to the pageant in 
the Fine Arts box office. Prices will be 
decided upon and announced at a later 
date. 

Executive Director of LOB is a senior 
Medical Technology student, Betty 
Williamson, who was elected by the 
new SUGB to head this year's pageant. 
She is aided by co-assistant directors 
Ann Bates and Darlene Damico. Miss 
Williamson has been working with LOB 
plans since June and is confident in the 
progress made up to this point. 

Stress is now being placed on getting 
plenty of girls into the competition, 
according to Miss Williamson. She 
added that it is time to promote full 
student participation in this important 
event. 



isive 
ition 



Paper'; 
to * 



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ns 

trust 
, Historic' 

3,000,00<H>«j 
is, diaries J 
mbers ot 

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ested per*^ 
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ication on v 




^ERE IS THE PEACEPIPE?— SGA President Clinton Davis 
^ Senate Chairman Bob Ryder explain the revised SGA 
institution to Senator Danny Dyess, before last weeks 
feting. The document passed unanimously and will be voted 
n by students Oct. 5. 



Elections slated Hot Sauce 



Persons interested in running for 
class senators for the Student Govern- 
ment Association should file in Dr. 
Galloway's office before 4 p. m. next 
Tuesday, Sept. 21. 

Elections will be held the following 
Tuesday, Sept. 28. 
Runoffs will be held Oct. 5. 

Students will also vote on the 
proposed new SGA Constitution on Oct. 
5. 

All candidates for class Senator must 
have an over-all 2.0 grade point 
average. 



Why are commuters assigned to a 
parking lot which is filled with con- 
struction equipment? 

Chief Lee, of University Police, 
answered this question, stating, 
"Under the new parking system, 
commuters can park in quite a few lots, 
including those lots classified as open. 
Of course students can't park in por- 
tions of the lot mentioned, but as soon 
as construction is complete and the 
cranes are removed then parking can 
resume." 

How much money is being generated 
through parking stickers this year, and 
where does this money go? 

A spokesman for University Police 
said that, as of now, there are ap- 
proximately 2500 cars registered. Some 
of these cars however are registered as 



"second cars," which only cost $1.00 to 
register. Dr. Richard Galloway, Vice 
President of Student Affairs estimated 
that between $18,000 and $22,000 would 
be generated by parking stickers this 
year. According to Galloway this 
money goes into a special account for 
road maintenance. 



Fight Song 



Go Demons take the field, 
Northwestern Demons never yield. 
Fight Demons win tonight, 
Victory is on our side. 
Purple & White shall ever reign, 
Filling the air with battle strains, 
So Demons for ever stand & 
fight for dead old Demon Land! 



Opinion Poll 



If you could change one thing at NSU, 
what would it be? 

In a survey taken last week a 
majority of students answered that 
question by saying that they would do 
something about the lack of parking 
space on campus. Mentioned in par- 
ticular was the area surrounding 
Louisiana Hall. 

Runner-up answers to the question 
were longer visitation hours, and better 
upkeep of the campus. Included in the 
latter is doing something about what 
remains of Bienville Hall (the building 
destroyed by fire this summer ) and the 
other abandoned buildings on campus. 



Page 2 CURRENT SAUCE September 14. 1976 



Co 's Corner 



Access to student records defined 
in statement of general policy 

The 



..'IU- 

: ; I have sufficiently 
recovered from the head in- 
jury I sustained while poun- 
ding my cranium against the 
■wall last week. I am happy to 
report that the Hot Tang 
treatment did not impair our 
fearless Sports editor in any 
way. I am worried about Bob 
Ryder though. He keeps 
walking into the office saying, 
"SBA at a glimpse" was so 
much easier." I wonder if the 
job is getting to him. 

Seriously, the Current Sauce 
staff is finally getting settled 
into a rountine and the 
semester promises to keep us 
on our toes. A few upcoming 
events that will be of interest 
to students are the State Fair 
game Oct. 23, Homecoming, 
Nov. 13, Bill Dodd Day, Oct. 9, 
and Lady of the Bracelet, Nov. 

Make a friend 

■ : 

When you want to borrow 
money you visit a good friend. 
When you need advice or you 
have a problem you seek out a 
very good friend. The NSU 
Counseling Center could be 
just the friend you need when 
you have a problem or need 
advice, whether it be 
academic or personal. 

Located in Room 101 of 
Caldwell Hall, the Counseling 
Center, headed by Dr. Robert 
C. Lee, is staffed with trained 
psychologists and counselors 
who are qualified to assist 
students in the areas of 
educational, vocational and 
personnal counseling. 



A counseling center not 
being used serves no useful 
function. Everyone needs 
individual security and the 
NSU Counseling Center offers 
helping relationships on a one- 
to-one basis, confidentiality 
assured. 

Remember, a friend can 
only advise on the basis of his 
experience. The NSU Coun- 
seling Center can go further 
because they are trained to 
handle all types of problems. 

The counselors are 
professionally qualified to 
work with students having 
personal and social ad- 
justment problems; to provide 
marriage and family coun- 
seling; to assist students with 
decisions about courses, 
curricula, and general 
academic and educational 
planning and to assist students 
with decisions regarding 
vocational planning. 

Why not make them one of 
your very good friends? All it 
takes is a telephone call (5246) 
or a short visit to cultivate a 
relationship which could be 
both rewarding and beneficial 
to you. 



SBA at work 

The SBA has rewritten our 
constitution and is presently 
running it in the Current 
Sauce so that students may 
have a chance to read and 
compare the proposed, 
revised constitution with the 
one now being used. 

Each week the document is 
run in the Current Sauce there 



will be a detailed explanation 
of the major changes as to 
what the present constitution 
says, what the new one will 
say and why the revision was 
made. 

Let me quickly point out two 
major areas of change I think 
each student should note 
carefully— Article II dealing 
with the executive branch of 
the SBA and Article V dealing 
the elections board. The 

executive branch will be 
consolidated and necessary 
reforms have been written 
into the election board 
clarifying some of the am- 
biguities and making some of 
the changes suggested by the 
Student Superior Court last 
spring. 

I believe that the proposed, 
revised constitution would 
remedy some of the ambiguity 
of the present one and help the 
SBA become a more efficient 
governing body. 



(Editor's Note: The 
following policy concerning 
the Family Education and 
Privacy Act of 1974 (the 
Buckley Amendment) is the 
official policy of the 
University concerning access 
to and utilization of student 
records. Any questions con- 
cerning this policy may be 
directed to Dr. Richard 
Galloway, vice president of 
affairs.) 



on students pursuant to court 
orders or subpoenas. 

The University recognizes 
research by graduate 
students, faculty, and ad- 
ministrative staff as a fun- 
damental component of its 
overall mission. Occasionally 
such research involves the use 
of students and data extracted 
from student records which is 
essentially confidential. 
Approval to conduct such 



The policy of Northwestern research must first be ob- 

State University with respect tained from the person in 

to the release of information charge of the involved 

on students is based on the discipline. Following this, 



premise that a student's 
record is confidential and 
must be protected from those 
who would use it for other than 
legitimate purposes. At the 
same time, the policy must be 
flexible enough so as not to 
hamper the student, the 



authorization to utilize 
students or student records 
must be obtained from the 
Vice President of Student 
Affairs and-or his authorized 
agent. In such instances the 
office keeping the records 
shall make every effort to 



University, or the community insure the anonymity of 
in the pursuit of legitimate identifying information 

contained in the records 
utilized. 



rwi • • 

1 rivia 



A bit of trivia that will in- 
terest most students: 
November 13 is the date set for 
North western's homecoming. 
The Demons will be pitted 
against USL. The theme for 
this year's Homecoming is 
"Proudly We Hail." A Bicent- 
ennial homecoming is being 
planned. 

Anyone interested in 
working with Homecoming 
should contact Debbie Hebert 
in the Office of External Af- 
fairs, Room 112 or call 4414. 



/ encourage you to enter 



Dear Friends, 
The Student Union Board 
has officially opened the 
"entry" portion of our 1976 
Lady of the Braclet pageant. 
As your reigning Miss Nor- 
thwestern, I would personally 
like to encourage any girls 
interested in the pageant to 
enter. I am very aware of the 
hesitation and uncertainness 
of the prospective entrants 
and I can assure you there was 
no one more hesitant or un- 
certain than I at this time last 
year. I had never had any 
pageant experience before 
and from the moment I was 
nominated til my crowning , 
fear was an everday thing. 



Could I do it? After at- 
tending the first few meetings, 
I discovered that it was really 
fun working with the pageant. 
The excitement mounted 
every day as I prepared my 
talent presentation, decided 
what I was to wear, and saw 
that everyone else's en- 
thusiasm was contagious. 

When I was crowned Miss 
NSU, I never dreamed my 
reigning year would be so 
fantastic. From riding in the 
Christmas parade to being 
named one of the "Top Ten" in 
Miss Louisiana this summer, 
the experience I have had are 
permanently etched in my 
fondest memories. 



I have even been asked to do 
television commercials in 
New Orleans and this stem- 
med from an advertising 
agency seeing my picture in 
the newspaper. 

I can honestly say this year 
as Miss NSU has been the best 
year of my life and the 1976 
crown is open to every girl 
who is interested. 

I sincerely encourage you to 
enter and give it a try— I did 
and I'm so glad I did! 

Hope to see you at the Ac 
ceptance Tea-Sept. 27. 
Cheryl Pureed 
Miss NSU 



Current Sauce 



COLETTE OLDMIXON 

Editor 



BOB RYDER 

Managing Editor 

BILL BOSSIER 

Sports Editor 

PAULA JETTON 

News Editor 

EDITH M. HARRIS 

Assistant News Editor 

OLU AKINRINADE 

Assistant News Editor 



MARK SMITH 

Advertising Manager 

MARK BANDY 

Business Manager 

RODNEYWISE 

Circulation Manager 

MIKE RABALAIS 

Photographer 

FRANKLIN I. PRESSON 

Adviser 



Current Sauce is the official publication of the student body of 
Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, Louisiana. The 
newspaper is entered as second class matter at the Natchitoches Post 
Office under an act of March 3, 1879. 

CurrentSauce is published every Tuesdayduring thefall and spring 
semesters with the exception of holidays and testing periods and bi 
weekly during the summer semester, 1 1 is printed at the Natchitoches 
Times, Highway 1 South, Natchitoches, Louisiana. 

Editorial offices are located in Room 225, Arts and Sciences 
Building and telephones are 357 5456 and 357 4874, Business. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are solely those of the 
student editors and do not necessarily represent the viewpoint of the 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body of Northwestern 

Letters to Hie editor are invited and contributions are solicited from 
students, faculty, and staff and from student organizations. Letters 
must be signed and no more than 500 words to be considered for 
publication. Names will be withheld upon request. 

The staff of Current Sauce reserves the right to edit all letters fo 
sake of journalistic style and available space. 



Reader's 
Comment 



Dear Editor, 

It seems that sometime 
about two years ago we were 
faced with an energy crisis. 
The faculty and staff en- 
couraged students and 
residents to turn off lights 
when not in use, turn off ap- 
pliances, don't be wasteful 
and conserve energy. Well, 
the students and residents 
have done their part and are 
still doing their part of con- 
serving energy. But what 
about the faculty and staff??? 

Why is it that between the 
hours of 9 a. m. and 4 p. m. 
Monday through Friday, you 
can walk through the floors of 
the Arts and Science building 
and find approximately 90 
percent of the unoccupied 
rooms with the lights still on. 

What are they doing to 
conserve and save us from the 
persistent rising cost of 
utilities. Why do we have to 
continue to pay these high 
costs when with a little effort 
from the faculty and staff 
these costs can be reduced. 
Then, these funds can be 
utilized elsewhere. 

Gary L. Brown 



endeavors. 

Written authorization 
Student records are con- 
fidential. Release of in- 
formation on students or- 
dinarily will be made only on 
the written request or 
authorization of the student 
himself. This applies with 
equal force to the issuance of 
transcripts. Telephone 
requests for transcripts will 
not be honored nor will 
requests for transcripts be 
honored which have been 
made by the parent, spouse or 
prospective employer of an 
adult student except on 
authorization from the 
student. The parent of a 
student under eighteen years 
of age may, however, be 
provided a copy of such 
student's transcript for his or 
her own use on written 
request Similarly, in keeping 
with recognized practices, 
transcripts may be issued on 
written requests to institutions 
from which a student has 
graduated or transferred; 
institutions to which a student 
transfers, or to organizations 
which sponsor a student 
provided the student concurs 
in the request. 

Release of information 

Ordinarily, the only in- 
formation furnished inquirers 
concerning students will be 
material contained in the 
student telephone directory. If 
a student chooses not to have 
Us name listed in the student 
directory his name will be 
omitted and mis information 
will not be furnished to those 
making inquiries. 

The University only 
maintains such records on 
students as are necessary for 
the efficient, effective and 
expedient conduct of business. 
Inasmuch, then, as such 
records are maintained 
primarily for intramural use, 
information contained 
student records will 
released to outside 
vestigating agencies only on 
the written consent of the 
student subject of an in- 
vestigation. Once consent has 
been received by the 
University, information 
requested from academic 
records of students, students' 
permanent folders (con- 
taining admissions creden- 
tials, transcripts, etc.), and 
students' personnel records 
may be released to properly 
identified investigators 
through authorized staff 
personnel in the Office of the 
Vice President of Student 
Affairs. Investigators must 
adequately identify them- 
selves through the display of 
official credentials, indicate 
the agency they represent and 
demonstrate a satisfactory 
basis for their request, such as 
a background investigation 
for prospective employment. 
Even as to investigating 
agencies, information in 
student records will be 
withheld if the student does 
not want his records reviewed. 
When such a request is made 
the Vice President of Student 
Affairs, on being notified, will 
make those measures to in- 
sure that the student's request 
is not breached. The 
University, of course, is 
obliged to provide information 



in 
be 
in- 



Records of disciplinary 
action taken by the University 
against students are main- 
tained for intramural pur- 
poses, hence, information 
relating thereto should be 
released to inquirers only on 
written authorization of 
students concerned. However, 
notices of suspension for non- 
academic reason will continue 
to be shown on the official 
transcript, will be a per- 
manent part of the transcript, 
and will be governed by the 
same release-authorization 
requirements as the total 
transcript. 

Academic records 

Individual faculty members 
may review academic records 
of their students to the extent 
that such review is in the 
service of legitimate 
educational interests. 

Types of educational records 

At least once a year Nor- 
thwestern State University 
will publish in the student 
newspaper, The Current 
Sauce, and the Alumni 
Columns, and have com- 
municated over the student 
radio station KNWD, the fact 
that certain records are kept 
on students and that these 
records are available to 
students and that the students 
may have the right to 
challenge the contents of these 
records. The types of 
educational records that are 
kept on students at Nor- 
thwestern State University 
are as follows: 

1. Instructors: A record is 
maintained on each student by 
the instructor. Such things as 
attendance, test grades, 
reports, etc., are kept by toe 
instructor in a Class Record 
Book. The instructor treats 
the materials in the Class 
Record Book in a confidential 
manner and a student's marks 
in the class can only be 
divulged to the student. At the 
end of the semester, the Class 
Record Book is turned in to the 
Registrar's office where it is 
kept for five years and then 
destroyed. 

2. Academic Deans: Each 
academic dean keeps in his 
office the matriculation 
records of the student as well 
as the curricula being 
followed by each student. Only 
material pertaining to a 
student's matriculation is kept 
in these records, as well as his 
academic standing. Some 
incidental materials are kept, 
such as newspaper articles, 
honors, a supervising 
teacher's evaluation of a 
student teacher, etc. No one 
has access to these records 
except the Dean or his agent. 
Should a student change 
colleges within the University 
his record is then transferred 
in its entirety to his new Dean. 
These records are unofficial 
and can be reviewed in the 
Academic Dean's office. 
These records are to be kept 
ten years and then destroyed. 



the academic department 
head may designate one of the 
faculty members within his 
department to act as the 
advisor to the student. If the 
student changes majors, this 
record is transferred to his 
new adviser. The material 
contained in this record is only 
of an academic nature, in- 
dicating the past and present 
matriculation record, his 
current academic status, as 
well as the curriculum in 
which the student is enrolled. 
Only the academic advisor 
has access to this record and it 
can be reviewed by the 
student in the academic ad- 
visor's office. These records 
are unofficial. These records 
are placed in an inactive 
status if the student interrupts 
his education and destroyed in 
ten years after the student 
leaves the University. 

4. The Dean of Student 
Personnel: The Dean of 
Student Personnel maintains 
records with most of the 
personal identifying material 
on a student. The file contains 
the personal data form, as 
well as the student's 
autobiography that he or she 
has written in orientation 
class, his dormitory progress 
reports, housing data, and 
past matriculation records, as 
well as the current curriculum 
in which the student is 
enrolled, test data from the 
American College Testing 
program, and any 
correspondence that may 
have taken place between the 
student and members of his 
department, as well as 
miscellaneous administrative 
reports. The record may also 
contain records of any past 
disciplinary problems or 
disciplinary action that may 
have been brought against the 
student. The student can 
review this record in the Dean 
of Student Personnel's office. 
Only authorized Student Af- 
fairs' staff have access to 
these records. The records are 
destroyed five years a/te; the 
student leaves the University. 



9. Counseling Service 
Records: Information con- 
tained in student records 
which are maintained by the 
various University counseling 
services are strictly con- 
fidential and released to 
requesting agencies or in- 
dividuals other than 



her adviser, academic <v 

anH nthar * 



Stud, 



and other author 
university personnel 
cerned with the 
Scores are not release 
anyone, other than tk, 
authorized University 
sonnel, except on a req Ue ^ 



Sign 
Sigma T 
pannounc 
apewmeml: 

IV 

Challenging student r - ,nond 

et «i [anerata, 

Northwestern St» Digil" rmo 



>(addox, 



the student. These recon^ 
University professional staff destroyed after ten y ears 
only on the written request of 
a student or former student. 
These records are destroyed 
five years after the student 
leaves the University. 
Students cannot review the 
materials in these records, but 
his personal physician or 
other appropriate professional 
persons may review these 
records. 



10. Director of Student 
Services: Records on Student 
Body Association Loans, 
agency loans, and student 
insurance are kept in the 
office of the Director of 
Student Services. No one has 
access to these records except 
the Director of Student Ser- 
vices or his agent. Students 
may review these records in 
the Director of Student Ser- 
vices' office. 



5. Student Infirmary: The 
student who enrolls full-time 
in the University is required to 
furnish a medical 
examination report which nbt 
only includes a current 
medical examination prior to 
the student's entrance to the 
University, but the student's 
past medical history prior to 
admission to the University. 
Records are kept on medical 
problems reported by the 
student as well as treatment 
procedures. The only people 
who have access to these 
records are the University 
physicians and nurses. Every 
effort is made to protect the 
physician-patient relationship 
and to safeguard all con- 
fidences. The student cannot 
review these records but his 
personal physician, acting in 
his behalf, can review the 
records. 

6- The Vice President of 
Student Affairs: The records 
kept by the Vice President of 
Student Affairs are the 
students' home address, the 
students' school address, the 
students' grades of ' the 
previous semester, and the 
student's class schedule. 

7 - Registrar: The 
Registrar's Office is the 
keeper of the official 
academic records of the 
student here at the University 
The Student's application for 
admission to the University 
and other materials of an 
academic nature are kept in 
this office. The academic 
records in the Registrar's 
Office are permanent. The 
student can review his or her 
record in that office. 



11. Placement Office: 
Records are kept in the 
Placement Office for those 
students who register and are 
in need of assistance in finding 
jobs. The student's record is 
released only to those 
organizations or individuals 
authorized by the student to 
have the material contained in 
the placement folder. The 
student can review the 
material in the placement 
folder, including letters of 
reference, if he has not waived 
his right to review these let- 
ters of reference. If the 
student waives his rights to 
review the letters of 
reference, this request can 
only be reinstated if those who 
wrote the recommendations 
agree. Placement records are 
kept for an todefinite period of 
time. When, in the opinion of 
the placement officer, the 
student can no longer be 
adequately served by having 
this placement record 
properly maintained they are 
destroyed at the discretion of 
the placement officer. 

, 12. Veterans' Affairs Office: 
Military service records on all 
veterans receiving assistance 
from the Veterans' Ad- 
ministration are kept in the 
Veterans' Administration 
office. The student veteran 
has a right to review these 
records with the Coordinator 
of the Office of Veterans' 
Affairs. 

13. Department of Testing: 
The Department of Testing 
maintains a record of test 
scores submitted to the 
University, and the results of 
the University's Advanced 
Standing Examination and the 
English Proficiency 
Examination for doctoral 
students. These records are 
available to the student, his- 



Pr 



University shall prov 
students and-or parents ' 
opportunity for a hearin, ,eff J Sta P ] 

challenge toe contentT? t S y 
student's educational rec 0r 
in order to insure that ( New off 
records are not inaceuj.|Se mester 
misleading, or otherwise 3 ° nnie Ke 
violation of privacy or n .k fmember 
rights of students 
provide an opportunity formation 
correction or deletion of ^retary-J 
such inaccurate, mislead 
or otherwise inapproprj, Officers 
data contained therein. ^ jedge clas 
University will attempt Ienny Tayl 
settle disputes with studeo ieff S ' a| 
and-or parents regarding tj reasure T 
content of the stiJif 63 " 1 
education records throug 
informal meetings ai Sg Tau \ 
discussions. In the event th* lack and h 
informal proceedings do ni > successfi 
satisfy the student and< Sg Tau's 
parent a more forrai re woody 
arrangement for a hearin Burdin, Ru 
may be necessary. When thy 
informal means are n< ^ J^ 8 
satisfactory to the stude. 5 ™ J Zu 
and-or parent or tb^rybody 
University, these formitave a 
proceedings will be conductejiemester. 
accordingly. On the writl 
request of the student anik 
parent to the Universit 
concerning the inaccuracy o 
materials contained in tb 
student's record, a boan 
composed of the Vice 
President of Student Affairs,# nive f 
representative of the Facult] tasoci atioi 
Senate, a representative of to mler bv B< 
Dean's Council, and i 11 August 
representative of the heads »| ,ere Dve 
academic departments will MBoyd, Dr 
convened to hear the con| i>llIlcn - 
plaints and to make i q Davis 
recommendation " "to Me Je|f cQn 

President of the University.!,.. „. 
o . „ . . 'Italendar, 

Hearings shall be conducted) 

and decided within »'^ P 1 US ' f n 

reasonable period of time} p 3 

following the request for to 

hearing. The hearing shall be 

conducted and the decision 

rendered by the Board tf 

enumerated above. If one 

the Board members is ttH 

volved in the case in question,. ' 

the President of the Univer^ gesledtt 

sity will select an individuil repaying 1 

who does not have a direct for loans 

interest in the outcome of to 

hearing. The student and- or 

the parent or the University i* 

to be affored a full and fsf 

opportunity to 

evidence relevant to the issu* 

raised and the decision srJ 

be rendered in writing to «* 

President of the University for 

his approval within 

reasonable period of tin* 

after the conclusion of "* 

hearing and his decision 

be communicated to 



The Nor 



Cecil K 
glides of 
Rested ti 



fear. Dr. 
Hggested 
« audited. 

NEV 



i vrill 
the 



parties involved 
reasonable time. 



within 



3. Academic Advisors: At 
Northwestern State 
University the academic 
advisor is generally 
designated as the academic 
department head, although 



8. Financial Aids Office: All 
students who are receiving 
scholarships, loans from state 
and federal sources, or who 
are student workers and 
receive some financial 
assistance through the 
University have records that 
are kept in this office. The 
student can review all 
records. 




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:c *U Ach 

J*e> Stout 
Nicies w, 
^eals ( 
'idering 



^V* *"»**«£: Shiny. 
SKIN CONDITION: Oily. 



MASK APPEARANCE: Dull. MASK APPEARANCE 
«tL ?o5-.... (no flams or shine)- 

SKIN CONDITION: Dry, flaky SKIN CONDITION: Mr"* 




P&C REXALL DRUGS 

U6 T0ULINE 352-2355 



d 



r. academic 4 

personnel ! 

not reL 
ther than 
University ft 

^ on a r equesi 
These records 
fter ten ye ars * 

I student 



'eased 
Hi 



r «c 0( 

estern Sl| 

/ ha » Prov, 
nd-or parents 

f °r a hearinc 

iucational rec 0r 
) insure that 
e not inaccitf.lie'nester 
or otherwisj %J > 
privacy or oth j 
students and 



^rate, misleadjj 
se inapproprj, 
ned therein 



nts 



September 14 1975 CURRENT SAUCE Page 3 



As TTK^ 
ASA — 

^ Z4>B 



Greek Review — 



E 



NSU Rush can Be Fun 



I 



Sigma Tau Gamma 

Sigma Tau Gamma is proud uke tQ atu]ate their 28 
.announce the pledgmg of 16 pled whkh are Rand 

C m I ey , a ^ eVe Bonnette, Raymond Nugeant, 

T' Zl H rt0n ' ^ Mark C °t«en, Hays Toun, 
pond Beaudoin, Ron 



#nerata, Jim Dennis, P.J. 
pjgilormo, Bill Land, Joe 
>(addox, Mike Majjorie, 
Buddy Price, John Skinner, 
Jeff Staples, Emery Toms, 
Sandy Walker, and James 



New 



officers for the fall 

are President 

Ronnie Kern; vice president 

^membership Kade Bardin; 

rice president of management 

.Tim Cain; vice president of 
)pportunityf 0rMucation . wmie ^ and 

)r deletion of (iEC retary-Joe Bananno. 



Officers elected in the 
idge class are president- 
will attempt 5enny Ta y lor ; vice president- 
tes with studen |eff Staples; secretary 
regarding « ieasurer " aay Guess and 

the «T ant * armS ~ P J - 

records t^™' 

meetings a „ Sg Tau welcomes everyone 
In the event thei i» ck and hopes everyone had 
oceedings do n,i successful rush week. 

Sg Tau's newest members 



formijre woody Gordy and Frank 
rdin, Ruff-Ruff. 

Kappa Sigma 

The brothers of Kappa 

a would like to welcome 
iverybody back and hope they 
enjoyable 
would also 



student andu 

more 
t for a 
ssary. When thea 
neans are n< 

to the si 
irent or th 

these formiiave a real 
will be conductejanester. They 

On the writta 
>e student an<k 
the Universit; 
he inaccuracy 
ontained in tl 
ecord, a boai 

of the ViceL rhe North western State 
Student Affairs, fversity Student Body 
re of the Facultf sociation was called to 
resentative of tW"* 1 * DV Bob Ryder at 6:37 p. 
uncil, and f- Au *?ust 31, 1976. Absent 
'e of the heads i ,ere Dyess, McCormick.. 
jartmentswillbejM. Drener, Ball, and 

hear the conJ Punch. 
I to make 1 
atioh " 16 'tie,. 



John Breedlove, Landy Hall, 
Chris Henry, Mark Mathews, 
Edgar Procell, Russell 
Timmer, Jerry Walker, Will 
Freeland, Mike Guilliams, 
Steve Sullivan, Tim Davis, 
Jamie Sanders, Randy 
Mondello, Frank Cicero, Jeff 
Gaff, Stan Tyler, Freddy 
Wiggins, Dennis Mayeaux, 
Evin McCullan, Tom Barton, 
Mike Manuel, Wesley 
Sullivan, Gerry Easley, and 
Tim Hobson, Elected to serve 
as pledge trainers for the year 
are Terry Downs, John 
Breland, and Jay Garcia. 

The chapter recently held a 
chapter exchange with the 
sisters of Phi Mu at T and B 
plantation. We would like to 
thank all the Phi Mu's for the 
good time. We are currently 
planning future exchanges 
with out sororities. 

We would like to wish Coach 
A.L. Williams and the rest of 
the Demons good luck this 
Saturday against Stephen F. 
Austin. We would especially 
like to wish good luck to our 
brothers on the team Bobby 
Kirchoff, Jack Britain, Alison 
Scott and Randy Bonnette. We 
are having a victory dance 
following the game with music 



provided by Southern Com- 
fort. Plans are also in the 
making for the annual Tech 
Weekend by Social Chairman 
Terry Downs. 

The Kappa Sigma football 
team has been hard at work 
preparing for the intramural 
season. We are undefeated 
last yearand plan on going all 
the way again this year. The 
team is lead by Coach 
Bouncing Bill Stewart. 



Omega Psi Phi 

The Brothers of the Omega 
Psi Phi Fraternity are off to a 
good start this school year. On 
Saturday, Sept. 4, the chapter 
painted and repaired the floor 
at the J.S. Clark Nursery on 
Fifth St. The chapter pur- 
chased paint, floor tile and 
plywood to repair the worn-out 
floor. 

The Theta Delta Chapter of 
the Omega Psi Phi fraternity 
held their annual fall "Rush 
Party" at the Bayou Jacko 
Amigo Room on Wednesday, 
Sept. 1. About 40 young men 
attended the rush and enjoyed 
every minute of it. 

The Theta Delta chapter has 
14 actives returning this 
semester. Newly elected of- 
ficers are Marvin Roque, 



bosileus; Jerry Richardson 
vice bosileus; James Smash, 
keeper of records and seals; 
Albert Sibley, keeper of 
finances; Gary Richards, 
chapter chaplian; Wendell 
Robinson, keeper of peace; 
and Mitchell Gray, reporter. 

On the weekend of Sept. 18, 
the Theta Delta chapter is 
planning a chapter reunion for 
the first Demon home football 
game. Some 30 alumni are 
expected to return to the old 
"Alma Mater." A dinner at 
the Holiday Inn is planned 

The Theta Delta chapter 
would also like to invite 
everyone to the "Disco Tec" 
held every Friday and 
Saturday night at Bayou 
Jacko's Amigo Room, The 
time for the event is 8:30 p.m. 
to 2:30 a.m. The admission is 
$1 per person. 



Robert Shaver and Steve 
Sloan. After completing all of 
his pledge requirements and 
correctly answering the P.Q., 
Willfrid Gregoire was suc- 
cessfully initiated into Tau 
Kappa Epsilon. 

The TKE's of NSU would 
like to welcome everyone back 
to school and good luck with 
your classes. 

PhiMu 

Prior to rush week on 
Saturday, August 21, Kappa 
Iota chapter of Phi Mu 
initiated Teri Wilson and Ann 
Wommack. Then after a week 
of parties, fun and hard work 
the following girls accepted 
bids from Phi Mu: Lane Ben- 
son, Jennifer Briggs, Vickie 
Carbo, Kelly Crowell, Liz 
Dyer, Tammy Gauthier, Toni 
Genova, Janice Hargis, Marie 
Hebert, and Gwen Hidalgo. 

Also, Beth Hill, Maggie 
Horton, Pan Lucky, Robin 
McDonald, Pan Meek, Robin 
Rose, Vickie Smith, Carla 



Here's a Rush, there's a 
Rush everywhere a Rush! 
Rush! 01' Northwestern had 
fall rush - e-yi— e-yi-yo ! ! 

Seventy-seven of NSU's 
coeds who have accepted 
invitations as fall semester 
pledges are in the university's 
four national social sororities. 

The 77 sorority pledges were 
selected during the universi- 
ty's Sorority Rush Week 
program, which was con- 
ducted during the opening 
week of the fall semester. 

Phi Mu and Delta Zeta 
sororities each had 22 coeds 
listed as fall semester 
pledges; Sigma Sigma Sigma 
announced that 19 coeds ac- 
cepted its invitations and 
Sigma Kappa reported 14 
pledges. 

Mrs. Mamie B. Trunzler, 
coordinator of orientation and 

rganization at NSU stated that 
Open Rush at NSU began Aug. 
28 and will continue 
throughout the academic 
year. 

All four of Northwestern's 
national social sororities are 
members of the National 
Panhellenic Council. 

The following coeds are 
pledges in national social 



PHI MU 

Marie Benson, Jennifer 
Briggs, Marie Hebert and 
Gwen Hidalgo, Opelousas; 
Vickie Carbo, Marrero; Kelly 
Crowell, Slidell; Elizabeth 
Dyer, Kay Tuminello, Baton 
Rouge; Tammy Gauthier, 
Cottonport; Toni Genova, Lori 
Williams, Alexandria; Janis 
Hargis, Elizabeth Hill, 
Pamela Lucky, Natchitoches; 
Margaret Horton, Robin Rose, 
Cindy White, Shreveport; 
Robin McDonald, Jonesboro; 
Diane McKellar, Bossier City; 
Pamela Neck, Mansura; 
Vickie Smith, Jonesville ; 
Carla Stagg, Kinder. 

SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 

Vicki Adams, Debra 
McHalffey, Shreveport; Pam 
Buxton, St. Amant; Kim Cole, 
Bossier City; Edna Davis, 
Jonesville; Kathy Gresham, 
Houston; Theresa Hebert, 
Karen Thompson, Jennings; 
Susan Heintz, Vicki Kitchin, 
Covington; Catherine 
Holland, Debbie Vil;ard, 
Alexandria; Tracy Loyd, Beth 
Morrow, Natchitoches; 
Melany Mydland, Lynn 



Washington; Lisa Bobo, Julie 
Breazeale, Nanette 
Hawthorne, Natchitoches; 
Melissa Canik, Bossier City; 
Donelle Dupree, Baton 
Rouge; Dawn Graham, 
Moreauville; Bernadine 
Lanclos, Lake Charles; Sally 
Mann, Westlake; Kathleen 
Moore, Shreveport; Debra 
Plunkett, Alexandria; Gwen 
Teekell, Blacksburg, Va.; 
Vivian Lee Williams, 
DeRidder, and Rebecca Wood, 
Barksdale, AFB. 

DELTA ZETA 
Lee Ann Blaufuss, Amy 
Cupit, Heidi Jo Dobbins, 
Debbie Stephens, Carrie Yore, 
Bossier City; Donna Marie 
Bray, Lake wood Calif.; Susan 
Bulmer, Marrero; Penny 
Burch, Opelousas; Pitty 
Cathey, Helen Hubley, Patti 
Louise Salley, Shreveport; 
Deborah Cosand, DeRidder; 
Barbara Joan Dillingham, 
Barksdale AFB; Aimee 
Dowdell, Morgan City; 
Charlotte Lynne Gary, 
Houma; Beverly Henley, 
Gonzales; Wendy Mau, 
Metairie; Betty Jo Shoun, 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 

The Epsiion-Upsilon 
Chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon 
is proud to announce the 
receiving into pledgeship in 
the following new members: 
Mike Anyan, Chuck Bennett, 
Chuck Preston, Tom Preston, 



Stagg, Kay Tuminello, Cindy sororit ies at Northwestern 
White, and Lori Williams. ^ g £ a jj. 

Saturday afternoon after 
bids were issued the Phi Mu's 
treated the new pledges to 
lunch at Pizza Inn. 

After the pledging 
ceremony on Sunday morning, 
August 28, the entire chapter 
attended mass at the Church 
of Immaculate Conception. 



Waller, Zachary; Tammy Bunkie; Karen Steinmetz, 
Premeaux, Gueydan; Seabrook, Tex.; Cindy 
Rebecca Smith, metairie, and Stewart, River Ridge; 
Gwendolyn Smith, Houma. Patricia Ann Talambas, 
SIGMA KAPPA Alexandria, and Frean Wise, 

Claudia Blanchard Minden. 



SB A at a Glance 



C Davis reported on the 
„ »e» constitution, SGA 

Bd within CT' and Student access to 
period of ttae| aaplain,s ^ 
request for the 

hearing shall W OLD BUSINESS 

id the decision p 

^ ,l*cil Knotts discussed 

j Nicies of student loans and 
Rested that long term loans 
* upped to $50.00. He also 
Rested that persons late in 



the Board 
above. If one of 
nembers is ifr 
case in question, 
. of the Univtf 
ct an individual 
t have a direct 
; outcome of the 
student and- of 
the University » 

a full and ftf 
to present 
rant to the issue 
e decision shaD 
n writing to the 
ie University W 
al within • 
eriod of tin* 



^paying loans be ineligible 
for loans for one scholastic 
year. Dr. Richard Galloway 
suggested that the loan fund 
audited. 

NEW BUSINESS 

Ryder discussed Resolution 
"o 1 which states "...Be it 
''solved that the NSU Student 
G °v't. Association Student 
ate should commend 



lclusion of *pator Kelly and thank him 
m , 

tier 1 ' taking such a stand for the 
Ived within i ^nts of Northwestern, (in 
*8ard to his stand on selling 

^6r on campus). Motion 
"lade by Ryder to accept 
'Solution, seconded by 
Jo, mson. Resolution passed. 



lis decision «f 
icated to 



tie. 




moved to accept the 
resolution, Johnson seconded. 
Resolution passed. 

Resolution No. 3 was then 
discussed, stating, "... be it 

resolved that the Student Body 
Association henceforth be re- 
ferred to as the Student 
Government Association until 

such time as the latter name 
can be incorporated into 
current constitutional 
revision." Motion was made to 
accept this by Johnson, sec- 
onded by McKellar. Motion 
passed. 

Ryder discussed Bill No. 3 
which states "... be it resolved 
that the Student Senate of 
Northwestern State 
University does urge and 
request Dr. Kilpatrick to look 

into the road maintenance 
system at Northwestern State 
so that ... problems might be 
rectified. Ryder moved to 
accept, Pittard seconded, 
motion carried. 

C. Davis announced that 
Executive Council would meet 
Wednesday, Sept. 1 to discuss 
final draft of new constitution. 

Nugent moved to adjourn. 
McKellar seconded. Meeting 
adjourned at 7:30 p. m. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Debbie Page 
Senate Clerk 



Dreher, Ball, 
Teiambus. 



Punch and 



» Davis 

ution No. 2 stating ". 



Mask 

th 

ful skin. 

you whe re 



•PEARANCE: 0«»' 
s or shine)- 



The Senate of Northwestern 
discussed State University met on Sept. 
„ting" be 6 ' 1976, ^ meetin 8 was 
Resolved "that" the Student caUed to order b * 
Government Association of Bob Ryder at 6:35 p. m. Ab- 
sent were McCormick, Rains, 

'."rthwestern State 
"versity of Louisiana does 
!e and request Dr. Richard 

l^oway and the Admissions, 
^its and Graduation 
Umittee to recognize the 
r*t Achievements of Mr. 

Stout and waive current 
^cies which prevent the 
. pe als committee from 
"aidering his case." Pittard 

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Downs discussed budget and 
reported that legal budget 
would be known in two weeks. 
C. Davis presented a letter 
from Cecil Knotts concerning 
loan terms. Walker reported 
on Student Services, Lynch 
reported on SUGB projects, 
Martin and Haynes discussed 
the elections. 

OLD BUSINESS 

C. Davis discussed new 
resolutions on loan terms 
which provided that 1) 
maximum amount of short 
term loans be increased from 
$25.00 to $50.00, and 2) Those 
persons late in repaying loans 
cannot take out another loan 
for one calendar year. 

NEW BUSINESS 

Dyess moved to accept 
resolutions of loan terms, 
Jonson seconded. Motion 
passed unanimously. 

Dyess discussed Resolution 

No. 4 which states " 

Therefore be it resolved that 
NSU SGA does urge and 
request that Mr. Wilson and 
the SUGB again provide 
television on the first floor of 
the Student Union." Dyess 

moved to accept resolution. B. 
Lane seconded. Roll call 
requested by Dyess. Lynch 
moved not to make Senate roll 
call for vote. Johnson 
seconded. Motion withdrawn. 



Dyess 

Johnson 

Lane 

Lynch 

McKellar 

Nugent 

Page 

Pittard 

Thompson 

Baham 

Boyd 



yes 

abstain vote requested. Bill passed - 
yes unanimously, 
yes Johnson moved to adjourn, 
yes Nugent seconded. Meeting 
yes adjourned at 7:40 p. m. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Debbie Page 
Senate Clerk 




yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 



SO THIS IS ART!— This seems to be 
the question as art major Cheryl 
Purcell of Marrero, (who is also the 
reigning Miss Northwestern State 
University), and NSU assistant 




professor of art Robert Rector view 
an exhibit of drawings produced by 
nine of Louisiana's most innovative 
artists. The exhibit will run through 
Sept. 17 in the Arts Center . 



Lynch discussed BUI No. 5 
which read, "...therefore be it 
resolved that the Student 
Senate of NSU does urge and 
request Dr. Kilpatrick to 
include this (Mardi Gras) 
holiday in the Spring 
Semester, 1977. Nugent moved 
to accept bill, Boyd seconded, 
bill passed unanimously. 

Pittard moved that students 
vote on Mardi Gras in first 
election. Nugent seconded. 
Motion passed. 

Lane discussed parking 
problem of Louisiana Dorm. 
Problem was referred to 
Traffic and Safety com- 
missions. 

Dyess discussed time of the 
closing of men's gym and the 
cafeteria line. Boyd discussed 
insect problem in cafeteria. 



Senate Bill No. 4, the 

proposed new constitution of 

SGA was then discussed by C. 

„ Davis. McKellar moved to 
Dyess agam requests roll call accept m constitution at one 



vote. Roll call vote taken. 

Resolution passed with 11 in 
favor of and one abstention- 
C.Davis ves 



time. Nugent 
Motion passed. 



seconded. 



Nugent moved to accept Bill 
No. 4, Lane seconded. Roll call 




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PLEASE GIVE. NAME, DORM OR HOUSE, AND ROOM NUMBER. LOCAL CHECKS ACCEPTED 

W.TH STUDENT I.D. LA DRIVER S LICENSE pR|mE % ^ ^y^lLABLE FREE 



Page 4 CURRENT SAUCE September 14. 197G 



Nineteen enrolled in program 



by Marvin Horton 

Nineteen recent high school 
graduates from across the 
state are participating this fall 
in the President's Leadership 
Program for Freshmen at 
Northwestern State 
University. 

Students chosen as the 
program's first participants 
are exploring in depth the 
various aspects of student 
activities and university 
structures during their fresh- 
man year at Northwestern. 

The program, which had 48 
student applications, is 
designed to recognize 
leadership abilities in superior 
incoming freshmen students 
and to encourage continued 
particpation as campus lea- 
ders. 



involved in high school in 
various activities and this 
program tends to try and 
obtain their interest and keep 
it active while in college, 
according to Mary Lynn 
Williamson who is assisting 
Dean Bosarge with the 
program. 

The students meet three 
times a week for one hour and 
no academic hours are 
received for their par- 
ticipation. Each student is 
awarded a 30 hour work study 
fund ($200) per semester for 
participating in the program. 
All of the students were 
honored to be selected to take 
part in this program. 

Tim D. Davis, former 
president of Airline Student 
Body and presently a Business 



The nineteen students Administration major said the 
selected to participate in the program will assist him in 
program were chosen by a 
committee which consisted of 
students, faculty and staff 
members. Fred C. Bosarge, 
dean of student personnel, 
served as chairman of the 
selection committee. Out of 
the nineteen selected, 
eighteen of the students still 
remain with the program. 

According to Bosarge, each 
applicant was screened on the 
basis of a balanced record of 
scholastic achievement and 
service to his high school. 
Personal interviews were also 
conducted as part of the 
selected process. 

"We believe we have found 
eighteen strong students who 
desire to become efficient and 
participate as student leaders 
throughout their university 
career," said Bosarge. 

Program participants will 
be exploring such activities 
and structures as the SGA, 
SUGB, Association of Men and 
Women Students, Current 
Sauce, KNWD radio station, 
external and academic af- 
fairs. 

In addition to exploring 
these areas, the students will 
attend workshops and 
seminars which will cover 



accomplishing greater 
leadership in life. 

Linda D. Dees, former 
social Studies president and 
Speech Club vice-president is 
presently majoring in Interior 
Design. She said, "My goal is 
to live my life as richly as 
possible in order that others 
may use it as an example in 
their lives." 

The President's Leadership 
Program at NSU will assist 
outstanding freshmen 
students in promoting their 
potential leadership qualities 
and developing effective 
leadership skills. 

"Through direct par- 
ticipation in activities on 
campus and class seminars," 

said Bosarge, "our program 
aims to increase un- 
derstanding of the university 
structure and promote 



tne university 



leadership in 
community." 

Students participating in the 
prigram are Connie Bennett, 
Simpson; Carla S. Stagg, 

Kinder; Twila J. Stafford, 
Zachary; Valerie A. Sledge, 
Hammond; Dale L. Sibley, 
Leesville; Theresa A. Rudd, 

Dodson; Pamela Sue Buxton, 
St. Amant; Robert F. Chau- 
vin, Gretna; Kelly A. Crowell 
and Elizabeth A. Richardson, 
Shreveport; Tim D. Davis,' 

Bossier City; Linda D. Dees, 
Oakdale; Ted E. Duggan m, 
Alexandria; Diana L. Floyd, 

Robeline; Irene G. Boux, 
Crowley; Charlotte L. Gray, 
Houma; Faith C. Honold, 
Gretna, and Charles E. Reed, 
Mittie. 



1 













S « 









PRESIDENT'S LEADERSHIP PROGRAM— 
Students participating this year in the President's 
Leadership Program for Freshmen at NSU are 
(from left) Twila Stafford. Zachary; Valerie 
Sledge. Hammond; Dale Sibley. Leesville; 
Theresa Rudd, Dodson; Elizabeth Richards 
n, Shreveport; Charles Reed, Grant; Faith 
Honold, Marrero: Charlotte Gary, Bourg; Irene 
Foux. Crowley; Diana Floyd, Robeline; Ted 



Lj 



fhe year o: 
j[ to a sha 
jjnar Card 
virions a 
,turday ni§ 
pas. 

Untimely 
Lple of mi 
Lnpered th< 
Kempt to \ 
Uier again 

The Derru 
Ljsession of 
Lke a first 
Lit to Lan 
Lgraft got 
ard punt, 
^turned the 
pon Cunni 
ordinals, 
penalties beg 
pemons. 



Potpourri announces schedule 



THE ARMY CAN 
Members of the 
Leadership Program 



v 

BE FUN!— 
President's 
seem to be 



NSU faculty members and 
students are requested to 
make appointments this week 
for yearbook pictures, ac- 
cording to Patsy Black, 
Potpourri editor, and Ezra 
Adams, adviser. 

"We're doing our best to 
inform both faculty and 
students about this," the 
editor said, adding that 
posters, news stories and ads 
in the Current Sauce and on 
KNWD, and memoranda to 
faculty and students are being 
used to inform everyone. 



Adams said that this is the 
first time appointments have 
been used for yearbook pic- 
tures at NSU in recent years, 
and the first time faculty and 
student photos have been 
made by the same 
photographers. 

"We hope this will be an 
improvement for everyone, 
and will result in more faculty 
members and students having 
their pictures made for the 
yearbook than in past years," 
Adams said. 

He added that another new 



Duggan III. Alexandria; Linda Dees. Oakdale 
Tim Davis. Bossier City; Kellv Crowell' 
Shreveport; Robert Chauvin. Harvey; «Connj e 
Bennett. Simpson, and Carla Stagg. Kinder. Not 

shown are Pamela Buston. Gonzales, and Marie Af ter some 
Hebert, Opelousas. At right is program coor- W ^ lhe 
dinator Fred C. Bosarge, dean of student pe r . iced a 
sonnel. juation at 

— ~. ]obby Kirch 

jive the Lan 
jfst down st 
je Demons 
be play 

element in taking "class you must have your 



3p« Two v 

pictures" this year is the fact pouitment card when you ^ 
that students will receive their for the sitting. Come soon for a narterback 
proofs from the photographer better choice of appointment r a loss of 
to choose one for inclusion in times." f ou i 
the Potpourri. "There is no charge for «sessed age 

The photographers will be having your picture made for pt toe ball c 
shooting pictures, by appoint- the yearbook," she added. >* ^ next 
ment, from 9-5 (except the Appointments are bein| tony Pendl£ 
noon hour) Monday through made this week, 8-4 daily, by* 13 ^ 6 for 
Friday for two weeks, Sept. 20 the POTPOURRI staff in tbi |louchdo, 

Student Union lobby. Tbt In the seco 
staff decided to move the 1 ™ " 5 a PP 
location from the yearbook me oKens 
office, Rm. 227 Arts anaf 8 as ***** 
Bldg 



through Oct. 1, in Rooms 314 
and 315, Student Union. 

"In making appointments 
this week," Editor Black said, 
"come by in persons, because 



Sciences 



enjoying listening to a lecture 
army ROTC life during their 
troduction to campus life. 



on 
in- 



Drilling is more than left, right 



• •• 



ROTC plans float on Red 



Thirty-four cadet members 
of Northwestern State 
University's Reserve Officers 
such topics as parliamentary Training Corps participated in 
procedure, committee work, their annual 5 °- mile float 
decision-making and problem down ^ d ™ ver - ^ tn P 
solving, interracial con- was conducted by the 
siderations, interpersonal Department of Military 



The NSU ROTC cadets 
began the trip from Grand 
Ecore Bridge and terminated 
the excursion Sunday af- 
ternoon at Colfax. 



legal 



Science at Northwestern State 



Captain Robert Bray, 
assistant professor of military 
science and MSG William W. 
Burkett, senior drill instructor 
in the Department of Military 
Science coordinated the Red 



communications, 

responsibilities and student University, 
rights and responsibilities. 

The program is designed to The adventure trip began 
keep students active while Friday and continued through Rlver float Mp 
attending NSU. All of the Sunday afternoon, 
students in the program were 



The cadets rode down the 





new look... new shoes for your way of life. 
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winding Red River in 15-man 
rubber assault boats. They 
then camped along the river 
on Friday and Saturday 
nights. 

"This is the fourth year that 
we have sponsored a float trip 
down the Red River, and this 
adventure training program 
has been an enjoyable ex- 
perience for cadet par- 
ticipants," said Lt. Col, Paul 
R. Reed, chairman of the 
Department of Military 
Science and director of the 
university's ROTC program. 

The Red River float trip is 
the first in a series of ad- 
venture training exercises 
which the Department of 
Military Science at NSU 
sponsors each year. In Oc- 
tober, ROTC cadets from NSU 
will train with members of 
Company A of the 11th Special 
Forces Group from Fort 
Worth, Tex., "In Operation 
Demon IV," and in the spring 
they will canoe down 
Whitewater rivers in 
Arkansas. 



by JESSIE M. NIPP 

An often underrated Varsity 
Sport at NSU is precision drill. 

This sport, requiring 
tremendous concentration, 
coordination, and teamwork, 
is seldom given the 
recognition it so richly 
deserves. A weapon thrown a 
split second too soon or too 
late can result in the team 
losing valuable points in 
competition at the least, or in 
serious injury to a teammate 



most. 

Representing Northwestern 
State University in national 
competition in precision drill 
for the past 19 years, the Black 
Knights have amassed a total 
of 53 trophies from such 
varied activities as NSU 
Homecoming Parades, the 
Natchitoches Christmas 
Festival Parades, Mardi Gras 
Festivities, invitational drill 
meets throughout the nation, 



Volunteers needed 



and the National Cherry 
Blossom Parade and Drill 
Meet in Washington, D. C. In 
the past year they have also 
competed in the Tulane Drill 
Meet where they ranked 
fourth in a field of 17, and the 
University of Illinois In- 
vitational Drill Meet, where 



nation among college drill 
teams, the Knights uphold a 
proud tradition and standard 
of excellence. They sponsor an 
annual summer seminar for 



fo 



play; 
on 



Sea 



by Bi 
Punt, pass 
petition "kic 
tramural sei 
semester of 1 
to 70 studen 
Ws "test" 



By Steven Parson 
Randy Carter, News 
Director of KNWD would like 
to start a news format on the 
air that would be at least three 
to four news broadcasts 
Monday thru Thursday, two 
on Friday, and one on Sun- 
days. 

He is presently looking for 
people, not necessarily 

journalism students, who 
would like to have a chance to 
broadcast, write, and cover 

news stories. Carter said it 
would not take more than two 
days of the week to gather 



news on campus and rewrite 

stories from the Times and 
Journal. 

Persons interested should 
call the studio at the Old Russ- 
ell Library or contact Carter 
at 357-5040 on campus for 
more information. He would 
welcome persons to write 
news editorials on any subject 
to be broadcast. 



Knights are sponsored by CPT 

Robert M. Bray, INF, 

Assistant Professor of 

Military Science, and many of 

their expenses, including 

letter seaters, are paid forbj .pr,,,, 
*u t%_ » « w i * o • Moall skilL 
the Dept. of Military Science, { 

Membership is open to the .„ . 

entire student body. Members 

they placed eighth out of 72 are required to attend prac- ^ m{ 

teams. tice and to maintain wnere 

Currently ranked fifth in the rninimum grade point average ^ 

of 2.0. 

Commanded by C-CPT 
Wayne McCart, a senior 
Aviation Science major from 
Haughton, the Knights expect 
area High School drill teams to bring more honor to NSU 
the annual James A. Noe this semester. 
Invitational Drill Meet, and a The female counterpart of 
national High School drill the Black Knights are the ^ 
team competition, which will Velvet Knights. Chartered .in ZI^^ 
be held this year on Dec. 4. 1972, the Velvet Knights are 
Interested NSU students are rapidly gaining recognition as 
invited to join this group of an outstanding Military 
dedicated men. A common Prescision Drill Team in their 
misconception is that par- own right. The VK are com- 
ticipation in ROTC is a manded by Jan Norman, • 
requirement for membership Home Economics Education 
on the drill teams. While the major from Greenwood. 



ach of the 
punting, pass 
Although 
tts intense I 
titramural 
fcnester, the 
Whout havi 
moments. Se 
Boba 



Mtran 



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DURING THE ENTIRE MONTH OF 
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OR just say THANK YOU. 

WITH 1 DOZEN PREMIUM ROSES FOR 

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SIG TAU PLEDGES-The 1976 Jim Dennis Steve Adams Mark 

pledge class of Sigma Tau Gamma Barton James Webb ?A 

CameraS g?2! ^5t aud £ft , Pon Cla y Guess, Ken Taylor. 

amerata, Ra ndy Walker, Bill Land, Jeff Staples and Emery Toms 



by Bo 

Hochst 
amural 
mged se 
cerning t 
'"gram for rJ 
Huded in thi 
*8titution , 
*istants, nei 
scoring s 

itetler 
the team 
*6it in the 
*<*ive T-shir 
'tober and tl 
'overall scl 
^ division. 

The schedul 
*ots is as 
"tball start 
War regi 
fK- 1 and clc 
* eompetitii 
^e fourth. 

^ the past 





September 14. 1976 CUR KENT SAL'CE Page 5 

Lamar wins 17-6 ; Demons get off to shaky start 

fee year of -the Demons gut Lamar four yard line. Sidney middle, only to have it in- rushing category, gaining 127 ■B|Hi^aBBHi^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ M 

In a ihakv start as thp Thi,rni„n „,„„ ; . , ■ .... ... 




3akdale 
Crowell, 
Ronnie 
def. Not 

nd Marie 
irn coor- 
dent per- 



ule 



■fee year of the Demons got 
to a shaky start as the 
ar Cardinals handed the 
ijnons a 17-6 setback 
jturday night in Beaumont, 
>»as. 

Untimely penalties and a 
■pie of missed field goals 
Lnpered the Demons in their 
wempt to win their season 
Lper against the Cards. 

Iflie Demons, getting first 
Lsession of the ball, failed to 
Lke a first down and had to 
Ut to Lamar. Dennis Pen- 
jrgraft got off a booming 52 
0rd punt, only to have it 
^turned the same distance by 
pgn Cunningham of the 
ordinals. This is where 
penalties began to hamper the 
jjemons. 

jifter some great defensive 
jay by the Demons, Lamar 
jced a fourth and two 
jtuation at the Demon 24. 
dbby Kirchoff appeared to 
f ve the Lamar attempt for a 
t st down stopped short, but 
je Demons were offsides on 
be play. 



- your 



ap. 



r Two plays later, Willie 
vhen y 0u gn^ington threw Cardinal 
ne soon for ajjarterback Chris Frederick 
appointmenjt a loss of seven but a per- 
Lal foul penalty was 
charge for sessed against NSU. This 
■e made for F ^ e ba ^ on tne Demon 13 
e added ^ tne next plav f 0UrK * ^ 
are beini |ony Pendland leaking off 
8-4 dailv w,!f tac ^ e * or tne 13 yards and 
^touchdown for Lamar. 



staff in the 
obby. The 



move the toons appeared to have 



ie yearl 
Arts 



• •• 



In the second quarter, the 



offensive momentum 
as they moved the ball 
mm their own 38 to the 



Lamar four yard line. Sidney 
Thornton was instrumental in 
this drive garnering runs of 
five, nine, two , 12 and 11 
yards. Successive plays from 
the Lamar, four yard line 
couldn't put points on the 
board for NSU, so their first 
field goal attempt would be 
made from 19 yards out. 
Dennis Pendergraft's attempt 
to put three points on the 
board was off to the right. 

The Demons got another big 
chance to put points on the 
scoreboard in the third 
quarter when Tommy Braden 
picked off a Cardinal aerial 
and returned it to the Lamar 
34. Thornton got 20 yards in 
three carries but then the 
Demon punch seemed to fade. 

Lamar's defense rose to the 
occasion, dumping the 
Demons for three straight 
losses. With fourth down and 
14 yards to go, Pendergraft 
tried for another three points 
only this time the kick was off 
to the left. 

A Thornton fumble with nine 
seconds to go in the third 
quarter gave the Cards the 
ball at the Demons 21 yard 
line. Anthony Pendland, the 
workhorse for the Cards all 
evening, was called on again 
and again to take the ball to 
paydirt. His runs of 14, two , 
and then a five yard romp into 
the end zone made the game 
13-0. David Stone kicked the 
PAT for Lamar making it 14-0. 

The Demons switched 
quarterbacks, with Mark 
Rhodes coming in for Stuart 
Wright. On first and 10, 
Rhodes fired a pass over the 



middle, only to have it in- 
tercepted and returned 16 
yards to the Demon 29. 

Lamar managed to get one 
first down, but then the 
Demon defense stiffened. The 
Cardinals couldn't put the ball 
in the end zone, but managed a 
28 yard field goal, making it a 
17-0 ball game. 

Determined not to be left 
scoreless in their season 
opener, the Demon offense 
methodically began its march 
down field. Pass completions 
from Wright to Wyamond 
Waters and Pat Collins were 
the big yardage gainers for 
NSU. 

The longest play of the drive 
was a 37 yard pass play from 
Wright to Collins that placed 
the ball at the Lamar four. 
Sidney Thornton gets the call, 
and on the third down, bangs 
the ball over from the one 
putting the Demons on the 
scoreboard. An attempt for 
two points, a pass from Wright 
to Collins, was broken up in 
the end zone. 

The Demons threatened to 
score again, but a fourth and 
six pass play from the Lamar 
18 bounced off the shoulder 
pads of the intended receiver, 
Wyamond Waters, in the end 
zone, leaving the score Lamar 
17, the Demons 6. 

For the game, Stuart Wright 
completed 11 of 33 passes for 
151 yards and had two in- 
tercepted. Many of Wright's 
passes bounced off the 
shoulder pads of his intended 
receivers. Sidney Thornton 
carried the offense in the 



rushing category, gaining 12 
yards on 28 carries. The 
Demons' total yards rushing 
was 156 yards and their total 
offense gained 307 yards. 

The Lamar quarterback 
Chris Frederick was five of 10 
passes completed for 40 yards 
and had one intercepted. 
Anthony Pendland was the 
Cardinals' workhorse, 
carrying 21 times for 78 yards. 
Louis Falgout had 34 yards on 
eight carries for the Cards. 
The Cards only had 142 yards 
total offense in the game. 

The Demons will try to 
bounce back against the 
Stephen F. Austin Lum- 
berjacks this Saturday night 
in the Harry "Rags" Turpin 
Stadium. It is only ap- 
propriate that the first football 
game played by the Demons in 
Natchitoches since the 1974 
season should be with Stephen 
F. Austin. The Demons will 
try to regain possession of 
Chief Caddo, who has resided 
at Stephen F. Austin since the 
Demons lost him in 1974. 

Kickoff time for the game is 
7:30 p.m. and a pep rally will 
be held at 5:30 p.m. Thursday. 




Season begins with a kick 



by Bill Bossier 
Punt, pass, and kick com- 
petition "kicked off" the in- 
tamural season for the fall 
semester of 1976 with some 65 
in inany students competing in 



ored by CPT 
ray, INF, 
fessor ol 



In men's Greek competition, 
the winning team was from 
Kappa Sigma fraternity with a 
total of 3556 feet. John Breland 



led the Sigs and had the 
to "test" of fundamental highest individual score of the 

afternoon. 

Members from both Greek 
tnd independent 
fganizations compiled their 
taan (women) teams for this 
fent where each member of 
>int average W team would compete in 
sch of the three events- 
minting, passing, and kicking. 
Although the competition 
*U intense for this, the first 
ttramural event of the 
fenester, the day did not pass 
lithout having some lighter 
foments. Several people (no 
Ones, Boba) in the punting 

,„ 'tipetition ended up with a 
Cmghts are| / v 

tionas ^ a score because of 
'"Military accuracy, 
am in their 
C are corn- 
Norman, a 
Education 

wood. 



including 

^^^yteuTkuis: 

jry Science, 
ipen to the 
y. Members 
ittend prac- 
laintain J 



by C-CPT 
a senior 
Tiajor from 
ghts expect 
nor to NSU 



nterpart of 
ts are the 
lar tered . in 



Kappa Alpha came in 
second, with a final score of 
2969 feet. The KA team held 
close to the leaders, but fell 
far behind in the punting 
competition. 

Omega Psi Phi finished 
third in men's Greek action, 
followed closely by Robert E. 
Lee, another team from KA. 

In women's Greek activity, 
the winners were a team from 
Tri-Sigma sorority, followed 
by Sigma Kappa, Zeta Phi 
Beta, and Phi Mu. 



htramurals given a new look 



by Bob Rash 

Hochstetler, the new 
Intramural Director, has 
mged several things 
teeming the intramural 
am for the coming year. 

d in these changes is a 
tution , two graduate 
ts, new sports, and a 
scoring system. 



1 



5 Mai* 
' P.J- 

Taylor 

ms 



tier stated that this 
the team that wins each 
t in the program will 
ph/e T-shirts for each team 
^tober and that an award for 
'overall school champion in 
*h division. 

file schedule for upcoming 
C^ts is as follows: Flag 
Pball starts Sept. 20; Tug 
War registration opens 
1*- 1 and closes Oct. 4, with 
^competition taking place 
'toe fourth. 

1,1 the past, all the rules 



lard 



governing the intramural 
program were just in the air, 
but Hochstetler has written a 
formal constitution that is 
available to anyone. He has 
also formed an advisory 
council that will be chosen by 
the Intramural Managers. 

Among the additions to the 
program is the appointment of 
Charlie Cockfield and Doug 
Foldsby as Graduate 
Assistants. Also new is the 
Punt, Pass, and Kick, the Co- 
ed Volleyball , and Inter-tube 
Basketball. 

The new Intramural Hand- 
book contains everything you 
need or want to know about 
the Intramural Program. You 
can go by the Intramural 
Office Monday through Friday 
from 12:30 to 4:00 p.m. and 
pick up a brochure. 



PEK was the men's in- 
dependent team winner, 
compiling 2923 feet for the 
afternoon. This enabled them 
to finish third in overall 
competition. PEK was 
followed by Couyon 8 and the 
Steelers. The women's in- 
dependent winner was the Hot 
Dogs. 

Flag football is scheduled to 
start on September 13. Other 
intramurals scheduled for the 
fall are tennis, tug-of-war, 
pool, volleyball, paddle-ball, 
rifle shoot, bowling, weightlif- 
ting, cross country run, and 
the basketball free throw. 

Team nets 
four girls 

The NSU women's tennis 
team has signed four ad- 
ditional players to scholar- 
ships for the 1976-77 season. 

Larry Lambert, the coach of 
the women's team, announced 
the signing of the four players 
and also announced that his 
team will play at least two 

matches during the fall 
semester before beginning the 
regular season schedule in the 
spring. 

Vivianne Zahri, a star 
player from Santiago, Chile, 




Pigskin Predictions 



— \ 



I had said last week not to expect fantastic 
results, so at least I was right in that 
predication. We had a couple of ties this week, 
these being the LSU-Nebraska game and the 
SLU-N. Alabama game. Being an avid LSU 
fan, I can't bring myself to counting that tie 
as a loss to the number one rated Huskers, so 
that game will be counted (for those who 





braved to pick LSU to win ) as an LSU win. 

The SLU lions were a heavy favorite over 
N. Alabama and had to come from behind to 
tie; so their game will be counted as an SLU 
loss. 

Our guest panelists for this week are Mr. 
Charles Keenan from the Dept. of Sociology 
and Dr. Richard Brown from the Dept. of 
Social Sciences. I hope this week's predictions 
are better than the one from last week. 






BILL BOSSIER 


BOB RYDER 


KEENAN 




SPORTS EDITOR 






4SU vs. SFA 


NSU 21-10 


NSU 21-7 


NSU 10-7 


LSU vs. ORE. ST. 


LSU 31-13 


LSU 24-14 


LSU 21-14 


TUL vs. OLE MISS 


OLE MISS 17-13 


TUL 14-7 


OLE MISS 14-7 


NLU vs. LAMAR 


NLU 24-14 


NLU 10-3 


LAMAR 7-0 


LA. TECH vs McNEESE 


TECH 21-20 


TECH 17-7 


TECH 10-6 


GRAM, vs TEMPLE 


GRAM 35-14 


GRAM 24-14 


GRAM 27-9 


JSL vs CINCI. 


USL 17-14 


CINCI 13-0 


CINCI 13-0 


NICH. vs JACKSONVILLE ST. 


J'ST. 14-13 


NICH 21-13 


J'ST. 7-0 


ARK. ST. vs IND. ST. 


ARK. ST. 35-10 


ARK ST. 14-0 


ARK ST. 31-21 


OHIO ST. vs PENN ST. 


OHIO ST 20-10 


OHIO ST 21-10 


OHIO ST. 16-7 


BALT. vs CINCI. 


CINCI 24-21 


CINCI 14-10 


CINCI 26-14 


DALLAS vs N. O. 


DALLAS 24-14 


DALLAS 38-16 


DALLAS 21-10 


LA vs MINN 


L. A. 24-17 


MINN 28-10 


MINN. 24-14 


GREEN BAY vs ST. LOUIS 


ST. LOUIS 31-10 


ST. LOUIS 24-7 


ST. LOUIS 31-9 


SAN DIEGO vs TAMPA BAY 


TAMPA BAY 17-13 


TAMPA BAY 10-7 


SAN DIEGO 28-3 


k Last weeks totals 


6-14, 42.86 percent 


6-14, 42.86 percent 


3-14, 21.43 percent 



BROWN 

NSU 14-13 

LSU 21-14 

TUL 14-13 

NLU 14-13 

TECH 21-17 
GRAM 21-20 

CINCI 13-10 

J'ST. 17-9 

ARK. ST. 10-7 
OHIO ST 14-10 

CINCI 21-20 

DALLAS 24-14 

L. A. 21-20 
ST. LOUIS 30-16 

SAN DIEGO 26-14 

6-14, 42.86 percent 



heads the list of signees. The 
other three signed by Lambert 

are Babette Cramer, Ard- 
more, Okla., Peggy Juneau, 
Cottonport, and Fran Wise, 
Minden. 

Zahri, who was recruited by 
NSU tennis coach Johnnie 
Emmons, was part of this 
year's South American 
Women's doubles cham- 
pionship team and captured 
several regional titles during 
her career. She also reached 
the quarterfinals of the 
recently completed Louisiana 



Open championships in 
Shreveport. 

Cramer finished second in 
last year's Oklahoma state 
high school tournament after 
winning the regional and she 
also won several other state 
tournaments during her senior 
year. 

Juneau won first place in 
both the Mansura and Bunkie 
invitational tournaments in 
doubles and in mixed doubles 
competition this season, and 
Wise was part of the Minden 
team that made the quar- 



terfinals of the state high 
school tournament. 

These four will join the 
returning players Jan Daiy, 
Peggi Ates, Janie Wallace and 
Peggy Gilhamto round out the 
NSU women's tennis team. 

Lambert said that the Lady 
Demons would participate in 
the Northeast round-robin 
tournament on Nov. 5-6 with 
teams from Tulane, La. Tech, 
and host Northeast. A tenative 
match was announced with 
La. Tech for Oct. 9 on the NSU 
courts. 



ALL MOTORCYCLE RIDERS AND 
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Page 6 CURRENT SAUCE September 14, 1976 



Student Government Association announces 
changes in constitution/ Elections Oct. 5 



PREAMBLE 

We, the Students of Nor- 
thwestern State University of 
Louisiana, grateful for the 
opportunity of living in a free 
country, desiring to benefit 
from our inherent right of self- 
government, and seeking to 
maintain and improve our 
general welfare in this 
educational environment, do 
hereby adopt and establish 
this Constitution. 

NAME 

The name of this organization 
shall be the Student Govern- 
ment Association of Nor- 
thwestern State University of 
Louisiana. 

AUTHORITY AND 
RESPONSIBILITY 

The authority vested in 
Student Government by this 
Constitution shall not be 
altered or retracted except 
through procedures 
specifically enumerated in 
thi3 Constitution. Only those 
powers defined in the Con- 
stitution shall be the 
responsibility of the Student 
Government. 

MEMBERSHIP 

Membership in this 
organization shall include the 
executive, legislative, and 
judicial officers of the student 
body. 

ARTICLE I — 
LEGISLATIVE BRANCH 

SECTION I: CI. I. All 
legislative powers of the 
Northwestern State 
University Student Govern- 
ment Association shall be 
vested in a unicameral 
Student Senate. 
SECTION 2: CI. I. Members 
shall be elected for one year 
terms, elections to be held 
twice each year. The Student 
Senate shall consist of twenty 
(20) elected members. All 
former Student Body 
Presidents shall serve as ex- 
off icio members of the Senate. 

CI. 2. Two Senators shall be 
elected from each un- 
dergraduate class: two Fresh- 
men, two Sophomores, two 
Juniors, two Seniors, and one 
senator from the Graduate 
School, elected by members of 
their respective classes. 

CI. 3. Eleven (11) Senators 
shall be elected by the 
members of the Student Body 
at-large. 

CI. 4. The Vice President of 
the SGA shall appoint two 
voting members from the 
Senate to serve on the Student 
Union Governing Board as 
provided for in the Student 
Union Constitution. 

CI. 5. The Student Senate 
has the right to appoint 
student associates to perform 
clerical tasks for the Senate 
members. 

SECTION 3: CI. 1. The Student 
Senate shall have the sole 
right of impeachment and 
removal. No Student 
Government Association 
Executive officer may be 
removed from his office ex- 
cept through impeachment 
and removal proceedings in 
the Student Senate. When 
sitting for that purpose, they 
shall be on oath or af- 
firmation. The Chief Justice of 
the Student Supreme Court 
shall preside. No person shall 
be convicted without the 
concurrence of two-thirds of 
the members present. 
SECTION 4: CI. 1. The Student 
Senate shall be the judge of all 
election returns from elec- 
tions conducted by the 
Commissioner of Elections 
and of the qualifications of 
candidates for those offices, 
acting upon recommendations 
of the Elections Board. 

CI. 2. Two-thirds shall 
constitute a quorum to do 
business. 

CI. 3. The Senate is 
authorized to compel the 
attendance of members in 
sttch a manner and under such 
penalties as provided for in 
the Rules of the Senate. 



SECTION 5: CI. 1. The Student 
Senate shall make university 
wide student rules and 
regulations, appropriate all 
revenues of Student Govern- 
ment, confirm or deny by 
majority such nominations as 
the Student Body President 
shall from time to time be 
called upon to make, to keep 
informed concerning the 
attitude of the Student Body 
with regard to all problems of 
student interest; provide for 
the general welfare of the 
student body, and make 
recommendations to the 
Student President, to consider 
and take a action upon all 
matters referred to it by the 
University Administration. 
SECTION 6: Q. 1. No Student 
Senator shall serve simultane- 
ously in any executive or 
judicial office of the Student 
Government Association of 
Northwestern State 
University. 

SECTION 7: CI. 1. Every bill 
which shall have passed the 
Student Senate shall, before it 
be enacted, be presented to 
the Student Body President. If 
he approves he shall sign it, 
but if not he shall return it 
with his objections to the 
Student Senate for recon- 
sideration. If after such 
reconsideration two-thirds of 
the Senate present and voting 
shall agree to pass the bill, it 
shall be passed. If any bill 
shall not be returned by the 
Student Body President within 
seven days after it shall have 
been presented to him, the 
same shall be enacted in like 
manner as if he had signed it. 

CI. 2. Having been enacted 
by the Northwestern State 
University Student Govern- 
ment Association, all acts 
except those specifically 
dealing with the internal 
operation of the Student 
Government Association shall 
be presented to the President 
of the University; if he ap- 
proves he shall sign it, but if 
not he shall return it with his 
objections to the Student 
Senate whereupon the Senate 
shall reserve the right to 
submit the bill to the 
Louisiana State Board of 
Trustees for their approval or 
disapproval. If any bill shall 
not be returned by the 
President of the University 
within ten working days after 
it shall have been passed and 
presented to him, the same 
shall be enacted in like 
manner as if he had signed it. 
ARTICLE II — 
EXECUTIVE BRANCH 
SECTION 1: CI. 1. The 
executive power of the Nor- 
thwestern State University 
Student Government 
Association shall be vested in 
the Executive Council, which 
is composed of a Student 
President, Student Vice 
President, Executive 
Secretary, Executive 
Treasurer, and a Com- 
missioner of Elections. Each 
shall hold office during the 
term of one year. The 
Presidents of The Association 
of Men Students (AMS), and 
The Association of Women 
Students (AWS) shall serve as 
ex-officio members of the 
Executive Council. 
SECTION 2: CI. 1. A Student 
Body President shall be 
popularly elected by majority 
vote of ballots cast by 
members of the Student Body, 
in an election held for that 
purpose. The Student 
President shall at the time of 
his election and for the term 
be a member of the NSU 
Student Body for at least one 
year. He shall have completed 
at least forty-five (45) 
semester hours; he shall have 
served on the Student 
Government Association in an 
elective office for a full 
semester. 

SECTION 3 : CI. 1. If the office 
of Student Body President 



CI. 4. The Student Senate should become vacant 

may determine the rules of its because of absence or tem- 

proceedings (Rules of the porary disability, the Vice 

Senate) and with the con- President shall act as 

eurrenceof two-thirds of those President. If the office of 

present, expel a member as Student Body President 

provided by the rules. should become vacant 



because of resignation, 
removal, or permanent 
disability, the Vice President 
shall become Student Body 
President. The Chairman of 
the Senate shall succeed the 
Student Body Vice President 
in line of succession. 

CI. 2. Should a vacancy in an 
executive office arise, a 
special election shall be held 
within three weeks of the 
accepted resignation unless 
that office is to be terminated 
within 60 days, in such case 
the office shall be filled by 
appointment. In the meantime 
the president may appoint a 
temporary replacement. 
SECTION 4: CI. 1. The Student 
Body President shall have the 
power, by and with the advice 
and consent of the Student 
Senate, to nominate and ap- 
point all officers and members 
of the Student Government 
Association not otherwise 
provided for herein. 

CI. 2. He shall have the 
power to fill all vacancies in 
the Senate with the approval 
of a majority of the Senate. 

CI. 3. He shall have the 
power to call special meetings 
of the Student Senate when he 
deems such meetings 
necessary, or when requested 
to do so by a majority of the 
total membership of the 
Student Senate or when 
petitioned to do so by a 
minimum of 10 percent of the 
members of the Student Body. 

CI. 4. The Student President 
shall have the power to select 
the student members of all 
boards and committees and 
appoint the chairmen of each, 
with the approval of the 
Student Senate, where such 
chairmen or members are not 
otherwise provided for in this 
Constitution. He shall also 
have the power to remove t- 
hose committee officers and 
members with majority ap- 
proval of the Senate. 

CI. 5. He shall represent the 
Student Body on all official 
occasions and coordinate 
student activities and ser- 
vices. He may address the 
Student Senate, recommend 
for their consideration such 
measures as he shall deem 
necessary and expedient; he 
may convene the Student 
Senate in extraordinary 
session and take care of all 
acts of the Student Senate; he 
is responsible for faithfully 
executing the acts that are 
passed. 

SECTION 5: CI. 1. A Student 
Vice President shall be 
popularly elected by the 
Student Body to serve for a 
term of one year, as provided 
for by this Constitution. He 
shall have completed at least 
45 semester hours of academic 
work, and have served on the 
Student Government 
Association in an elective 
office, for at least one 
semester at the time of filing. 

CI. 2. The Student Vice 
President shall succeed the 
Student President as provided 
for in Section 3. He shall serve 
as chairman of the Student 
Services Committee, and he 
shall coordinate all com- 
mittees. 

CI. 3. He shall serve as 
presiding officer of the Senate. 
SECTION 6: CI. 1. A Com- 
missioner of Elections shall be 
elected by the members of the 
Student Body to serve for a 
term of one year, as provided 
for by this Constitution. He 
shall have completed at least 
45 semester hours of academic 
work. 

CI. 2. He shall serve as 
chairman of the Elections 
Board which shall supervise 
all elections conducted by the 
SGA. 

CI. 3. The Commissioner 
shall appoint the member of 
the Elections Board subject to 
approval of the Senate. 
SECTION 7: CI. 1. An 
Executive Secretary shall be 
popularly elected by the 
Student Body to serve a term 
of one year. 

CI. 2. The Executive 
Secretary shall be responsible 
for all official correspondence 
and records and shall serve as 



Secretary of the School Spirit 
Committee, and will serve as 
the Senate Clerk. 

CI. 3. The Executive 
Secretary shall faithfully 
execute all acts and measures 
delegated to her by the 
Executive Council. 
SECTION 8: CI. 1. An 
Executive Treasurer shall be 
popularly elected by the 
Student Body to serve a term 
of one year. He shall have 
completed the first basic 
accounting course with a 
grade of C or better. 

CI. 2. It shall be the 
responsibility of the Executive 
Treasurer to secure from the 
Business Office of the 
University within one month 
after the beginning of the 
semester a statement of the 
funds available for use by the 
Student Government Assoc- 
iation, to pay out money ap- 
propriated by the Student 
Senate and sign all approved 
requisitions, to transmit 
authorization for expenditures 
authorized by the Student 
Senate, to make a report of the 
Association's financial status 
once each month at the first 
meeting of the Student Senate 
of that month, to provide same 
for publication in the 
CURRENT SAUCE, to pur- 
chase all awards and supplies 
upon being properly 
requisitioned for same, and 
serve as chairman of the 
Budget Committee. Failure to 
perform said duties shall be 
considered malfeasance in 
office. 

SECTION 9: CI. 1. The Student 
Senate shall create such 
organs as shall be necessary 
and proper for the im- 
plementation of the duties and 
powers of the Executive 
Council. 

SECTION 10: CI. 1. The 
President of the Student 
Government Association shall 
receive a full-time scholarship 
(a full-time scholarship 
provides a stipend equivalent 
to the total cost of the in- 
firmary fee, dining hall meal 
ticket, rental of any dormitory 
room, registration fee and 
other fees charged at 
registration). The Vice 
President, Commissioner of 
Elections, Secretary and 
Treasurer of the Association 
shall each receive a half-time 
scholarship (a half-time 
scholarship provides a stipend 
equivalent to one-half that of 
the scholarship of the Student 
Body President. 

CI. 2. The scholarships for 
the President, Vice President, 
Commissioner of Elections, 
Secretary, and Treasurer of 
the Association shall be paid 
out of the General Student 
Body funds. The scholarships 
of the CURRENT SAUCE 
staff members shall be paid 
from the funds of the 
CURRENT SAUCE Agency; 
and the scholarships of the 
POTPOURRI staff shall be 
paid from the funds of the 
POTPOURRI agency. These 
scholarships shall be paid at 
such times and in such 
manner as are the other 
rtudent employment positions 
sf the University. 

CI. 3. The stipend paid all 
office holders may not be 
changed by vote during the 
one year tenure of each office 
holder. 

SECTION 11: CI. 1. No 
;xecutive officer shall 
simultaneously hold office in 
the Student Senate, Student 
Supreme Court, Student Union 
Governing Board, Associated 
Men Students or Associated 
Women Students Executive 
Committees. 

ARTICLE IN- 
JUDICIAL BRANCH 
SECTION 1: Q. 1. All judicial 
powers of the Student 
Government Association shall 
be vested in one Student 
Supreme Court and inferior 
courts of the Associated 
Women Students and 
Associated Men Students, or 
other courts established by the 
Student Senate from time to 
time. 

SECTION 2: CI. 1. The 
justices, both of the Supreme 



and inferior courts, shall be 
regularly enrolled students at 
the time of their appointment 
and confirmation. Members of 
the Student Supreme Court 
shall serve one year or until 
they resign or cease to be 
regularly enrolled students at 
Northwestern State 
University or shall be im- 
peached and convicted for 
cause upon a two-thirds vote 
of the Student Senate. 
SECTION 3: CI. 1. The Student 
Supreme Court shall consist of 
seven (7) members. 
SECTION 4: CI. 1. The Student 
Body President shall fill all 
vacancies on the Student 
Supreme Court as they occur, 
with the approval of the 
Student Senate. One justice 
shall be appointed by the 
President as the Chief Justice. 
SECTION 5: CI. 1. The judicial 
power of the Student Supreme 
Court shall extend to all cases 
arising under the Constitution 
and the acts of the Student 
Senate. 

CI. 2. The Court shall have 
original jurisdiction in all 
cases involving controversies 
between organizations and 
students, organizations and 
other organizations, students 
and faculty, students and 
administration, and all cases 
to which Student Government 
shall be a party, if not 
otherwise provided for in the 
Constitution or Code of Con- 
duct. 

CI. 3. It shall be the highest 
appellate court in the student 
judicial system and may call 
cases before it on its own 
initiative. 

CI. 4. This Court shall hear 
appeals from the Judicial 
Boards of AWS and AMS. 
SECTION 6: CI. 1. No court 
may render an opinion, hear 
evidence, nor pass judgment 
in the absence of a quorum. 
Quorum for the Student 
Supreme Court shall be 5 
members. 

SECTION 7 : CI. 1. The Student 
Supreme Court shall follow 
procedures prescribed in the 
Student Supreme Court 
Procedures and the NSU Code 
of Conduct. 

ARTICLE IV 
SECTION 1: CI. 1. Upon 
petition by ten percent (10 
percent) of the Student Body, 
the Student President shall 
call and preside over a 
general meeting of the Nor- 
thwestern State University 
Student Government 
Association. 

SECTION 2: CI. 1. The 
members of the Student Body 
may recall any elected 
representative if the petition 
providing for a recall election 
shall be signed by the number 
of members of the Student 
Body in the affected officers 
constituence equal to five (5) 
percent and provided that the 

question "Shall 

be retained as a 

- officer of the SGA," shall 
receive a two-thirds (2 3) 
majority of the nay votes cast. 

SECTION 3: CI. 1. Any bill 
being considered for passage 
by the Student Senate may, by 
a majority vote of the Senate, 
be referred to the members of 
the Student Body for their 
approval. In such case the 
Student Senate shall provide 
for the publication of such bill 
in CURRENT SAUCE three 
consecutive issues prior to 
such election. For such bill to 
be enacted it must receive a 
two-thirds majority of the 
votes cast. Balloting on such 
bill shall take place at such 
time and in such manner as 
provided by the Student 
Senate, and the results of such 
an election shall be binding 
upon the Student Senate. 
ARTICLE V — 
ELECTIONS 
SECTION 1: CI. 1. Every 
officer of the SGA shall have, 
at the time of filing for office, 
and at the time of 
inauguration an over-all "C" 
average as certified by the 
Registrar. Any SGA officer or 
appointee, including 
cheerleaders, judges and 
editors and staff members of 



publications, shall be 
automatically disqualified 
from holding office at the end 
of any semester in which his 
over-all scholastic average 
falls below this niinimum 
requirement. 

CI. 2. All candidates for 
election to the Student Senate 
or the Executive Council of the 
Student Government must be 
eligible to serve two full 
semesters. 

CI. 3. Term of office is one 
year, except as otherwise 
provided for herein. 
SECTION 2: Q. 1. No student 
may run for any office of the 
SGA while on disciplinary or 
academic probation and no 
student may be appointed to 
any such office while on 
disciplinary or academic 
probation. 

CI. 2. Once in office, 
however, no officeholder may 
be removed from that office 
for any reasons, except as 
otherwise provided for herein, 
except through impeachment 
proceedings by the Student 
Senate as provided for in this 
Constitution. 

SECTION 3: CI. 1. A student 
desiring to be a candidate for 
any of the various Association 
offices shall file a written 
"Notice of Intention" with the 
Office of the Vice President of 
Student Affairs prior to a 
deadline set by the Elections 
Board for each election. 

CI. 2. The "Notice of In- 
tention" shall consist of the a- 
pplicant's name, 
classification, scholastic 
average as certified by the 
Registrar, and name of office 
for which he intends to seek 
election. 

CI. 3. Candidates will be 
certified as to their eligibility 
by the Elections Board within 
one week after filing. 

CI. 4. The names of those 
candidates which the Elec- 
tions Board certifies to be 
eligible for candidacy for the 
office they seek shall be 
published in every issue of the 
Current Sauce from the time 
of certification until the time 
of the election. 
SECTION 4: CI. 1. A general 
SGA election for Executive 
Council and eleven (11) 
Senators-at-large shall be held 
no later than the fifteenth 
week (counting registration 
week as the first week) of the 
spring semester. 

CL 2. Class Senators shall be 
elected in a special election 
presided over by the Election 
Board no later than the fifth 
week of the fall semester 
(counting registration as the 
first week.) 

CI. 3. All elections, including 
voting on proposed con- 
stitutional amendments, shall 
be held in the Student Union 
and any other locations set up 
by the Student Senate Voting 
machines shall be used, if 
available; if voting machines 
are unavailable, locked ballot 
boxes shall be used. Polls shall 
remain open from 8 a. m. to 7 
p. m. on the day of election. 
Commissioners shall be 
named by the Elections 
Board; no commissioner may 
work at the polls if he is a 
candidate for any office to be 
elected in that election. 
Methods and procedures in 
runoff elections must be 
uniform with the general 
election for that office. Poll 
watchers may be appointed by 
the candidates. 

CI. 4. In elections for 
Executive Officers of the 
Association or other officer in 
which only one post is vacant, 
and one candidate fails to 
secure a majority of votes in 
the general election, a run-off 
shall be held one week later. 
In the run-off election, the two 
candidates having received 
the largest number of votes 
for each specified office shall 
compete for that office, and a 
simple majority shall elect. 

CI. 5. All candidates for 
Class Senators or Senator at 
large receiving a majority of 
votes cast shall assume office 
after the first balloting. A run- 
off election shall be held no 
later than one week after the 



initial balloting. The top 
number of candidates equal to 
not more than twice the 
number of seats vacant after 
the first balloting shall qualify 
for the run-off election. In the 
run-off election the seats 
vacant shall be filled by those 
candidates receiving the 
highest number of votes. 

CI. 6. Any protest shall be 
heard by the Student Supreme 



Fund $15.00; Union 
Drama fee $1.00; Stud en , 
Government Activity {. 
$2.75; Alumni Dues $.5q. 
(should both husband and ^ 
of a family be members of ^ 
Association, only one would be 
required to pay that portion of 
the fees allocated to t«, 
POTPOURRI); KNWD 
$.50 and Artist Series $.75, 
Cl. 2. The general Student SE CTI0N 



( Continued 

AR 

-AMI 
0CTION 
pendmenl 
jjtutionma 
^hirds v 
^bership 
the pr< 



pate or a 
ped by 1 
JA and 1 
jenate. The 
,iitain a sb 
£ect date 



Court if presented in writing to Body Association fee shall be ^ oposed 31 

$29.75 for the spring semester W 0Stitutio ' 



ities of 
,UCE pric 
m by the 
ion to 



allocated as follows- 
CURRENT SAUCE J2.00- 
Student drama activities $.75! 
Student Government 8 c. 
tivities $2.75; Alumni dues 
$.50; Student Union program Etion sha 
$6.50; Recreation Facility^ folio 
Fund $15.00; Union Board 
Drama Fee $1.00; KNWD f ee Ration 
$.50; and Artist Series fee $.75. Jf^ set , 

Senate. ] 
unendment 



the Commissioner of Elections 
within forty-eight (48) hours 
after the announcement of the 
winners. The determination of 
a majority in all elections 
shall be defined according to 
Louisiana Law. 
SECTION 5: CI. 1. The 
inaugural ceremony shall be 
held during each semester in 
which the Association officers 
are elected. The retiring 
Executive Council and of- 
ficers of the Student Senate 
shall constitute a committee 
for carrying out the inaugural 
ceremonies properly. The 
retiring President of the 
Association, or his 
representative, shall preside 
at the inauguration, and the 
President of the University or 
his representative shall ad- 
minister the oath of office. 

CL 2. The Oath of Office 
shall be worded as follows: "I, 

do 

solemnly swear (or affirm) 
that I will faithfully execute 
the office to which I have been 
elected and that I will do my 
best to fulfill the duties of my 
office and uphold the Con- 
stitution of the Student 
Government Association of 
Northwestern State 
University of Louisiana." 
SECTION 6: Q. 1. Each of- 
ficer shall assume the 
responsibilities of his office 
immediately upon being 
inaugurated. 

CI. 2. At least one meeting of 
the newly elected Student 
Senate shall be held during the 
period remaining in the spring 
semester after the 
inauguration. The retiring 
President, Secretary, and 
Treasurer of the Executive 
Council, and the retiring of- 
ficers of the Senate shall be 
present at this meeting. At 
this meeting, all standing 
committees shall be appointed 

and a faculty adviser for the with recommendations of the 
SGA shall be appointed by the various proposed budgets 
Senate, subject to the ap- from organizations receiving 
proval of the President of the student fees. The Student 
University. Senate shall meet for 

CI. 3. Those officers elected budgetary reasons to review, 
in the fall semester shall be 



shed in 



AR 

— PU 

SECTION 1: 
jewspaper 
Issociation 
CURRENT 



CI. 3. The SGA fee shall be 
$14.00 for the summer session 
allocated as follows: IT^rityof 
CURRENT SAUCE $l. 00; *' 
Student Drama activities $.25 
Student Government Ac- 
tivities $1.50; Alumni Dues 
$.25; Student Union Program 
$3.25; Recreation Facility 
Fund $6.00; Union Board 
Drama Fee $.50; KNWD f ee 
$.50; and Artist Series $.75. 

lepresenta 

CI. 4. Of the Student WJRRENT 
Government activity fee, $1.50 Lend a n 
shall be allocated for the ineetings, a 
operation of the Student ^ meetin 
Government; $.25 for a fthe CUR] 
reserve unit; and $1.00 for a 
SGA speaker program. Of the 
Student Union program fee, 
$1.00 shall be used for 
professional drama 
programming under the Fine 
Arts Committee, and $12.00 for 
research and development. 

CI. 5. All full-time students 
including graduate students 
as defined by the NSU 
catalogue shall pay all fees 
designated in this article. All 
full-time graduate students as 
defined by the Dean of the 
Graduate School shall also 
pay the fees enumerated in 
this Article. CI. 3. T 

SECTION 2: CI. 1. All faff will 1 
supervisory financial control jtan five i 
of the SGA revenues and tips, 
expenditures shall be vested 
in the Student Senate of the 
SGA. 



SECTION 2: 
he CURRE 
It determin 
ing of ea 
tajuency 
plication 
approval 1 
Publications 



Q. 2. Scl 
on the CUR 
not excee< 
scholarship! 
and Busine 



CI. 2. The Student Senate 



0. 4. The 
located frc 
Judication 



inaugurated at the first 
meeting of the Student Senate 
after completion of their 
election. 

ARTICLE VI — 
COMMITTEES 
AND BOARDS 
SECTION 1: CL 1. The 
Standing Committees and 



approve or reject budgets 
from all organizations 
receiving SGA fees not later 
than the seventh week of each 
semester. All said 
organizations must submit 
budgets. 

CI. 3. Expenditures and 
purchases paid out of the 
General Student Body fees 



Board established under this shall be made through the 
constitution shall be the University using normal state 
following: Community regulations unless otherwise 
Relations Committee, Student authorized by the Student 
Loan Committee, Senate. 
Organizations Board, Campus SECTION 3: CI. 1- Ex- 
Security Relations and Traffic penditures and purchases paid 
Committee, School Spirit out of Student Government 



Committee, Cheerleader 
Governing Board, Student 
Broadcasting, Student Ser- 
vices Committee, Student 
Rights Committee, General 
University Coordinating 



shall review, accept or reject *pose of s 

I* determii 
% of eacl 

Student Fir 
ipon reco 
twdgets of 
«nd cannot 1 
toy one st 
ets ha\ 

Action 3: 

Publications 
"Miiinatean 
*e CURRE] 
to of qua: 
the i 
^dent Sen 

CI. 2. To I 
^torship c 
J^CE, the 
comp] 
fester he 
*8st three 1 

^ three ho 
! t 'easta2.( 
must ha 
^RENT 
semesl 



funds shall be made through 
the normal purchasing 
procedures. 

CI. 2. Other expenditures not 
expressly provided in this 
Constitution shall be made 



Committee, and Committee on only with the majority of those 
Committees. 
CI. 2. The Senate shall adapt 



senators present. 

CI. 3. Travel expenses 
students representing Stu< 



Government, if such trips 



authorized by the Student 
Senate, shall be paid if 
proved in advance. Receipt 
must be submitted for all sue" 



guidelines for the organization 
and general composition of all 
committees except as other- 
wise provided herein. 

CI. 3. The committee on 
committees shall comply with 
the guidelines established by ex^ndTtu7e"s.' 
tne Senate for committees. A RT I C L E V 

CI. 4. The guidelines on 
committees shall be con- 
solidated into Senate Rules. 

ARTICLE VII 

-FINANCES 
SECTION 1: Q. 1. The general 
Student Body Association fee 
shall be $39.75 for the fall 
semester, allocated as 
follows: POTPOURRI $10.00- 
CURRENT SAUCE $2.00;' 
Student Drama activities $.75 \ 
Student Union program fees 
$6-50; Recreation Facility 



are 



den' 
nd 



the 



II 

— LOAN FUND 

SECTION 1: CI. l.ThestU' 
Senate shall set up rules * 
regulations governing 
Student Loan Fund; and * 
fund shall be administered W 
the Student Loan ComM^' 
composed of three facuW 
members named by 1 
President of the Universe 
and three student mefllb jL 
named by the President of f 
SGA. 



"•ection. 

3 - H n< 
^ee of Et 
ts the < 
lent Pu 
'"tee may 
^ied ca 
foval 1 



M Cane 
>nthe 

!, ef °f ' 
^CE sha] 

J^tion" v 

t Presi* 
Vs, con 

ll he pro 
>ger an 

>rtants1 

jNuttee 

^therorr 

Qualified 



(Continued on Page 7 > 



■ * 



September 14. 1976 CTRKKNT SAUCE Page 7 



Constitution revision 



■Continued from Page 6) 

ARTICLE IX 
— AMENDMENTS 

gCTION 1: CI. 1. An 
,endment to this Con- 
jtution may be proposed by a 
U4hirds vote of the entire 
SI 00- <it^ Lnbership of the Senate or 
Activity Jf ] presentation to the 
li Dues t sn*F 

usbandand w : r te ° F * Pr0P ° 

members by ri 10 "Tl f * 

,,„„„„ , a *fcA and presented to the 
uy one would k.p" ^ j_ * 

„ fW „ .. °« aiate. The amendment must 

v tnat portion 

^ ot „. , 'obtain a statement as to the 
ocated to vtJr . 

I); KNWD f^F** ltS P rovlslons - 

t Series $.75 

general St U( wP CTI0N 2: CL L Anv 

ion fee snail? r P ° Sed amendment of °» 

pring semesta. »" stitution must be 
■ ^lished in three consecutive 



as follows 
SAUCE 12.00! 
i activities I.75! 
vernment ac [ 
Alumni du« 



: Series fee t.75. 
j A fee shall be 



piies of the CURRENT 
UUCE prior to being voted 
jion by the association. The 
Section to amend the Con- 



Union progranjUrtfon sha ll be held within a 
ation Facili ty ^ k following the third 
Union ' 

'^^^f^k ^cation and the election 
be set up by the Student 
legate. Ratification of 
lununw F sess »onLendments shall be simple 

i activities $.25- 
rernment Ac- 
Alumni Dues 
Jnion Program 
ation Facility 
Union Board 
50; KNWD f ee 
st Series $.75. 



position to which he is ap- 
pointed. 

SECTION 4: CI. 1. In 
cooperation with the staff of 
the newspaper, the Editor-in- 
Chief shall direct the policies 
of his particular publication; 
he shall be directly respon- 
sible for its publication and its 
contents. 

CI. 2. The Editor shall be 
responsible also for main- 
taining a publication of the 
best possible quality and shall 
seek to protect the integrity of 
the University and the SGA 
while providing an adequate 
medium for the dissemination 
of student views. 

CI. 3. The Editor-in-Chief 
shall receive a full-time schol- 
arship as defined in this 
Constitution. 



ARTICLE X 
— PUBLICATION 

ECTION 1: Q. 1. The official 
Lewspaper of the Student 
Association shall be the 
CURRENT SAUCE. A 



the Student 
:tivity fee, 11.50 



representative from the 
CURRENT SAUCE shall 
attend all Student Senate 
cated for the laeetings, and the minutes of 
the Student 



$.25 for a 
md $1.00 for a 
rogram. Of the 

program fee, 
be used for 

al drama 
inder the Fine 



each meeting shall be printed 
in the CURRENT SAUCE. 



SECTION 2: CI. 1. The staff of 

ie CURRENT SAUCE shall 

k determined at the begin- 

ing of each semester the 

lequency of publication and 
, and $12.00 for . Ucation dflte> ^ ^ 

development. ■ gl of the student 
-time students Mcations Committee, 
luate students 
>y the NSU 
1 pay all fees 
lis article. All 
ite students as 

Dean of tiw 
>ol shall also 
■numerated in 

Q. 3. The POTPOURRI 
CI. 1. All Ifoff will receive not more 
iancial control tan five full-time scholar- 
revenues and ftps, 
lall be vested I 

Senate of the rj 4 ^ amount ^ mon ey 
located from the respective 
tudent Senate Plication agencies for the 
:cept or reject *T»se of scholarships shall 



Q. 2. Scholarship positions 
on the CURRENT SAUCE will 
ant exceed five full-time 
scholarships, including Editor 
and Business Manager. 



dations of the 
sed budgets 
ons receiving 



* determined at the begin- 
% of each semester by the 



The Student l^ent Finance Commission 



meet for 
>ns to review, 
iject budgets 
irganizations 
fees not later 
1 week of each 
All said 
nust submit 



nditures and 
out of the 
t Body fees 



normal state 
ss otherwise 
the Student 

CI. 1. Ex- 
lurchases paid 

Government 
made through 
purchasing 

xmdituresnot 
ided in this 
all be made 
jority of those 

4 



jpon recommendation in 
Ngets of the publications 
tod cannot be changed during 
toy one semester after the 
todgets have been approved. 



ACTION 3: a. l. The Student 
Plications Committee shall 
*minate an Editor-in-Chief of 
*e CURRENT SAUCE from a 
^ of qualified candidates, 
the approval of the 
through the ^ent Senate. 



C- 2. To be eligible for the 
%rship of the CURRENT 
JAUCE, the candidate must 
'* completed at least 45 
tester hours, including at 
**rt three hours of reporting 

^ three hours of editing with 
^ least a 2.0 over-all average. 

must have served on the 
'URRENT SAUCE at least 



^lecti 



E VIII 
FUND 
1. The stude"' 
up rules ana 
iverning m 

und; and* 
ministered w 
n Committe 6 ' 
tiree facuW 
.ed by I 
,e Universe 
:nt member 
esident of 



semester prior to his 



SECTION 5: CI. 1. The 
Business Manager shall be a 
member of the Student Body. 
He shall have completed at 
least 45 semester hours, in- 
cluding some courses in ac- 
counting, and he must 
maintain at least a 2.0 average 
over all. 

CI. 2. He shall be responsible 
for the business aspects of the 
publication. He shall also file a 
proposed budget with the 
Student Finance Commission 
at the first of each semester. 

SECTION 6: CI. 1. The 
President of the University 
shall recommend each year, 
with the approval of the 
Student Publications Com- 
mittee, a member of the 
faculty to serve as advisor to 
the CURRENT SAUCE. He 
shall work closely with the 
various editors and shall give 
them advice and assistance in 
the production of the 
CURRENT SAUCE. 

SECTION 7: CI. 1. The 
CURRENT SAUCE is to be 
free of censorship. The editor 
or other staff members shall 
not be arbitrarily suspended 
because of student, facility, 
administration, alumni, or 
community disapproval of 
editorial policy or content. 
The staff, however, shall 
conform to the editorial 
guidance of the Student 
Publications Committee. 

CI. 2. An editor or staff 
member may be removed 
from his office only by the 
Student Publications Com- 
mittee with the approval of the 
Student Senate. 

SECTION 8: CI. 1. The official 
year book of the SGA of NSU 
shall be the POTPOURRI. 

SECTION 9: CI. 1. The Student 
Publications Committee shall 
appoint an Editor-in-Chief of 
the POTPOURRI from a list of 
qualified candidates with the 
approval of the Student 
Senate. 

CI. 2. To be eligible for the 
editorship of the POT- 
POURRI, a candidate must 
have completed at least 45 
semester hours including 
some hours in magazine 
editing with at least a 2.0 over 
all average. He must have 
served on the POTPOURRI 
staff at least one semester 
prior to his appointment. 

CI. 3. If no one files for the 
office of Editor-in-Chief who 



meets the above 
qualifications, the Student 
Publications Committee may 
select the best qualified 
candidate with the approval of 
the Student Senate. 

CI. 4. Candidates aspiring to 
obtain the office of Editor-in- 
Chief of the POTPOURRI 
shall file a "notice of in- 
tention" with the chairman of 
the Student Publications 
Committee, containing the 
names of the more important 
staff members. The Com- 
mittee shall determine 
whether or not each candidate 
is qualified to serve in the 
position to which he is ap- 
pointed. 

' Q. 5. The Editor-in-Chief of 
the POTPOURRI shall file a 
"notice of intention" with the 
chairman of the Student 
Publications Committee, 
containing the names of the 
more important staff mem- 
bers. The Committee shall 
determine whether or not each 
candidate is qualified to serve 
in the position to which he is 
appointed. 

CI. 5. The editor shall be 
responsible for filing a 
proposed budget with the 
Student Finance Commission 
at the first of each semester. 

SECTION 10: CI. 1. The 
President of the University 
shall recommend each year, 
with the approval of the 
Student Publications Com- 
mittee, a member of the 
faculty to serve as advisor to 
the POTPOURRI. 

ARTICLE XI — 
STUDENT BILL 
OF RIGHTS 

SECTION 1: The student has 
the right to petition the 
government for redress of 
grievance. 

SECTION 2. The student has 
the right to judicial due 
process, including a speedy 
trial, confrontation of the 
plaintiff or his witness, 
council, presumption of in- 
nocence, protection against 
cruel punishment, and appeal 
as defined in the NSU Code of 
Conduct. 

SECTION 3. The student has 
the right to bring suit within 
the regular judiciary struction 
for any violation of right 
guaranteed by the Student Bill 
of Rights or Student 
Regulations. 

SECTION 4. The student has 
the right not to be twice put in 
jeopardy for the same offense. 

SECTION 5. The student has 
the right to invite and hear 
any person of his choice on 
any subject of his choice as 
provided for in the original 
Handbook. 

SECTION 6. The student has 
the right to use campus 
facilities, subject to uniform 
regulations governing the 
facility. 

SECTION 7. The student has 
the right of assembly to 
demonstrate, inform, or 
protest, so long as the normal 
workings of the NSU Student 
Association are not disrupted. 

SECTION 8. The student has 
the right to be secure in his 
possessions against invasion 
of privacy, and unreasonable 
search and seizure. 



on. 



penses » 3 - H no one files for the 

siting Student Jce of Editor-in-Chief who 

such trips & ^ the qualifications, the 

the Student ^dent Publications Com- 

e paid if W J*** select ^ 

nee Receipt 5 J^Ufied candidate, with the 

ed for all sue* Jfoval of the Student 



*ate. 

1 Candidates aspiring to 
v 8 ^ the office of Editor-in- 
jj* of the CURRENT 



BAKER'S 

We Seldom Say No! 

THE OFFICE PEOPLE 
IN NATCHITOCHES 

Phone NSU Hot-Line 352-6466 



CE shall file a "notice of 
v^tion 



with the Office of 
President of Student 
4u "s, containing the name 



on 



Page 7) 



^ the proposed business 
i^ a ger and the other most 
^Portant staff members. The 

%nittee shall determine 
jj ther or not each candidate 

Qualified to serve in the 



Radio /hack 



• LES (. fe M * 



SOUND CITY 

Tapes, Records, CB Equip. 
Stereo & Accessories 

Sonny Lavespere, Owner & Manager 
Broadmoor Shopping Center 352-5217 



Continuing Education serves a cause 



By Ken Landry 

Ever heard of the Division 
of Continuing Education' 1 

It was established in 1974 for 
the purpose of meeting the 
education needs of persons 
who may not be regularly 
enrolled students. 

The division, headed by Dr. 
Hoyt J. Reed, is responsible 
for coordinating the evening 
division classes, all off- 
campus classes, workshops, 
seminars and short courses. 

Instruction takes place 
mainly at five permanent 
centers which have been set 
up for this purpose. However, 
other sites for instruction are 
sometimes arranged upon 
request. 

Specific course offerings, 
workshops and educational 
presentations in various fields 
may be requested by business, 
industrial, or civic 
organizations, government 
agencies, school systems, or 
groups of individuals who 
have a common interest. 

Request for special classes 
should be made to the Division 
of Continuing Education in 



Caldwell Hall. 

The largest of the per- 
manent centers is located on 
the Fort Polk military 
reservation. This fall. Fort 
Polk reached a record 
enrollment of over 900 
students. 

Gasses are arranged into 
two eight-week terms and one 
16 week term. 

Gasses for the first eight 
week term and the 16 week 
term are already under way 
with registration for the 
second eight week term to be 
held Oct. 18. An additional 300 
students are expected to enroll 
then. 

According to Dr. Reed, the 
large enrollment is due to the 
greater number of permanent 
party personnel now stationed 
at Fort Polk. 

Gasses at Fort Polk are not 
limited to military personnel. 
Many dependents and 
civilians are attending 
classes. 

The other permanent 
centers are Warrington Place, 
for nurses, and Barksdale 
AFB in Shreveport, and 




KNWD OK's format 



The new KNWD 91.7 FM will 
sign on the air Friday at 3 
o'clock p. m., with a new 
format, according to Brad 
Palmer, Program Director of 
KNWD. 

The new format will prevent 
the same types of music being 
played three successive hours. 
Instead there will be a mix- 
ture of progressive jazz, 
progressive rock, progressive 
country, soul, disco, top 40, 
and especially cuts from 
newly released albums. 

In the early evenings the top 
40, album cuts, and the oldies, 
but goodies will be played. 
During the late evenings, the 
FM will focus on jazz, rock, 

country, and soul. On Sundays 
from 12:30 p. m. to 3:00 p. m., 
Christian rock music will be 
played. At 7:30 p. m., the 
series "The Shadow" will be 
broadcast, and from 9 : 00 p. m. 
to 12:00 p. m. all classical 
music will be played. 

Palmer said that they are 
looking for persons interested 
in helping with the top 40 
surveys, programming, news 
personnel, public relations, 
business department, and 
secretarial workers. 

New KNWD personnel are 
General Mgr., Chuck Cason; 
Program Director, Brad 



Palmer; Music Director, 
Danny Nance; Business Mgr., 
Joe Lang; Chief Engineer, 
Edmond Antie; and Senior 
Adviser, Gary Palmer. 

Disc jockeys are Jeff 
Gurter, Shannon Rose, Joe 
Marsiglio, Dale Neilson, 
Charles (Pepper) Thomas, 
Lionel Bourg, Donny Hymes, 
Toby Aldredge, Dale Sibley, 
Ron Thomas, Laura 
McKnight, David Carpenter, 
and John Huckabe. 

Disc jockeys in training are 
James (Tonto) Hollingsworth, 
Andrea Kippels, Dolly Arnold, 
Gary (Biggie Rat) Butler, 
Cathy Willis, Larry Pillmen, 
Scott Shaver, and Mike Mana. 



Schedule For 
Monday and Wednesday 

6:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Live 
12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Aut- 
omated 

3:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. Live 

2:00 a.m. to 6:00 a. 

m. Automated 

Tuesday & Thursday 

6:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. Live 
9:00 a. m. to 3:00 p. m. 

Automated 
3:00p.m.to2:00a.m. Live 
2:00 a.m. to 6:00 a. 
m. Automated 

Friday & Saturday 

(Mostly Automated) 




Longest lasting 

engine— 
starts instantly, 
generates happiness! 




CARTER JEWELRY 

114C HWY. 1 SOUTH PHONE 352-8940 



England AFB in Alexandria . 

Through an agreement 
between NSU and Ixmisiana 
College the Division of Con- 
tinuing Education offers a Gr- 
aduate Residence Program on 
the Louisiana College campus. 

Another phase of the 



program is one in which the 
Division of Continuing 
Fducation is working with the 
state of Louisiana and the 
Department of Corrections by 
offering college courses at 
Louisiana Corrections In- 
stitute i LCI i in DeQuincy. 



At LCI courses are offered 
in General Studies, welding 
and auto mechanics. 

Continuing Education is 
flourishing all over the U.S. 
because people are realizing 
that learning is not just for the 
young, said Dr. Reed. 



Media Center lists services 



The Media Center in Watson 
Memorial Library has many- 
services that students and 
faculty members don't know 
about, according to Mr. 
Robert Allen, head of the 
Media Division of Watson 
Library. 

Available in the Media 
Center are Reader Printout 
services which make a 
printout of anything on 
microfilm, microfiche, or 
microcard at a cost of 10 cents 

per print; transparencies and 
dittomasters 25 cents each; 
laminations, 25 cents per 
running foot; typewriter 

rentals, 25 cents per hour; 
tape duplications; and binding 
services. 

Also available in the center 
are pre-recorded cassette ta- 
pes, phonograph records, and 
a music studio designed for 
educational listening pur- 
poses. 

Other items for use in the 
library are: 16 mm opaque 



projectors, super-8 mm 
projectors, overhead 
projectors, film strip 
projectors, slide projectors, 
tape recorders and record 
players. Anyone wishing to 
use these items can make 
arrangements with Mr. Allen. 

Anyone wanting additional 
information on the Media 
Center may contact Mr. Allen 
at the library. 



Available on ultrafiche is 
the Library of American Civi- 
lization, which is a collection 
of materials relating to all 
aspects of American life and 
literature from their begin- 
nings to the outbreak of WWI, 
and on microfiche is the 
Library of English Literature, 
which covers a period of 
English literature from 
Beowulf to the year 1660. 



Society holds 
meeting 



The Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management 
will hold their first meeting of 
the semester Wednesday, 
Sept. 15 at 7 p. m. in Room 102 
of the Business Ad- 
ministration Bldg. 

The business related film "I 
Think" will be shown and 
should prove very interesting. 

Officers for the fall of 1976 
are Carl Riche, president; 



David Harding, treasurer; 
Keith Fontenot, secretary; 
Timothy Bonnette, publicity 
chairman, Joe Lang, program 
chairman and Steve Hudson, 
membership chairman. 

Anyone interested in 
learning about business and in 
talking with people who have 
similar interests are invited to 
this meeting. 



Spirit leaders win awards 



Northwestern's cheering 
squad walked off with several 
top awards when they par- 
ticipated at the National Spirit 
and Sportsmanship Workshop 
on the campus of Memphis 
State University August 14-18. 
the ten cheerleaders won five 
superior ribbons, two ex- 
cellent ribbons, a gold 
superior ribbon and a spirit 
stick. 

Participating in the 
workshop which consisted of 
three sessions a day in 
cheering, gymnastics, and 
songleading were Cheryl 
Babcock, Stan Haynes, Bonnie 



Outlaw, Mary Lyn Bartek, 
Rhonda Henson, Micheal 
Dykes, Jamie Sanders, and 
Kathy Kelly. Fonda Henson 
and Evelyn Ashley, the two 
alternate cheerleaders, also 
attended. 

The awards the 
cheerleaders received were 
won in several events 
throughout the week. The five 
superiors, the highest rating, 
were won on cheers the squad 
performed. The excellent 
ribbons were given from the 
pom-pom routine and a 
sideline routine. 

The gold superior was won 
for having one of the four best 



cheers that day and the spirit 
stick was given to them for the 
spirit they demonstrated 
throughout the clinic. 

The cheerleaders hope to be 
able to use a bullhorn during 
the football games so that they 
will be heard and so that the 
audience will be able to cheer 
with them. 

Pep rallies have tentatively 
been scheduled for 5 p.m. 
beside the field where the 
football team practices. Any 
change in this will be an- 
nounced. 




GRAB THE DONKEY BY THE classes but immediately find that 

TAIL — Northwestern State not confronting the "matter" head 

University students often grab on can prove quite messy. Or what's 

"matters" by the tail during there to tell but a fistful of "tail"— 

registration and sometimes during no more, no less. 



CARRY-OUT ORDERS: 

CATFISH DINNERS, SHRIMP BASKETS, & 
GUMBO OR CREOLE OVER RICE. 

10% DISCOUNT FOR ALL NSU STUDENTS AND 
FACULTY MEMBERS WITH ID 9jm 

FRESH: CATFISH, BUFFALO, SALT WATER FISH, SHRIMP, 
OYSTERS, AND CRAB 

FRENCH BREAD FROM NEW ORLEANS & 
THE COLDEST BEER IN TOWN! 

ALSO WEDDING, ANNIVERSARY 
& BIRTHDAY CAKES MADE BY JEAN LEE. 

CALL AHEAD FOR ORDERS 
PHONE 352-4792 GRAND EC0RE ROAD 



0?* 



LEE'S 

Food 

MART 



Page 8 CURRENT SAUCE September 14. 1976 



Mac Kenzie named director 






SMILE A LITTLE SMILE FOR ME— Many 
college students would pay their weight in gold to 
return to the days of sling shots, marbles, little 
league baseball, paper cap pistols and water cap 
pistols. But of course such a return is impossible 
and we've found that Boogieman still exists but 
now we know him as Final Exams. 

College life isn't all bad, it really has its good 
moments-you'll just have to accept the face that it 
will take all four years to find them. 



Apprentices needed 



NEW DIRECTOR NAMED— Dr. 
Mac Kenzie, new director of the 
veterinary technology program at 
NSU. checks the physical condition 



of San Ei Sen, an Arabian gelding 
which Donald Miller of Shreveport, 
La., donated to the NSU Foundation 
for use in the equine science 
program. 



Family Day plans announced 



Two openings exist on the 
POTPOURRI staff for Fresh- 
nan apprentices, according to 
the editor. Patsy Black. 

Freshmen interested in the 
apprentice positions should 
have had experience on their 
high school yearbook staff, 
preferably as editor, Black 
said. Staff members of the 
POTPOURRI most be sure 
they will have the necessary 
time to devote to the year- 
book's needs, the editor said. 



Those who wish to apply for 
these staff positions may write 
a letter of application to the 
POTPOURRI editor, stating 
their desire to work as a staff 
member, their experience 
with yearbooks, and other 
pertinent information. 

Application letters may be 
sent to, or left with, the 
POTPOURRI adviser, Ezra 
Adams, Rm. 225, Arts and 
Sciences Bldg. Deadline for all 
applications is Sept. 15, Editor 
Black said. 



Marvin L. Horton 

NSU, along with parents, 
children and faculty, will join 
together as one "Big Happy 
Family" on Sept. 25th to ob- 
serve its annual NSU "Family 
Day." 

"Family Day" is a day NSU 
sets aside to entertain the 
parents and families of 
students attending the 
university. The day will in- 
clude a reception beginning at 
2 p.m. in the Student Union 
Ballroom. Refreshments will 
be served and parents will be 
able to visit with faculty 
members, administrators, the 
coaching staff and members 

of the student body. The 
Entertainers will also take 
part in making Family Day a 



day to remember. 

President Arnold R. 
Kilpatrick and Head Football 

Coach A. L. Williams welcome 
the parents of the students, 
according to Dr. C. B. Ellis, of 

director of external affairs. 

The family is also invited to 
dine with their scholars at 4:30 
p.m. in Iberville cafeteria at a 
nominal fee. After which the 
family may attend the Delta 
State vs. NSU football game 
free of charge. The game will 
be played in the new Harry 

'Rags' Turpin Stadium at 7:30 
p.m. 

During the day the family 
may become familiar with the 



campus and also visit the 
students' rooms at Open 
House of the dormitories from 
1:00-4:30 p.m. 

"We hope that you will be 
able to be with us, get to know 
us, and work with us in 
making Northwestern a better 
university," said Richard H. 
Galloway, vice president of 
student affairs. 

The family may pick up 
their official name tags at the 
reception. This tag will enable 
them to attend the football 
game at no charge. "NSU: 76- 
Year of the Demons," you can 
be a part, so come on out and 
take part! 



Support Your 
Local Merchants 



5?CK 



COLLEGE 



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c *Focu§ed oiv 
<v\ll StudeatS 

Make your appointment now for 

your YEARBOOK PORTRAITS at 

STUDENT UNION LOBBY 
8-4 DAILY, SEPT. 13-17 

FACULTY AND STUDENTS 



When you think 
of men swear.... 
think of J$ 



Capuan'S 



Located next to Broadmoor Shopping Center 



Three Columns 



1 litl 

Key ser 
named to staff 

According to an an- 
nouncement by Northwestern 
State University president. 
Dr. Arnold R. Kilpatrick. Dan 
Key ser, a native of Ohio, has 
been appointed assistant 
professor of speech and 
journalism at NSU. 

Keyser will also serve as 
technical director of the 
University Theatre and the A. 
A. Fredericks Fine Arts 
Center Auditorium. 

This summer, Keyser was a 
theatre consultant to 
professional stage scenery 
designer John Ezell of the 
Great Lakes Shakesphere 
Festival Company, Ohio. 

He was an instructor, 
resident designer and 
technical director last year at 
Eastern Kentucky University, 
where he created the stage 
scenery for the classic 
musical "Music Man." 

NSU's new technical 
director has designed stage 
scenery for more than 20 
theatre productions, including 
Whitting's "The Devils," 
"Delicate Balance" by Ablee 
and "Kanjincho," a 13th 
century Japanese play to 
name a few. 

Keyser received a Bachelor 
of Arts degree in drama and 
speech from Hanover College 
in Indiana, and earned a 
Master of Fine Arts degree in 
theatre from the University of 
Wisconsin in Madison. 



lii*>ii*ilifclll'*ft» 



In addition to studying 
under Ezell and Scott. Keyser 

has also studied with Gil 
Hensley. lighting designer for 
the Houston Grand Opera and 
director of lighting design for 
many of the opera productions 
in New York. 



Doolev 
joins dept. 

William Kenneth Dooley, a 
long-time minister of music in 
Shreveport, has joined the 
faculty of the Department of 
Music at Northwestern State 
University as an assistant 
professor of voice and con- 
ductor of the University Choir. 

Northwestern president Dr. 
Arnold R. Kilpatrick an- 
nounced the appointment of 
Dooley, who served from 1953 
until this summer as minister 
of music for the First Baptist 
Church in Shreveport. For the 
past two years he has also 
been a part-time voice in- 
structor at Centenary College 
in Shreveport. 

He received his Bachelor of 
Music degree from West- 
minster Choir College in 
Princeton, N.J., and sang for 
four years with the world 
famous Westminister Choir. 

As a member of the West- 
minster Choir, he sang in 66 
performances with the New 
York Philharmonic and 30 
with the Philadelphia Sym- 
phony under such conductors 
as Arturo Toscanini, Artur 
Rodzinski, Leopold Stokowski, 
Bruno Walter, Eugene Or- 
mandy and Leonard Bern- 



Bryant Joins 
Art Department 



Dr. Billy J. Bryant has been 
appointed professor of art at 
Northwestern State 
University, according to an 
announcement by NSU 
president Dr. Arnold R. 
Kilpatrick. 

The new NSU art professor, 
whose appointment becomes 
effective immediately, comes 
to the university from 
Morehead State University in 
Kentucky where he was an 
associate professor of art. 

Bryant is best known for his 
abstract acrylic paintings 
which depict strong themes 
based on American Indian 
culture. At present he has 
works of art included in the 
permanent collections of The 
Corcoran School of Art 
Museum in Washington, D.C., 
and private galleries in 
Louisville and Lexington, Ky. 

In addition to his painting, 
Bryant is also an accomplish- 
ed craftsman who is skilled in 
the art of dulcimer and fiddle 
construction. He was recently 
commissioned to make 



CONTINENTAL TRAILWAYS BUS LINES SCHEDULE 



LEAVE NATCHITOCHES, 














LOUISIANA 


6:30A 


10:40A 


2: OOP 


6:40P 


9:40P 


3:10A 


ARR SHREVEPORT, LA 


8:20A 


12:25P 


3:30P 


8:20P 


11:20P 


4:55A 


ARR DALLAS, TEXAS 


12:30P 


4:30P 


9:20P 


12:15A 


3:35A 


10-.15A 


(All points North & West) 














ARR LOS ANGLES, CALIF 


11:59P 


5:10A 


10:10A 


9:30A 


1:55P 


6:10P 


LEAVE NATCHITOCHES, LA 


3:45A 


7:05A 


10:50A 


1:15P 


3:05P 


7:20P 


ARR ALEXANDRIA, LA 


5:05A 


9:00A 


12:15P 


2:40P 


4:30P 


8:45P 


ARR BATON ROUGE, LA 


9:10A 


12:25P 


3:25P 


5:37P 


7:40P 


11:50P 


ARR NEW ORLEANS, LA 


11:05A 


2:30P 


5:05P 


7:15P 


9:20P 


1:40A 


i All points East & West from New Orleans, La. ) 











FARES COST FROM NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA TO : 
Alexandria, La. $3.30 Baton Rouge, I,a. $10.20 

New Orleans. La. $13.45 Shreveport , La . $4.15 

Dallas, Texas $17.70 Los Angeles, Calif. $88.95 

New York, N. Y. $81.25 Texarkana Ark., Tex. $8.65 

Houston, Texas $18.80 St. Louis, Mo. $39.90 

Chicago, 111. $53.70 San Francisco. Calif. $97.45 

SPECIAL INFORMATION : Beginning 30 September, 1976, a 15 Day EAGLE TRIP to any poin 
or city within the United States, cost $165.00 per person. Trip must be completed within 15 days 
limit. 

EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY: Special Trips in September. A party of two or more persons 
round trip from Natchitoches, to destination and return to Natchitoches, La. cost of fare will be 
l' j times the cost of a ONE WAY fare per person. Example. Round Trip From Natchitoches 
Louisiana to Dallas, Texas: Cost of fare ONE WAY is $17.70 per persons. Cost of the R..und Trip 
per person From Natchitoches to Dallas and return will be $26.55. Normal Round Trip Fare is 
$33.65. 

For Special Charter Trip using Trailways Bus, call Mr. Coleman. 352-8341. 



dulcimers for Morehead State 
University president Adron 
Do ran and a former lieutenant 
governor in Kentucky. Some 
32 dulcimers have been 
handmade by Bryant. 

Northwestern's new 
professor of art received his 
B.A. degree in art from 
Centenary College in 
Shreveport in 1959. He earned 
a M.F.A. degree in painting 
from The Corcoran School of 
Art at George Washington 
University in 1966 and was 
awarded the D.Ed, degree in 
art education from Penn- 
sylvania State University in 
1974. 

He has previously taught art 
at the University of Kentucky 
and at Louisiana College in 
Pineville. He has served as a 
supervisor of student art 
teachers at the Navajo 
reservation in Kayenta, Ariz., 
and at the University of 
Kentucky. 

Bryant's paintings have 
appeared in one and two-man 
shows in Louisiana, 
California, Panama, 
Washington, D.C., Virginia, 
Kentucky and Pennsylvania. 

He has won first and second 
place and honorable mention 
awards at juried shows across 
the country. One of Bryant's 
paintings was judged best of 
show at the Louisiana Arts 
Festival at Hodges Gardens a 
few years ago. 




UNWANTED hair from the 
arms, legs 4 face 

REMOVED. ..quickly and 
permanently by a Registered 
Eleclrologtst. "G. J." 
Johnson, 1013 Parkway Drive, 
Phone 352-4983. By 
pointment only! 



ap 



stein. 

In 1970. Dooley sang with th 
Centurymen, a men's choru! 
of Southern Baptist Minister, 
of Music, on the Bob Hop* 
Independence Day televisj^ 
show in Washington D.C. jj ( 



recently conducted 



the 



Shreveport Symphony ^ 
performances of "The Ger, 
man Requiem" by Brahni and 
"A City of the King" and The 
Centurion by Jack Coleman 
and Ralph Carmichael. 

During the 23 years t na , 
Dooley served as minister [ 
music for the First Baptist 
Church of Shreveport, m ure 
than 30 persons who sang ^ 
his church choirs became fmj. 
time professional musicians 

A number of students who 
received private instruction 
from Dooley have won 
prestigious awards and have 
become professional singers 
teachers and ministers f 
music. Dooley has also con- 
ducted numerous choir 
clainics and festivals 
throughout the Ark-La-Tex 
area. 

Dooley, who received his 
Masters of Arts degree from 
Louisiana Tech is a member 
of the National Association of 
Teachers of Singing, the 
American Guild of Musical 
Artists, Choristers Guild and 
the Northwest Louisiana 
Association of Baptist 
Canisters of Music. 

He is married to the former 
Priscilla Ann Krahl of Akron, 
Ohio, and they are the parents 
of two daughters and one son. 



Research 

paper printed 

A scientific research paper 
co-authored by an assistant 
professor of microbiology at 
Northwestern State 
University has been accepted 
for publication by the 
Canadian Journal of Micro- 
biology. 

The paper is entitled 
"Isolation and Charac- 
terization of a Bacteriocin 
Produced by Bacillus 
Stearothermophilus Strain 10" 
and was Co-authored by Dr. 
Benny D. Barridge of NSU and 
Ronald Yule who was a 
graduate student during the 
investigation. Yule is now a 
sanitarian for the Beauregard 
Parish Public Health 
Department. 



Barridge said Bacteriocins 
are antimicrobial agents 
produced by one strain of 
bacteria that kill closely 
related bacteria. The agents 
have received much attention 
in recent years as a possible 
method of controlling 
organisms that have become 
resistant to antibiotics. 

The NSU researcher said 
this investigation and the 
resulting paper describe the 
isolation and properties of one 
such agent. 

Barridge has been on the 
teaching faculty of the 
university's Department of 
Microbiology a " 
Biochemistry since 1974. He 
received his bachelor's and 
master's degrees from NSU 
and his Ph.D degree from the 
University of Nebraska. 

A native of Winn Parish, 
barridge has conducted othe 
scientific investigations on th 
cell walls of thermoph 1 " 
bacteria, thermophilic bac 
teriophage, thermocm-lC 
biodegradation of arorna^ 
hydrocarbons and hemolr 1 
mutants of streptococci- 
He is a member ot tseia *> et * 
Beta national honora" 
biological sciences society- 
the American Society ° 
Microbiology, Sigma T 
Research Society and th 
Louisiana Academy 
Sciences. 



"GEOH( 
service i 
at a Ft)' 
Mike B; 
pecan pi 
shakers 

Fa 

NSU, alon 
faculty, 
3ig Happy 
8erve its at 
"Family I 
ide to en 
milies of 
aversity. ' 
teption be 
Jident Unio 
ill be serve 
visit wit 
injstrators 
ettibers of 
■tertainers 
*ng Fan 
r. 

Resident 
«d Footbi 
tlcome the 
fording to 
tonal aff a 
lie family 



'NSU Mar 
*nises to t 
^ has ev 
m, dire 
Vsity. 
^ 94 me: 
« 18, n 
"fiance oft 
tyin Foot 
6r >ed their 
'music of 
"then wen 
16 entitle 
^ey whic 
Jfrites as 
J* Sadd 
I* NSU b 
' directio 
itl >re and I 
a Perform 
J the tele 
"orming 

omi 

J* 1 * cast f 
h * Haile; 
' been at 
ir >associ 
^alisma 

J^cludei 
y Levass 
S, and 
Who's Hi 

e °fSout 
> takes 
b Texas 
, ^ show 
^theNSl 
Box Off 



"*• 



^CURRENT SAUCE 



sang with th e 
nen's chor^ 
ist Minister, 
e Bob Hope 
»>• televisi,, 
ton D.c. jj ( 
ucted t Ji« 
mphony ^ 
• The G er . 
y Brahni am) 
>g"and "The 
<* Coleman 
ichael. 

years that 
; minister f 
'irst Baptis, 
e Pi»rt. more 
who sang j„ 
became fmj. 
I musicians 

tudents who 
1 instruction 
have won 
ds and have 
>nal singers 
ninisters f 
as also con- 
ous choir 
festivals 
Ark-La-Tex 



•eceived his 
degree from 
s a member 
ssociation of 
inging, the 
of Musical 
s Guild and 
Louisiana 

f 

c. 



Vol. LXIV, No. 3 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 



NATCHITOCHES. LOUISIANA 



September 21, 1976 



Baptist 



3 the former 
hi of Akron, 
! the parents 
and one son. 




inted 

iarch paper 
n assistant 
obiology at 
n State 
;n accepts 
by the 
of Micro- 



s entitled 
Charac- 
Bacteriocin 
Bacillus 
is Strain 10" 
red by Dr. 
of NSU and 
ho was a 
during the 
e is now a 
Beauregard 
Health 



iacteriocins 
al agents 
i strain of 
ill closely 
The agents 
;h attention 
i a possible 
:ontrolling 
ive become 
jtics. 

rcher said 
n and the 
jscribe the 
rties of one 



"GEORGE AT THE SALAD BAR — This semester a new food 
service is running the cafeteria, Saga Food Service. Recently, 
at a Food Service Committee Meeting, Cafeteria Manager, 
Mike Bales, promised several changes. Hot chocolate and 
pecan pie will soon be available, and more salt and pepper 
shakers have been ordered according to Bales. 

Family Day planned 

]NS0\ along with parents, children 
id faculty, will join together as one 
pg Happy Family" on Sept. 25th to 
terve its annual NSU "Family Day." 
Tamily Day" is a day NSU sets 
we to entertain the parents and 
milies of students attending the 
iversity. The day will include a 
teption beginning at 2 p.m. in the 
Ment Union Ballroom. Refreshments 
SI be served and parents will be able 
visit with faculty members, ad- 
inistrators, the coaching staff and 
ahbers of the student body. The 
fiertainers will also take part in 
Family Day a day to remem- 



ftesident Arnold R. Kilpatrick and 
"»d Football Coach A. L. Williams 
>lcome the parents of the students, 
tording to Dr. C. B. Ellis, director of 
krnal affairs. 

The family is also invited to dine with 



fond shows promise 



their scholars at 4:30 p.m. in Iberville 
cafeteria at a nominal fee. After which 
the family may attend the Delta State 
vs. NSU football game free of charge. 
The game will be played in the new 
Harry 'Rags' Turpin Stadium at 7:30 
p.m. 

During the day the family may 
become familiar with the campus and 
also visit the students' rooms at Open 
House of the dormitories from 1 : 00-4: 30 
p.m. 

"We hope that you will be able to be 
with us, get to know us, and work with 
us in making Northwestern a better 
university," said Richard H. Galloway, 
vice president of student affairs. 

The family may pick up their official 
name tags at the reception. This tag 
will enable them to attend the football 
game at no charge. "NSU: 76-Year of 
the Demons," you can be a part, so 
come on out and take part! 



NSU Marching Band for 1976-77 
""lises to be the best marching band 
& has ever had," said Dr. Jerry 
toe, director of bands at the 
■•ersity. 

^ e 94 member band took the field 
18, marking their first per- 
"^ce of this season in the new Rags 
'Pin Football Stadium. The band 
"ted their halftime performance to 
1 music of "Payne's Grand Entry" 
' then went directly into a precision 
116 entitled "Trooper Salute," a 
***y which included such musical 
Jfites as "Hang 'Em High" and 
JJ* Saddles." 

NSU band's twirling line, under 
direction of Sherry Anderson, 
^e and head twirler, was featured 
Performance of the theme music 



een on the 
y of the 
irtment o f 
y and 
e 1974. He 
lelor's and 
from NSU 
ee from the 
raska. 

Parish, 
acted other 
tionsonthe 
lermophi^ 
,hilic bac 
xin-10, th* 

aromatic 

hemolyt* 

cocci. 

it beta £> eta 
honorary 

;s society ^ ho>s Now? " i s a hilarious 

Society °| 

;igma ,M 
and * 

demy ° f 



university twirlers Rose Scarlato, 
Darlinda Cook, Robin Rose, Julie Scott, 
Debra King, Mary Pat Baldridge, 
Donna Vaughn, Sonya Pullin, Teresa 
Higdon, and Laura McKnight. 

The marching Demons will attend 
only one road game due to insufficient 
funds. The Louisiana Tech vs. NSU 
game, which is Tech's home game in 
Shreveport, will be attended by the De- 
mon band but they will not perform. 

The half-time of Nicholls State game 
Oct. 9, will feature Jimmy Davis and 
Co., with the back up of NSU Marching 
Band. Davis will entertain with 
spirituals, "I Can't Stop Loving You," 
and "You Are My Sunshine." 

In promoting NSU, the band will take 
part in a parade and barbecue in Zwolle 
honoring Bill Dodd, a well-known 
politician and graduate of NSU. 



1(11 the television show "S. W. A. T." 
'Ornung with Miss Anderson was 

omedy production planned 

S cast for the NSU production of 
l Ver Hailey's "Who's Happy Now?" 
jj ken announced by Ray Schex- 
r r > associate professor of speech and 
realism and director of the play. The 
Excludes Bill Adger, Bob Gilmore, 
Levasseur, Rick Barnickle, Ginni 
U^g. and Kay Baumgarmer. 
i ^*o's Happy Now?" is a hilarious 
Jj e °f Southwestern Americana. The 
L^ n takes place in a barroom in the 

Texas town of Sunray. 
L he show will be presented at 7:30 p. 
"■the NSU Little Theatre, Oct. 13-16. 
B °x Office opens Oct. 4, 1-6 p. m. 



Monday-Friday. The number is 357- 
4179. General admission is $1.50, NSU 
faculty and Staff is 50 cents, non-NSU 
students, 75 cents; and NSU students, 
ID'S. 

Also beginning Oct. 4, interested 
persons may purchase NSU Theatre 
Season Tickets. Tickets for the general 
public will be $5.00. Members of the 
NSU faculty and staff may purchase 
theirs for $1.00. 

"Who's Happy Now?" is NSU's entry 
in this year's Louisiana division of the 
American College Theatre Festival. 
The Festival will be held in Baton 
Rouge, Oct. 21-25. 



Theme chosen 



'Proudly we hail 



"Proudly We Hail...." an excerpt 
from our national anthem "The Star 
Spangled Banner" has been chosen as 
the theme of the 1976 Demon 
Homecoming celebration to be held 
Saturday, November 13. 

According to Debbie Hebert, 
Homecoming coordinator, all activities 
and plans are being centered around 
student involvement and participation. 

The Homecoming Committee met 
last Wednesday to begin organizing and 
planning the numerous activities for 
this year's bicentennial homecoming 
theme. 

In order to promote the theme, a 
display contest is being planned. 



Displays will be built along the same 
lines as a float except that they will 
remain stationary and need not be 
placed on a flatbed or other type of 
truck. Cash prizes will be given for the 
winning first place displays in four 
categories: Greeks, resident halls, 
interest or professional groups, and an 
overall grand prize. 

Taking into consideration Dr. C. B. 
Ellis's remarks reemphasizing the 
need for getting the students into the 
spirit of Homecoming, the committee 
worked out a tentative schedule of 
events for Friday, Nov. 12 and Satur- 
day, Nov. 13. 

The schedule for Friday, Nov. 12 



Elections revised 



by Stan Tyler 

This is the second story of a three 
part story written in conjunction with 
the rewriting of the constitution of the 
SGA of Northwestern. The third and 
final story will be a summary of all the 
revisions made in the constitution. 

One of the articles that was beefed up 
and clarified was Article five, the 
elections article. 

Whenever an election is held, voting 
machines will be used. If the machines 
cannot be obtained, locked ballot boxes 
will be used. During an election the 
Commissioner of Elections, if running 
for an office, will not work at the polls. 
Other than this, his job is to run the 
election. 

Under the new constitution poll 
watchers may be appointed by the 
candidates. 

Under Article 2, Sec. 6, Clauses 1, 2, & 
3 list the duties of the Commissioner of 
Election. A Commissioner of Elections 
shall be elected by the members of the 
student body to serve for a term of one 
year, as provided for by the Con- 
stitution. 

He shall have completed at least 45 
semester hours of academic work. 

He shall serve as chairman of the 
Elections Board which shall supervise 
all elections conducted by the SGA. 

The Commissioner shall appoint the 



members of the Elections Board 
subject to approval of the Senate. 

Also under Article 5, Sec. 4, Clause 6, 
any protest shall be heard by the 
Student Supreme Court if presented in 
writing to the Commissioner of Elec- 
tions within 48 hours after the ann- 
ouncement of the winners. The 
determination of a majority in all 
elections shall be defined according to 
Louisiana Law. Under the old con- 
stitution the protest had to be filed 48 
hours after the election. 

Sometimes the winners are not an- 
nounced for two to three days after the 
elections. This would make it im- 
possible for a person to make a valid 
protest. 

Under Article 6, Committees and 
Boards, the committees are listed and 
provisions have been made for the 
Senate to adopt all guidelines for the 
various committees. Under the old 
constitution all the committees were 
listed along with a list of the guidelines. 
Under Article 7, all fees will remain the 
same. This should be of great interest to 
the students. 

In Article 8, Loan Fund, the long term 
loan was abolished. This was due to the 
slow rate of repayment. 

The new Constitution will run for 
three consecutive weeks to allow the 
student ample time to study it. This will 
be the second week for it to be run. 



Filing closes today 



Persons interested in running for 
class senator for the Student Govern- 
ment Association should file in Dr. 
Galloway's office before 4 p. m. this 
afternoon. Nine senators will be 
elected, two from each undergraduate 
class and one for the graduate school. 

All candidates for senator must have 
an over-all 2.0 grade point average. 

Elections will be held next Tuesday, 
Sept. 28, with runoffs being held the 
following Tuesday, Oct. 5. 

Also on the ballot for Sept. 28 will be a 
student referendum in which students 



will be able to indicate whether they 
would like to have a Mardi Gras holiday 
in the Spring. It should be understood 
that a Mardi Gras holiday would 
shorten the holiday for Easter. 

The proposed new SGA Constitution 
will be voted on in conjunction with the 
runoff election on Oct. 5. The complete 
constitution can be found inside Current 
Sauce. 

Today at 4 : 30 p. m. is the deadline for 
filing for these openings. Applications 
may be obtained in Rm. 214 of the 
Student Union. 



KNOC airs games 



by Bob Rash 

KNOC AM, the radio station in 
Natchitoches, is the home of the Demon 
Football Network that covers all the 
football games played by the NSU 
Demons. 

Norm Fletcher, the "Voice of Nor- 
thwestern" for the past 23 years, is the 
anchorman who returns for another 
season of reporting the play-by-play 
action. Also, he is currently holding 
onto a 19 year consecutive streak of 
calling the action for the fans. Assisting 
him this year will be Roger Williams, a 
former Northwestern football standout. 
Williams is in his first year with the 
network and has served as an officer 
for the NSU Booster Club for the past 
four years. 

The network, which has expanded 
over the years to cover several cities, 
has expanded again this year so that 
they will be covering eight cities in 
North, Central, and Southwest 
Louisiana. The network will reach fans 
in Shreveport, Alexandria, Leesville, 
Jonesboro, Winnfield, Many, and 
Natchitoches. KJVC-FM in Mansfield 



joins the others this year in covering 
the Demons. 

KNOC will have a 15 minute pre- 
game and a 15 minute post-game show 
that will be broadcast each week. 
KNOC will carry all ten games with 
coverage starting at the Lamar Tech 
game. 

KWKH-AM and KROK-FM will 
handle the action for the entire season 
for the Shreveport fans this year. 
KWKH will cover four games and 
KROK will handle the other six. The 
four carried by KWKH will include 
Arkansas State, La. Tech, McNeese 
State, and USL. 

KTOC-FM in Jonesboro, KVCL-FM, 
KWLA-AM in Many, and KDLA-FM in 
DeRidder will cover the same games as 
KWKH. 

The Northeast La. game is the only 
game that will not be carried by KDBS 
FM in Alexandria. 

According to Head Football coach A. 
L. Williams the radio will help the fans 
all over the state to be a part of the 
excitement of every game. 



begins with a spiriful pep rally to be 
held in the Coliseum. A presentation of 
the court will be the next order of 
business for the evening, also to be held 
in the Coliseum. 

The highlight of the evening will be 
the announcement of the Homecoming 
queen during the pre-game dance. This 
event will be located in the Coliseum. 
More specific information as to a time 
schedule will be provided as plans are 
finalized. 

Saturday's activities begin with 
registration in the Student Union from 
noon to 5 p. m. Tickets for the game will 
be on sale and a reception is scheduled 
from noon to 2 p. m. in the Student 
Union. 

The time period from 2-4:30 p. m. has 
been set aside so that the Greek, 
religious, professional and interest 
groups could plan Open House or a 
small reception without conflicting with 
any other events. 

An alumni dinner and an Alumni 
Association meeting are being planned. 

The highlight of Saturday's events 
will be the football game between the 
Northwestern Demons and the USL 
Ragin' Cajuns. Kick-off is scheduled for 
7:30 p. m. in the Harry "Rags" Turpin 
Stadium. Pre-game activities such as 



the presentation of the court are ten- 
tatively scheduled to begin at 7 p. m. 

The various Homecoming com- 
mittees and their members are as 
follows: Publicity: Jerry Pierce, Jim 
Johnson, and Colette Oidmixon; 
Display Contest: Dr. Grady Harper and 
Gary Brown; Court: Dean Frederick 
Bosarge, Clinton Davis, Julia Beeson, 
Tommie Jean Hebert, Colette Oid- 
mixon, and Debra Kilman; Registrati- 
on: Loran Lindsay, Barbara Gillis and 
Branda Greer; Reception: Robert 
Wilson, Donna King, Dr. Richard 
Galloway, Dr. Allen Bonnette, and the 
external affairs staff. 

Other committees are Student 
Dance: Rory Alexander and Glenda 
LaCaze; Alumni Meal: Cecil Knotts, 
Dr. Stan Chadick, Mrs. Margaret 
Ackel, and Judy Gremillion; Open 
Houses: Mrs. Mamie Trunzler, Leigh 
Perkins, Dee Villard, and Larry 
Flower; Pre-game and Half-time: Dr. 
Jerry Payne, Dr. William Hunt, Jim 
Johnson, and the Demon cheerleaders; 
and the Demon Booster Club will 
handle the Demon Gift Shop. 

Any suggestions or ideas for 
Homecoming should be directed to the 
Office of External Affairs (4414), Rm. 
114, Caldwell Hall. 



Will it ever open? 



by Muffert Richardson 

Though to some students it may seem 
forever, mid-November could possibly 
be the opening date of Phase I in the 
NSU recreational facilities. 

The Research and Development 
committee met last week with 
recreational architect assistant Mark 
Davis, who explained how the complex 
is progressing and discussed final plans 
for Phase H. 

Phase I includes an extension of 
utilities, pool, pool building and a road 
to the complex. The opening of Phase I 
has been moved to mid-November due 
to a holdup in the completion of a 
parking area and a plumbing error. 

Bill Hochstetler, Intramural 
Director, was hired as of July 1 to work 
full-time as Pool Manager. The pool, 
once opened, will have a season of five 



to six months, opening in late April or 
early May and closing in late October. 

Final details will soon be covered for 
Phase II plans and the bid for this 
section is expected to go out within the 
next few months. Phase II will include 
four tennis courts, a nine-hole golf 
course, a pro shop, landscaping and 
several picnic areas. 

The idea of creating more 
recreational facilities for NSU students 
originated in 1969 with the students of 
the Student Union Governing Board. In 
1972 the university accepted federal 
funds from the Dept. of the Interior 
covering half the cost of the project. 
The Research and Development 
committee is elected annually by the 
students to see that these funds are 
spent in a manner approved both by 
students and the state. 



Hot Sauce 

When did the words to the NSU fight 
song get changed? 

They didn't. Last week Current Sauce 
printed the fight song and the last line 
was printed wrong due to a 
typographical error. It was printed to 
read "fight for dead old Demon Land! " 
It should read "fight for dear old 
Demon Land!" 

The entire fight song has been 
reprinted this week. 

There was also another mistake in 
last weeks paper. In the Kappa Sigma 
section of Greek Review, the statement 
"We are currently planning future 
exchanges with other sororities," was 
misprinted to read "We are currently 
planning future exchanges with out 
sororities." 

Current Sauce apologizes for the 
mistakes. 

Why is the infirmary closed on 
weekends? 

According to a university spokesman, 
students are hereby instructed not to 
get sick on weekends. 

Seriously, according to Hot Tang, "A 
shortage of revenues and a shortage of 
nurses would be the diagnosis." 

The new infirmary hours are: Sun- 
day, 2 p. m. to 10 p. m.; Monday- 
Thursday, 6 a. m. to 10 p. m. ; Friday, 6 
a. m. to 2 p. m.; Saturday, closed. 

Is it true that SGA will soon be selling 
beer on campus? 

According to Senate Chairman Bob 
Ryder, "We're working on it!" 

Recently the Board of Trustees lifted 
their restriction that said universities 
in their system couldn't sell beer on 
campus. The decision leaves it up to the 
local governing authority, in our case 
the Natchitoches City Council, as to 
whether beer can be sold. 

After the Board took this action, 
Ryder introduced a resolution in the 



Student Senate to "urge and request the 
city council to waive the city ordinance 
which restricts the sale of beer on the 
Northwestern campus." 

It has not been decided how the beer 
would be sold or who would sell it if the 
council approves the SGA request. 

September 22 & 23 

Music and Films Committee 
presents 
"Five Easy Pieces" 
starring Jack Nicholson 
7 :30 p. m. Arts & Science Aud. 

SUGBfilin* 

Deadline for filing for SUGB rep-at- 
large and decorations committee 
chairman is 4:30 today. Interested 
persons should go by room 214 in the 
Student Union. 

LOB <>— <> 

Lady of the Bracelet entries will still 
be accepted today and tomorrow until 
4:30. Entry fee is $5. Entry forms may 
be picked up and returned to Room 214 
of the Student Union. 

The Student Union Governing Board 
has allocated funds for the financing of 
LOB. These funds will be used for stage 
decoration, trophies, crowns and other 
costs of the pageant. 

NSU students working as members of 
this year's production staff under Betty 
Williamson, executive director, are 
Becky Nix, graduate advisor; Judy 
Gremillion, programs; Debbie Bose 
and Carol Martin, judges; Cheryl 
Purcell and Jamie Sanders, scenery; 
Colette Oldmixion, emcee and script; 
Julia Beeson, hospitality; Debbie Bose, 
flowers and awards; Glenda LaCaze, 
visiting queens; Donna Brumley, 
publicity; Liz Posey, secretary; Laurie 
Butler, music; Leigh Perkins, 
tabulations; Debbie Rodriquez, 
choreography; John McKellar and Earl 
Hebert, stage crew; and Rory 
Alexander, security. 



Page 2 CURRENT SAUCE September 21. 1976 





THAT'S i3£c~ause XouVE 




Co's Corner 




GRAB 



DONKEY 



Pardon our slip 11 is ^ an honor to 

represent Northwestern in 
Sometimes, no matter how various beauty pageants as 
hard you work or how many either a Participant or guest, 
times you check something You , ge t t a chance to meet 
over, mistakes seem to be 



made. Last week's issue hit 
-the jackpot when it came to 



learn new things and make 
new friends. 
Cheryl Purcell, this year's 



bloopers. Dr. Bryant, no pun Udy of the Bracelet, would 

was intended when we ran not trade the experiences, 

your picture. joys, friendships, and op- 

:"■ : Two other major errors portunities she has had. 

= were typographical ones Take a chance. Today and 

• which we did not catch. It is tomorrow are the only days 

not "dead" demon land, but Lf V° g ,°, by Rm " 214 in the 

"dear old Demon land." The Student Umon and become a 

other blunder occured in the ja^P™ 1 in the 1976 Lady of 

„ . the Bracelet pageant. 

-•■Kappa Sigma story. ^ ^ ^ 

What else can be said except could hoW for you , 
we will try harder the next 

time? False alarms 



IMAGINE! 



; " IMAGINE - your name in 
lights (or at least, in the 
newspapers), your picture 
S 'displayed in newspapers, 
; ;magazines, brochures, and a 
;:hundred new adventures just 
waiting for you! This and 
more could be just around the 
~_ : cprner for you! 

How? you ask. Simply stop 
1 by Rm. 214 of the Student 
£ Union and fill out an entry 
form to become a contestant 
in the Lady of the Bracelet 
beauty pageant. 

I^ady of the Bracelet is a 
preliminary to the Miss 
Louisiana beauty pageant. 
Miss Louisiana is a contestant 
in the nationally televised 
Miss America pageant. 



Children will be children, I 
suppose, and be inclined to 
play games. But, should 
games be played with people's 
lives? I make this statement 
in reference to the number of 
false alarms that have taken 
place in Sabine dormitory. 

The first one occurred 
around 11 :30p. m., Saturday a 




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couple of weeks ago. I was 
sitting in my room reading 
some heavy magazine like 
TIME or NEWSWEEK when 
this blaring noise startled me. 
After the R. A. had advised me 
to go down to the lobby, I 
discovered that not one but 
several alarms had been 
triggered in different 
locations throughout the four 
wings. 

A thorough inspection of the 
dormitory by University Poli- 
ce indicated the presence of no 
fire; the alarms were turned 
off and everyone returned to 
their rooms, hoping the event 
would not be repeated later 
that night. 

All remained quiet in the 
dorm until 6 p. m. Friday a 
week ago. The alarm went off 
and an all-call was given 
telling residents to proceed 
down the stairs and out of the 
buildings. Girls, hurriedly 
throwing on clothes, myself 
included, rushed down the 
stairs and outside. Everyone 
believed a fire drill was being 
conducted. I learned quickly 
that this was not the case. 
Instead, someone had once 
again triggered the fire 
alarm. A quick search was 
made and we were allowed to 
return to our rooms and peace 
we thought. 

Were we wrong! Not more 
than five minutes after I had 



returned to my room the 
alarm blared again. Being 
very tired and disgusted, I 
simply stuck my head out the 
door and watched the reac- 
tions of my neighbors. 

They were angered and 
disgusted. No one made a 
move to evacuate the floor. 
Within three minutes the 
alarm was disengaged. 

It was triggered a third 
time, shortly thereafter. 
Obscenities began to fill the 
hallway as we waited once 
more for the alarm to be 
silenced. 

I don't know if the 
pranksters realize that they 
could be held responsible for 
any injuries or deaths that 
may occur if a fire should 
break out in Sabine. Many of 
the residents have stated that 
should they hear the fire 
alarm go off they probably 
would figure it to be a false 
alarm and continue on with 
their activities. 

This attitude is dangerous 
and it is a shame that many of 
the residents seem to agree 
with it. 

What's fun should be fun for 
all. What is dangerous to ot- 
hers demonstrates a definite 
attitude of irresponsibility. 

Would you want it on your 
conscience that you may have 
been the cause of someone's 




death because you 
thoughtless and 
considerate? 



TAIL — Northwestern State 
University students often grab 
"matters" by the tail during 
registration and sometimes during 



immediately find 





HOW DOES IT FEEL, 
CHIEF? — Welcome 
back to a new stadium 
and an explosive team. 



GOODBYE CRUEL 
WORLD! - How many 
times have you felt like 
crawling into some 
forsaken hole and 
passing into oblivion? 
This person seems to 
have found the right 
spot for his departure 
from this world. One 
can only wonder if he 
found the Deace and 
tranquility he sought. 



Dear Editor, 

What has happened to 
maintenance here at Nor- 
thwestern? Why is it that 
Natchitoches Hall can not get 



Ka 

amma 
wes 
one tc 
ppa Ai 
lester w 
k featu 
ies. Th 
pledge 
r. The: 
Aaron, 
I 

geois, 
Bran 
y Ch 
y Dur 
yomnd 
rville, 
irnas K 
iard 
dock, ] 
nudt, 

not confronting the "matter" heai ,yl ° r ' ^ 

on can prove quite messy . Or whan boinas ' J( 

there to tell but a fistful of 'tail ' J ryl0gne ; 

no more, no less. ^ Wel ^ 

avid Yarl 

The KA 

ongratula) 

Jathier, M 

jndsey Tc 

larried di 

lie Order i 

te reaffili 

lobert ! 

impson ai 

practice 

itramural 

Sob Anglin 

le squad 

itry strong 

Team 

Saturdi 

home 

pres 

Its will 

Went Sai 

The chi 

■Jama 

taerican I 

ns provid 

Everyone 

be, 

E 

TtieEpsi] 
Zeta 



Readers 
Comment 



dents have to continue 
suffer when they have been 
without air conditioners all 
semester, but they have paid 
for an air conditioned room? 



SGA at a glance 



The SGA Treasurer is required by the SGA Constitution to 
file at the beginning of each school year an estimated budget 
of revenue and expense. 

At the present time the records on the Comptroller's office 
show that the unencumbered balance of $2,684.43 and with 
expected revenues and expenses for the summer, fall, and 
spring semester to be accumulated throughout the semester 
by their respected committees. The budget for the school 
year stands as follows: 

Revenues and Expenses of the SGA 
School Year 1976-77 

REVENUE: 

Beginning balance $ 2,684.43 

Loan (KNWD) 750.00 
Summer 3,000.00 
Fall 10,000.00 
Spring 9,000.00 



State Fair 
Legal Aid 
Upstart 



450.00 



197.03 



Ff. 



$12,447.03 



TOTAL ESTIMATED EXPENSES 
CONTINGENCY 



$23,434.43 
2,000.00 



The Contingency that remains is required by the SGA 
Constitution to be kept as an emergency fund or in the event 
of some unexpected expenses. 

Overall, I view the SGA to be in very stable condition 
financially. Total credit for this situation should be given to 
the previous SGA Treasurer, Clinton Davis. 

Respectfully submitted 
Terry Downs 
SGA Treasurer 



$25,434.43 



GENERAL EXPENSES: 

Scholarships 8,987.40 

Office Operations 1,650.00 

Louisiana Student Lobby 350.00 
Committee Operations: 

Cheerleaders 500.00 
School Spirit 700.00 
Speaker Series 9000.00 
Student Ser. 1600.00 



The Senate of Northwestern 
met on September 18, 1976. 
The meeting was called to 
order at 6:40 p. m. by Bob 
Ryder. Absent were Mc- 
Cormick, Raines, Dreher, 
Ball- 

Downs reported on the 
yearly budget. Lynch sum- 
marized SUGB projects; 
Martin reported that voting 




photo sippliis 



^Shutter Shop & Caller 



FILM DEVELOPING COUPON 

OFFERING CAMERA STORE QUALITY AT DISCOUNT PRICES 

(K0DAC0L0R 110-126-135 ROLLS DEVELOPED & PRINTED ) 



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J 5.90 
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machines would be used in 
Senator elections this month. 
NEW BUSINESS 

Ryder discussed Resolution 
No. 5 which states "... The- 
refore be it resolved that the 
Student Government 
Association of Northwestern 
State University of Louisiana 
does urge and request the 
Natchitoches City Council to 
vote to allow beer on the 
campus of Northwestern." 
Ryder moved to accept 
resolution, Lynch seconded. 
Resolution passed with four 
abstentions. 

Nugent moved to adjourn, 
V. Davis seconded. Meeting 
adjourned at 7:10 p. m. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Debbie Page 
Senate Clerk 



burned out light bulbs And finally, why can't Nat- 
replaced in their parking lot? chitoches Hall residents get 
The lights have been out for their main walkway fixed! 
four or five months. Doesn't Maintenance came and dug up 
the administration realize that the cement slab and now son* 
the burned out lights en- nine or so months later, the 
courage vandalism in the cement portion still hasn't 
parking lot? Don't they realize been repaired 



that our girls are afraid to get What has happened t» 
out of their cars late at night maintenance? Have they 
because they can't see who is decided to do the jobs that 
in the parking lot. they want to do neglecting 

There are two sofas in the more important ones? And 
Lobby of Natchitoches Hall now I leave you with these 
waiting to be repaired. They unanswered questions. Wil 
have been there for over a someone please respond? 
week. Why can't we get them Natchitoches Resident 
fixed, and why do our resi- Name withheld by request 



Is* 
o 



-24 HOUR SERVICE- 

ONE SUPER SAVINGS COUPON MUST ACCOMPANY 
EACH ROLL OF FILM- COUPON EXPIRES OCT. 1, 1976 

aura 



Across From NSU Library Phone 352-9975 



DISCOUNT 
PRINTING 

IBM Bond Copier 

Phone 352-6466 
132 St. Denis St. 



Current Sauce 



COLETTE OLDMIXON 

Editor 



BOB RYDER 

Managing Editor 

BILL BOSSIER 

Sports Editor 

PAULA JETTON 

News Editor 

EDITH M. HARRIS 

Assistant News Editor 

OLU AKINRINADE 

Assistant News Editor 



by Ol 
The hand 
Ned doe 
Bar, King 
toeatNS 
•chool wall 
traffiti, 
Pastime. 
Pastime' 
Km call it 
test rooms 
The wa 
Doms all 
*itnessed 
. fespite eff 
dean . Tl 
Cached su 
*ere is s< 
r °om thi 
beared \ 
terns, r 
^ecalli 
kalth hint 
^guage. 
A few 
Musical m 
Serstar' 
J* natior 
time J 
is uperstai 
Nk in the 
* "Jesui 
•tttten on 
h the i 

RODNEY WISE Galas' al 

Circulation Manager aby> ^ 
I 1 Anotht 

MIKERABALAIS J* loves; 

Photographer 



MARK SMITH 

Advertising Manager 

MARK BANDY 

Business Manager 



p oliutio 



FRANKLIN I. PRESSOR 

Adviser 



NorKtern ^Vm ° ,fiCia ' Publication of the student bodvjj 
newspa?e isen,e ' d ^"' VerS ' ,y in Natchitoches. Louisiana. 
Off ice P under %™ « »" Natchi.oc.es P* 

™^"& e T y Tuesdayduring thefall and**"* 
weekly dur^no th»t excep,l0n of holidays and testing periods and 

Editorial offices »™ , Na . ,ch,foches ' Louisiana. reSt 

Bu,,d,ng and'ee^on:s a^e 3 e , d 7^. R ° 0m " 5 ' AMS a " d Sd 
Opinions exorp«T 357-5456 and 357 6874, Business. Itjt 

student Mit" s .nrt^ ,n . ed,torial columns are "lely mose °'. S 
adrnTnist^a ° n,ra cu d ,° v n °s,^ CeSSarHy represent ,he viewpoint of 
Letters to the editor Ire „ i °I 5,udent bodv of Northwestern- 
students, faculty and staf? ^'^ut.ons are solicited f$ 
must be signed ann ™ and ,rom 5, ^ent organizations. Let'"; 

The staff of Current L Wlth he| d upon request. (0 f 

*. of ^W*^^ b Mff t0 *" a " ' e,,e 



ie are 
£ fight a 

P* studei 



^ctrolo 
"one ■ 



September 21, 1976 CURRENT SAUCE Page 3 



3/ TTK* 



4 Z1>B 





Kappa Alpha 
Gamma Psi Chapter of 
Uthwestern welcomes 
Lryone to the fall semester. 
|ppa Alpha began the 
Lester with a fantastic rush 
«ek featuring a variety of 
tties. Thirty-two men took 
je pledge of Kappa Alpha 
Ler. These new pledges are 
U Aaron, Derick Anderson, 
fcky Berry, Tommy 
krgeois, Robert Bradley, 
try Branton, Rodney Briut, 
knmy Childers, Bill Corry, 
Wry Durio, Keith Foster, 
Lyomnd Gardner, Mike 
Irville, Bill Jackson, 
tomas Killen, Jeff Lyons, 
jchard McCrory, Alan 
Lrdock, Bo Roberts, Eric 
rtunudt. Billy Shoe, Greg 
3 Iv find tl I 1 * 11 " 10 ' chuck Smith, Mark 
flatter" hS ,ylo^, Dennis Terry ' Robin 
sv Or what' , "" nas ' Johnny Toria ' Leon 
Jl of "tail'' tt i0 B ne ' Barne y Walker, 
- (Btt Wells, Tom Wells, and 
tvid Yarborough. 
The KA's would like to 
ongratulate brothers Steve 
(athier, Mike Rabalais, and 
'jndsey Torbett as all were 
jarried during the summer. 
He Order is glad to announce 
be reaffiliation of brothers 
[obert Hanson, Kenny 
impson and Steve Mathier. 
practice for the upcoming 
iramural football season, 
lob Anglin will be coaching 
lie squad which has looked 
lery strong. The Kappa Alpha 
Team took on the faculty 
Saturday morning of the 
BU home opener. Due to the 
irly press deadline the 
wilts will follow in the next 
Hurrent Sauce. 

The chapter hosted a 
Pa jama party" at the 
taerican Legion Hall. Music 
ras provided by Seaux and 
Everyone has a fantastic 
p. 

Delta Zeta 

The Epsilon Beta Chapter of 
Zeta had a very sue- 



Greek Review - 




:o continue 
hey have been 
:onditi oners all 
they have paid 
ditioned room? 
vhy can't Nat- 
I residents get 
alkway fixed! 
ame and dug up 
b and now sow 
nths later, the 
n still hasn't 



cessful rusb week, pledging 
their quota of 22. We would 
like to welcome all of our new 
pledges to the sisterhood of 
Delta Zeta. 

Pam Simpson, pledge 
trainer, initiated a new 
program calle "Rose Bud- 
dies". The purpose of this 
program is to help th actives 
and the new pledges become 
better acquainted before "Big 
Sisters" are assigned. 

New chairman are as 
follows: Gwen Gatti— social 
chairman; Karen LeJeune— 
courtesy chairman; Julie 
Renkin— Activities chairman; 
Anne Manson— assistant 
activities chairman; and 
Jackie Phill ips— money 
makiing chairman. Nancy 
Chaumont is our new treasure 
Gwen Gatti and Nancy 
Chaumont attended a concert 
sponsored by Tech in Ruston 
to listen to different bands to 
be considered for the spring 
formal. 

A chapter exchange with 
Kappa Alpha fraternity was 
held Sept. 14 at the KA house. 
We are all looking forward to 
the chapter exchange with the 
Kappa Sigmas planned for- 
Thursday night, Sept. 23. 

Everyone had fun at the 
slumber party held Friday, 
night, Sept. 17 at the Delta 
Zeta house. We are taking part 
in intramural football and our 
coach is Scotty Wise. 

We want to congratulate 
everyone on a great rush and 
hope you have a nice 
semester. 

PhiMu 

During the first week of 
classes the Phi Mu's had a 
chapter exchange with the 
brothers of Kappa Sigma. 

The officers for the 1976 fall 
pledge class are president- 
Kay Tuminello; vice 
president— Robin McDonald; 
secretary— Liz Dyer; 



treasurer— Janice Hargis; 
Vickie Smith; and song 
leaders— Pam Neck and 
Robin Rose. 

Phi Mu's flag footbal 1 team 
has been hard at work pre- 
paring for the intramural 
football season. We would like 
to thank "Coach" John 
Russell for all his time and 
effort in working with the 
team and wish the team the 
best of luck this year. 

On Wednesday and Thur- 
sday of last week, all the Phi 
Mu's got together and en- 
tertained classes at Parks and 
Northwestern Elementary 
Schools with songs. We were 
accompanied by the famous s 
"Phi Mu Washboard Band." 
All thechildren received 
lif esaver dolls that were made 
during a fall rush party. This 
was one of our service 
projects in the community. 
Sigma Sigma Sigma 

The Alpha Zeta Chapter of 
Sigma Sigma Sigma is happy 
to be back at Northwestern 
and proudly announces their 
new fall pledge class. 

Those pledged on Sunday, 
Sept. 5 were Vickie Adams, 
Pam Buxton, Kim Cole, Edna 
Davis, Kathy Gresham, 
Theresa Hebert, Susan Heintz, 
Catherine Holland, Vickie 
Kitchin, Tracey Lloyd, Debra 
McHalffey, Beth Morrow, 
Melaney Mydland, Tammy 
Premeaux, Gwen Smith, 
Karen Thermon, Debbie 
Villard, Lynn Waller, Tammy 
Ludoux, and Cindy Sheets. 

Prior to the pledging 
ceremonies, the chapter at- 
tended service at the First 
United Methodist Church and 
afterwards enjoyed a 
spaghetti dinner prepared by 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence 
Kilman. 

The 1976 Pledge class of- 
ficers were recently elected 
and those serving are: 
President— Kim Cole; Vice 



happened to 
Have they 
the jobs that 
do neglecting 
nt ones? And 
ou with these 
uestions. Will 
; respond? 
>s Resident 
Id by request 



Is graffiti here vandalism 
or bathroom literature? 



by Olu Akinrinade 
The handwriting on the wall 
felled doom for Nebuchadne- 
8ar, King of Babylon, but 
kre at NSU, writings on the 
ichool walls, otherwise called 
ifaffiti, have become a 
Pastime. 

Pastime? What else would 
m call it? Pastime! In the 
"st rooms? 

The walls in the men's 
toms all over campus have 
witnessed incessant abuses 
kspite efforts to keep them 
c 'ean. The abuses have 
Cached such proportions that 
"tere is scarcely any men's 
[XCC torn that isn't already 
•Beared with love and hate 
!°erns, racial jokes and 
*mecalling, philosophies, 
Wtb hints and plain vulgar 
*guage. 

A few years ago, the 
Musical movie "Jesus Christ 
'"Perstar" was a hit across 
* nation. However, since 
time Jesus has gone from 
"*>perstar to a heavy dude. A 
** in the Fine Arts building 
** "Jesus is a heavy dude," 
•titten on it. 

to the same room, Telly 
Galas' album ' 'Who loves ya 
n Manager »by» aeems to ^ catc hing 

I 1 Another desk has "Smile 
J°d loves ya baby" written on 

pollution ! Well, many 
f^Ple are now spearheading 
"/ fight against pollution so 
e can breath clean air. But 
e student who doesn't see 
V hopes for the future wrote 
^ of the universe has 
krmined that life is 
lerous to your sanity." 
t does he want us to do? 
^ji interesting aspect of the 

"^Wanted he 

legs & face 
E M0VED... quickly and 
/^anently by a Registered 
'•ctrologist. 



SMITH 

g Manager 

BANDY 

Manager 

Y WISE 



HBALAIS 

rapher 

I. PRESSON 

iser 

.tudent body 
Louisiana. ( 
itchitoches 

sfallandspjg 
periods arf 



many compositions on the 
walls is the tendency of many 
students to show-off their lack 
of the command of English 
language. 

"Newton was wrong, there 
is not gravity," writes one 
student. 

Odd as it may seem, graffiti 
on campus has a strange twist 
to it. For instance, one student 
who got sick of reading sen- 
tences on walls and desks 
wrote "Don't write on this 
desk." The command didn't 
go unnoticed for another 
student wrote "But you have 
already written on it your- 
self." 

Love for NSU does not come 
through in many of the sen- 
tences written on the walls of 
the men's restrooms. "NSU is 
a crip school" wrote one 
student. Another wrote "NSU 
snuffs enough for the whole 
world," but a question popped 
up "Why are you going here?" 

Rivalry between Louisiana 
Tech and NSU seems a little 
deeper than is often por- 
trayed. If students think it is 
only football rivalry they are 
mistaken. Tech diplomas 
seem to be cheap articles, at 
least in the men's rooms. The 
box of toilet tissues in the 
restrooms have been labelled 
"Tech Diplomas, take one." 

But those who love La. Tech 
shouldn't be annoyed. There is 
some friendly advice that they 
can use. For smokers, one 
writer advises "Don't throw 



matches in the commode, 
these crabs can pole vault." 

Campaign against veneral 
diseases has gone into the 
restrooms too. One writer 
says "Stamp out V. D., watch 
your partners." 

There also appears to be 
some affection left among 
NSU students for former 
President Richard Nixon. 
There is a campaign going on 
in the men's rooms to get him 
into the lime-light again. Most 
of the signs for him read "Re- 
elect Richard Nixon." 

Why do students write on the 
walls. Randy Carter, news di- 
rector for KNWD, said graffiti 
serves as self expression for 
neglected children who have 
no other ways to express 
themselves. Another answer 
is given by one student who 
writes "Man's ambition must 
be small to write his name on 
the — house walls — you 
ought to know." 

Are ladies' restroom clean? 
Beg your pardon, ladies, the 
writer of this article couldn't 
go inside the ladies' restroo- 
ms. They are strictly out-of- 
bounds and off-limits for men. 
But if the ERA is finally 
ratified, we may start having 
joint, non-discriminatory 
restrooms in the colleges. 

What is graffiti on campus 
to be called? Vandalism? 
Bathroom pasttime? Or 
Restroom literature? Take 
your pick "but please stay 
seated until the performance 
is over." What? ... Exeunt. 



ie Nate 



hitoc" 



and Scien' 
usiness. 
ly those o_» i(|l< 



tot ' 



newpoin 
rthwestern- 
b solicited'/. 



of* 

s L J!?3 

considered 
t all letters' 



G. J." 
nj on, 1013 Parkway Drive, 
By ap 



352-4983. 
lament on lv! 



BAKER'S 

We Seldom Say No! 

THE OFFICE PEOPLE 
IN NATCHITOCHES 

Phone NSU Hot-Line 352-6466 



Presiden —Debra McHalffey; 
Secretary— Melaney 
Mydland; Treasurer— Susan 
Heintz. 

The girls have started their 
intramural activities by 
capturing first place inthe 
punt, pass, and kick event. 
Those participating were: 
Nita Hughens, Kathy Maggio, 
Tammy Ludoux Tammy 
Premeaux, and Angie Hebert. 

A special thanks goes to Liz 
Trudel who made our new Tri- 
Sigma spirit flag. Thanks Liz! 

Sigma Kappa 

Sigma Kappa is proud to 
announce the pledging of 19 
new members. They are: 
Claudia Blanchard, Lisa 
Babo, Julie Brazea Melissa 
Canik, Donelle Dupree, 
Debbie Fitch, Dawn Graham 
Deanie Lanclose, Sally Mann, 
Katie Moore, Debra Plunkett, 
Mary Rogers, Marie Russo, 
Gwen Teekell, Mandy Turtle, 
Lee Williams, Becky Wood, 
Nannette Hawthorne, and 
Zonnie Zaggar. A skating 
party was held Sunday, Sept. 
12, to reveal the identiti of 
Heart Sisters: Sunshines of 
the Week for the past two 
weeks are Janet Dasko and 
Michele Champagne, 
respectively. Pledges of the 
week have been Brenda 
Hoffpauir and Kattie Moore. 

A Gerontology program was 
held Monday, Sept. 20 at the 
local nursinghome. 

Congratulations to Betty 
Williams for being selected as 
this year's Director of the 
Lady of the Bracelet Beauty 
Pageant Keep up the good 
work Betty.l 

Sigma Tau Gamma 
Brothers of Sigma Tau 
Gamma had an Active-Pledge 
exchang with Sigma Sigma 
Sigma sorority sisters 
Tuesday night. The exchange 



was a real success. The ex- 
change was held at White 
Columns club house. Sig Taus 
plan other exchanges with all 
the other sororities in the 
future. 

After the game Saturday 
night, the Sig Tau Brothers 
from Stephen F. Austin were 
honored with a party. 

Sig Tau wishes the football 
team the best of luck as each 
brother will be there to boost 
the spirits. 




DON'T DROP ME — 
Many a time Nor- 
thwestern students 
leave their fate in the 
hands of their fellow 
students. These girls 
here, members of the 
Delta Zeta sorority, 
seem to be having fun. 
But wait! Somebody is 
on the verge of being 
dropped. Was she or 
wasn't she? 




GO! DEMONS! - NSU cheerleaders provide a lot 
of acrobatic shows to raise the spirits of the fans 
as can be seen in this picture. Marv Lvn Bartek 
seems skeptical of how long this particular stunt 
will hold up. 



SANDEFUR 
JEWELERS 

DISCOUNT PRICES 
FOR 

QUALITY JEWELRY 

624 FRONT STREET 
PHONE 352-6390 




KAPPA SIGMA - Pictured here are 
members of the 1976 tall semester 
pledge class of the Kappa Sigma. 
The officers are: (seated 1. to r. ) 
Mark Matthews, guard; Mark 



Cotrell. vice-president; Stan Tyltsr, 
president; Mark Manuel, secretary; 
and Larry Hall, treasurer. Kappa 
Sigma pledged 29 young men to th«r 
fraternity this fall. 



External Affairs to provide 
Public Relations Jobs 



The office of External Af- 
fairs is looking for students to 
work with their Public 
Relations Program. 

Students who work with the 
program would be in- 
strumental in student 
recruitment for Nor- 
thwestern. According to 
Debbie Hebert, graduate 
assistant in charge of the 
program, "Students who 
become involved in this 
program would help sell 
Northwestern to high school 
students." 

Some of the various ac- 
tivities which are in the 
program include travelling to 
high schools, hosting groups of 
high school students who visit 
the NSU campus, conducting 
tours of the campus, and like 
projects which would promote 
NSU. 

Schools outside of the 
regular tour of recruitment 



which will be visited this 
semester are Chalmette High 
School in conjunction with 
Andrew Jackson High School, 
Archbish op Rummel, Brother 
Martin High School in con- 
junction with St. James Major 
High School, and St. Joseph 
Academy, St. Louis High 
School in Lake Charles, St. 
Joseph Academy and Glen 
Oaks High School in Baton 
Rouge, Zachary High School 
and Bogalousas High School. 

St. Scholastic High School 
Covington; Tara High School, 
Baton Rouge; H. L. Bourgeois 
High School, Gray; Urseline 
Academy, New Orleans and 
Menard High School, 
Alexandria have been added 
to the tour. 

Any graduate of the 
aforementioned high schools 
who may have some helpful 
suggestions or information 
which would aid the Public 
Relations Program when they 
visit the schools is encouraged 



to stop by Room 114 in Cald- 
well Hall or call 4414. 

Any student interested in 
becoming part of the Public 
Relations Program should fill 
out an application which can 
be obtained in the Office of 
External Affairs Room .114, 
Caldwell Hall. 

The first orientation 
meeting for this program will 
be held Monday, Sept. 27 at 3 
p. m. in the Office of External 
Affairs. 



Phi Beta Lambda will hold 
an informal meeting Thur 
sday, Sept. 23 at 4 p.m. jn 
Room 107 of the Business 
Administration Bldg. Anyone 
majoring or minoring in any 
field offered by the College of 
Business is asked to attend 

A formal meeting of the 
organization will be held at 5 
p.m. the same day, inthe same 
dace. 



Demon 
Fight Song 




Go Demons take the field, 
Northwestern Demons nevei 
yield, 

Fight Demons win tonight, 
Victory is on our side. 
Purple & White shall ever 
reign," Filling the air with 
battle strains, 
So Demons for ever stand & 
Fight for dear old Demon 
Land! 




How much change does 
our American Economic 
System need: A lot? 
A little? None? 

The more we all know abou 
our system and how ll works 
the better we can decide 
what to preserve, what to 
change in the years 
ahead. That's why this 
special booklet has been 
prepared. Every Ame'ri- 
■ can ought to know what 
it says. For a free copy, 
write: "Economics',' 
Pueblo. Colorado 81009 
The American 
Economic 
System. 

& m 

">xjr.*J jf.1 J Z Z*wr.S-s !'Stw*t - 

AMERICAN ECONOMIC SYSTEM CAMPAIGN 
NEWSPAPER AD MAT NO. AES-76-636 [3V 2 " x 3V4"] 




BUNKER CLUB PRESENTS 
TOP ENTERTAINMENT 

DELTA QUEEN THURSDAY SEPT. 23 
EARTH SATURDAY SEPT. 25 

FEATURING BILLY PENDLETON (AFTER NSU GAME) 

FAT CHANGE THURSDAY SEPT. 30 

★ ATTENTION MONDAY NIGHT "FOOTBALL SPECIAL" 
WEEKNIGHTS DANCE TO OUR DISCO SOUNDS 

PLAY OUR NEW MACHINES: F00SBALL PIN BALL 

QUADRAP0NG 

HWY. 1 SOUTH BYPASS PHONE 352-6026 



Page 4 CURRENT SAUCE September 21. 1976 



Welcome back Chief Caddo ; 
Demons blast Lumberjacks, 47-0 



\tu 
ha 



Chief Caddo returned to 
NSU Saturday night and 
evidently liked his new 
surroundings, because he will 
be staying for at least another 
year. 

•While Chief Caddo watched 
from the north end zone of 
Turpin Stadium, the Nor- 
thwestern Demons ran away 
with a convincing 47-0 victory 
over the Stephen F. Austin 
Lumberjacks. The victory 
over the Lumberjacks from 
Nagodoches, Texas broke a 
nine game losing streak of the 
Demons, and it was the first 
victory at home since they 
defeated Southeastern 40-3 in 
the last game of the 1974 
Season. 

It was the first shut-out the 
Demons have earned since the 
Wanked defending NAIA 
champion East Texas State 24- 
O'in the 1973 season opener. 
-Sidney "Thundering Bull" 
Thornton tied two NSU 
football records in Saturday 
night's game against the 
'Jacks. Those records tied by 
me "Bull" were most touch- 
downs scored rushing (4) and 
most touchdowns scored in 
one game (4). Those records 
were set by Mari o Cage in his 
brilliant career at NSU. 

Thornton only played the 
first half of the game, but 
when he was in, the Lum- 
berjacks knew it. He carried 
the ball ten times for 92 yards 
and scored four touchdowns. 
The "Bull" scored on runs of 
15, four, 10, and one yard, 
breaking several tackles 
enroute to the goal line. 
« It was certainly a good way 
to start off the season at home, 
and even a better way to break 
in Harry Turpin Stadium to 
:Northwestern football. The 
new astro-turfed surface 
didn't appear to bother the 
.Demons at all as the crowd of 



9000 cheered the Demons back 
on to a winning track. 

NSU didn't waste any time 
showing what their many 
followers wanted to see. They 
took the opening kickoff and 
moved the ball right through 
the Lumberjack defense. With 
several brilliant runs by Brett 
Knecht and the sharp passing 
of Stuart Wright, the Demons 
showed that they were not to 
be denied. With a third down 
and eleven yards to go at the 
SFA 15, Sidney Thornton took 
a pitch from Wright and 
blasted 15 yards for the first 
Demon score. Dennis Pen- 
dergraft converted on the 
PAT, making the score 7-0, 
Demons. 

The Demon defense showed 
again that they can contain 
the opponent's offense. Last 
week against Lamar, the 
Demon defense gave up only 
147 total yards to the Car- 
dinals in a losing effort This 
week against the 'Jacks, the 
defense gave up only 176 yards 
in total offense, 105 of which 
was in the air. The Demon 
defense was led by Don Smith 
with 10 tackles, Bobby Kir- 
choff with seven, U. L. 
Finister and Jerry Edwards 
with six, and Carl Broom, 
Tommy Braden, Spencer 
Burroughs, and Ben Loper 
with five each. 

The Demons second score 
came in the first quarter when 
a Dennis Pendergraft punt 
was fumbled and Mark 
Schroeder recovered for the 
Demons on the SFA 4. On first 
and 4, Wright handed off to 
Thornton, who bulled his way 
for the four yards and the six 
points. The PAT was no good, 
making the score 13-0, NSU. 

A Willie B. Mosley in- 
terception set up the third 
Demon score. Mosely in- 
tercepted the ball at his own 



49, and returned it 20 yards to 
the SFA 31. Wright scrambled 
to the 22, and on the next play 
fired what appeared to be a 
touchdown pass to Brett 
Knecht. The TD was called 
back because of a procedure 
penalty against the Demons. A 
couple of runs by Haring and 
Thornton put the ball on the 10, 
and on third and two, Thorn- 
ton twisted and turned his way 
into the end zone for his third 
touchdown of the evening. 

Tremendous blocking and 
powerful running by Thronton 
set up the fourth Demon score. 
Thornton took a pitch from 
Wright on the left side, and 
raced 47 yards down to the 
SFA 3 yard line. Blocking by 
his effensive line cleared the 
left side of the field for 
Thornton, but he was hauled in 
from behind at the three. Two 
olays later found Thornton in 
the end zone again for his 
fourth TD of the game. 

Last week against Lamar 
when Mark Rhodes came in to 
relieve Stuart Wright, he 
immediately threw an in- 
terception that eventually led 
to a Lamar score. Determined 
not to let that happen again 
this week, Rhodes set up on 
first and ten to throw another 
pass. This one was to 
Wyamond Waters, who was all 
alone for the fifth Demon 
score. 

The Lumberjacks, already 
behind 33-0 in still the second 
quarter, could not get any 
sustained offense against the 
tough Demon defense. The 
'Jacks were forced to punt 
again, and Willie B. Mosely 
dropped back to return it. And 
return it he did Mosely 
gathered in the 40 yard punt or 
his own 31, and raced down the 
east sideline 69 yards for the 
sixth touchdown. At the end of 
the first half, the score was 



NSU 40, SFA 0. 

Things quited down in the 
second half, however. With the 
Demon first team on the 
bench, SFA still couldn't get 
any offense goin::. The big lead 
gave coach A. L. Williams an 
opportunity to freely sub- 
stitute players in order to give 
them valuable game ex- 
perience. "I'm pleased we had 
a chance to play as many 
people as we did. It gave us a 
lot of experience and that's 
what we needed. The first 
group did a great job and the 
second and third stringers did 
a heck of a job" said Coach 
Williams after the game. 

The Demons final score 
came after NSU got 
possession of the ball after an 
SFA attempt for a first down 
fell short. David Wright fired 
a 46 yard pass to Robert 
Hardwell to set up the score. A 
five yard penalty put the ball 
at the 12, but on the next play 
Wright in the end zone to 
Curtis Dorsey for the touch- 
down. Pondergrafl s PAT was 
good, making the score NSU 
47, SFA 0. 

The Demons take on the 
Statesmen from Delta State 
this weekend in Turpin 
Stadium. The Demons hope to 
stay on the winning track 
when they face the Statesmen 
in the in the 7:30 p. m. game 
Saturday night. 



SFA 
0* 




Thinclads begin Season 



...Northwestern State 
University's cross country 
team, a perennial power 
among the state college units, 
will face a rugged seven-meet 
schedule for the 1976 season. 
; The schedule, which lists 
two home meets, was an- 
nounced this week by athletic 
director George Doherty and 
cross country coach Jerry 
byes and was approved by the 
NSU Athletic Council. 

The Demon Harriers, losers 
ol only two meets to Louisiana 
'schools in the past four years, 
"upened their season Saturday, 
Sept. 18 in the Harding College 



Invitational Meet at Searcy, 
Ark., a four-mile test. The 
season will come to a close on 
Nov. 13 in the NCAA District 
Qualifying Meet at Furman, S. 
C. over a six-mile course. 

In between are a four-mile 
three way meet with Cen- 
tenary and Northeast La. in 
Shreveport Sept. 25, the an- 
nual USL Invitational meet 
Oct. 30 in Lafayette over a six- 
mile course and a six-mile 
dual meet in Monroe Nov. 5 
with Northeast. 

The two home meets are 
both dual affairs, the first on 
Oct. 16 against Centenary and 
the other Oct. 22 against 



Northeast. Both will be run 
over the hilly Hickory Ridge 
course, which can vary from 
four to six miles. 

Northwestern, the defen- 
ding NAIA District 30 
champions for four straight 
years, will not be competing in 
NAIA competition this season. 

"We're going to be much 
younger this year," Dyes said, 
"and we'll probably be run- 
ning mostly freshmen. It'll be 
tough to match the records 
we've put together in the past, 
but once we get some ex- 
perience we'll be able to hold 
our own." 




Pigskin Predictions 

Thanks to the Demons and a couple of other Our guests this week are Rory Alexander, 

teams, the percentages picked up a little bit president of Student Union Governing Board, 

this week. I'm glad to see that the Demons and Earl Hebert, president of Kappa Alpha 

can win, but teams like Tulane and our Order on the NSU campus. They both claim 

friends at La. Tech are still wondering what that they will beat me, but I doubt it. 
winning is. 



Percentages to date 
15-29, .5172 
12-29, .4137 
11-29, .3793 
14-29, .4965 



Last weeks totals 
Bossier 

9-15, .60 
Ryder 
6-15, .40 
Keenan 
8-15, .533 
Brown 







8-15, .533 


BOSSIER 


RYDER 


ALEXANDER 


HEBERT 


NSU vs. DELTA ST. 


NSU 14-10 


NSU 17-13 


NSU 17-16 


NSU 20-17 


LSU vs. RICE 


LSU 16-8 


LSU 24-7 


LSU 24-17 


LSU 22-12 


LA. TECH vs. ARK. ST. 


ARK. ST. 35-14 


ARK. ST. 14-13 


ARK. ST. 22-14 


ARK. ST. 36-24 


MCNEESE vs. E. MICH. 


MCNEESE 24-14 


MCNEESE 7-3 


E. MICH. 21-8 


MCNEESE 24-18 


NLU vs. UTA 


NLU 14-7 


NLU 14-10 


NLU 18-10 


UTA 17-16 


TUL vs. BOSTON COL. 


TUL 17-16 


BOST. COL. 24-16 


BOST. COL. 21-17 


TUL 18-16 


N1CH vs. TROY ST. 


NICH 21-13 


NICH 28-14 


TROY ST. 19-18 


NICH 27-20 


GRAM vs. MORGAN ST. 


GRAM 27-17 


GRAM 31-14 


MORGAN ST. 21-9 


GRAM 32-23 


SLU vs. CAMERON (OKIA) 


SLU 28-12 


SLU 17-10 


SLU 17-14 


SLU 28-6 


BALT. vs. DALLAS 


BALT 21-20 


BALT. 17-14 


DALLAS 14-8 


DALLAS 28-27 


N. O. vs. K. C. 


N. O. 21-20 


N. O. 21-20 


N. O. 17-14 


N. O. 23-10 


MINN. vs. DETROIT 


MINN 27-17 


MINN 45-7 


MINN 24-12 


MINN 25-11 


JETS vs. MIAMI 


MIAMI 30-13 


MIAMI 21-10 


JETS 18-10 


MIAMI 33-14 


OAKLAND vs. HOUSTON 


OAKLAND 28-14 


OAKLAND 14-10 


HOUSTON 21-16 


OAKLAND 23-21 



Intramural flag football season begins 



by Bob Rash 

Flag football gets started 
this week with 27 teams signed 
up in three separate divisions 
are the independent, womens 
and the Greek divisions. 
. The games, which will be 
played at 4:30 p.m. and 5:30 
p.m. will all take place on the 
Intramural Field. All Greek 
division teams and women's 
division teams will play on 
Mondays and Wednesdays 
..with the independent division 
-playing on Tuesday and 
.Thursdays. 



This week's schedule of 
games is as follows: Tues., 
Sept. 21, Boys vs BSU on field 
1, Steelers vs Spirit of '76 on 
field 2, both at 4:30. At 5:30, 
the Rangers square off 
against the Rapides Raiders 
on field 1, and Varnado 
takeson the Rapides 
Roughnecks on field 2. 
Wednesday, Sept. 22, at 4:30, 
Tri Sigma tackles Sigma 
Kappa on field 1, Phi Beta 
Signa is playing KA on field 2, 
and TKE plays Kappa Sigma 
on field_3. At 5:30, its Sigma 



Sigma Sigma vs BSU on field 

1, with field 2 being used by 
Sig Tau vs Kappa Sigma. On 
field 3 Tri-Sigma is up against 
Sigma Kappa. 

Thursday, Sept. 23, sees the 
Spirit of '76 vs the Rangers on 
field 1 with the Rapides 
Roughnecks taking on the 
Bows on field 2, both at 4:30. 
At 5:30, on field 1, theRapides 
Raiders take on PEK with the 
BSU meeting Coupon 8 on field 

2. Monday, Sept. 27 on field 1, 
Sigma Kappa Plays Phi Mu 
with Phi Beta Sigma vs TKE 



on field 2, and Kappa Alpha 
meeting Cossau's Bandits on 
field 3, all at 4:30. At 5:30 on 



field 1, the Phi Beta Sigma 
Shadows plays the Hot Dogs, 
on field 2, the Sigma Tau 



Gamma meets Kappa Sigma 
with Tri-Sigma vs Sigma 
Kappa on field 3. 



Lady Demons 
prepare for action? 



****** *******.********.********.*.*******.**** ******* 



* 
* 

♦ DATE MEET 

♦ Sat. Sept. 18 
J Sat. Sept. 25 

♦ Sat. Oct. 16 
*Fri.Ocl. 22 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 
1976 CROSS COUNTRY SCHEDULE 

SITE 

Harding College Invit. Searcy, Ark. 

Centenary, Northeast, NSU Shreveport 
Centenary, NSU Natchitoches 
Northeast, NSU Naichitoches 
USL Invit. Ufaye.te.LA 
NSU.NE Monroe, LA 

NCAA Dist. Meet Furman, S. C. 



LENGTH * 
4 miles * 
4 miles J 

4 miles * 

5 miles 
(i miles 
li miles 
li miles 




TIME 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 
1976 FALL TENNIS SCHEDULE 
OPPONENT 



.Sat. Oct. 30 
jFri. Nov. 5 
♦Sal. Nov. 13 
* 
* 
* 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ DATE 
*Sat.,Sepl.25 
Jsat.,Oct. 2 

♦ Sat., Oct. 9 

♦ Sat., Oct. 16 
*Thurs.-Sat. 
J Oct. 28-30 

♦ Sa;.-Sun. All Day Pierremont Oaks Indoor Shrevepur ■¥ 

** Nov. 20-21 Tournameni # 

♦ * 

♦ * 

♦ Dates for the return matches with Northeast and U. lech ho ve not been finalized. 
%********************** *******»»»»»»»*»**»»*»»»« 



10a.m. 
10 a.m. 
10 a.m. 
10 a.m. 
All Day 

All Day 



McNeese Slate University 
Northeast La. University 
La. Tech University 
McNeese Stale University 
USL Fall Intercollegiate 

Tournament 
Pierremont Oaks Indoor 
Tournameni 



LOCATION 
Natchitoches ^ 
Na chiiocties + 
Na.chi oches + 
Uke Charles * 
Ufave e * 
I 

Shrevep.,r 



The Lady Demons 
volleyball and basketball 
teams prepare for their 
respective seasons, as 
practice for the 1976-77 season 
gets underway. 

Announcement of the 
schedules was made by 
athletic director George 
Doherty and womens coach 
Charlotte Corley, and appro- 
ved by the NSU athletic 
council. 

The Lady Demon volleyball 
team, one of the top two units 
in the state the past two years, 
will play in five matches and 



P R E AM 

the Stud 
e rn State 
ina, grat 
unity of li 
y, desirir 
jur inheren 
prnent, an 
gin and 
al welfa 
tional env 
adopt i 
nstitutior 
NAM 
e of this 
the Sti 
Associat 
irn State 
a. 

AUTHORI 
RESPONS 

authorit 
jot Govern 
,titution s 
or reti 
»ugh pi 
jfically en 
Constitutioi 
defined 
ion sha 
ibility 

ent. 
MEM.BE 

bership 
ition sh; 
utive, leg 
officers 



ARTICI 
^EGISLATIV 

'ION I: 
I jlative po 
rth west* 
tensity Stu 
t Associat 
ted in a 
ient Senate. 
HON 2: C 
Dbe electee 
us, election 
it each yeai 
ate shall coi 
i elected 1 
finer Stu 
Residents shal 
fimmember! 
WTwoSei 
tiled from 
pduate els 

B, two Sop 

tiors, two Se 
for from 
Ml, elected 1 
trespectiv< 
13. Eleven 
11 be elei 
tubers of th< 
>rge. 

U. The Vi( 
SGA shal] 
membc 
ate to serve 
on Governi 
tided for i 
«m Constitui 
L5. The S 
1 the righ 
— "*knt associa 
fical tasks 
ibers. 
ttlONSiCl 
ate shall 1 
of impi 
'oval. 1 



The NSU squad firuslB r ernmon t 

second in the state last seas* " meiu 
losing only to Tulane in j™ °« 
finals of the state meet. In J from 
1974 season, the Lady Dem» through 

walked away with the st* I removal 
championship. Student 
The Udy Demon basket" Sng for ^ 

squad face a rugged I 9 £ a fl be on 
schedule, featuring n J batton. The 
appearances at home in J i stu dent < 

confines of Pra ^ >U preside 
Coliseum. Three home ga* - 
will be played immedia 1 nviciea 
before the men's games. ' Jrmce 
eluding their season ope" ^embers 1 
Nov. 30 against McN«JJlON4:C 
in five tournaments during the State. The Udy Demons * «te shall be 



TUNE UP UN ANY SIZE HUNUA 

om/9.95 

(PLUS PARTS) 
WITH PRESENTATION OF NSU 1.0. 

HONDA VILLAGE 

367 HWY. 1 SOUTH PHONE 352-8714 



Thousands of Topics 

Send for your up-to-date, 160- 
page, mail order catalog. Enclose 
SI. 00 to cover postage and 
handling. 

RESEARCH ASSISTANCE. INC. 

1 1322 IDAHO AVE., § 206 
LOS ANGELES. CALIF. 90025 
12131 477 8474 

Our research papers are sold for 
research purposes only. 



1976 season. 

Coach Corley's Lady 
Demons, along with graduate 
assistant Jan Nicholls, open 
their season October 1-2 by 
participating in the Nicholls 
State Tournament in 
Thibodaux. On October 4, the 
volleyballers return home for 
their first home match against 
Northeast La. at 7 p. m. in the 
Health and P. E. Majors 
building. 

Other home matches are 
scheduled for October 11 
against Southwestern La., 
beginning at 6 p. m., and the 
annual Northwestern Tour- 
nament on Oct. 29-30. The 
Udy Demons will also part- 
icipate in tournaments at 
Houston and Memphis State 
before the AIAW cham- 
pionships on November 12-13. 



face the McNeese team a^ tti 0n re tm 
Lake Charles on Dec- con( j u 



'oissione 
the q 

foi 



Two other meetings that „ 
be played before the & ! 0{ 
games are with Nicholls 
on Dec. 14 and against L* . 
Univ. on Jan. 15. m e -Ike., .. 
Demons also play homej j* Electio, 
home games with 1 ( ^ Tw 
Louisiana Tech, Lou*'* J«ute a 
College, Southwestern Jte*. 
LSU, Stephen F. Austin- i. 3 T1 
Northeast U. jiT^ized t 

Also on the schedule^ Q 

single games with ° u % *arnannei 
Baptist in Arkadelphia- ^ 
Jan. 28 and the Hm es o{ t 



on 



game against Nicholls Sl 
The Lady Demons cow 

Reg' ", 



an 18-17 record in 
finished third in 



AIAW Tournament 
involving teams fr° in 
states. 



ad' 1 "ate) 



WML** : 



4. The 
termin 
^dings 
and 
ce of tv 
expe 
ed by t 



September 21. 1976 CTHKEXT SAt'CEPagf 5 



Student Government Association announces 
hanges in constitution/ Elections Oct. 5 



A 

0° 



!es to date 

72 
7 
3 
5 




MM 



EBERT 

1- 17 

2- 12 

ST. 36-24 
:ESE 24-18 
.7-16 
8-16 
27-20 
32-23 
8-6 



PREAMBLE 

i the Students of Nor- 
Jtern State University of 
jgna, grateful for the 
jturuty of living in a free 
U, desiring to benefit 
our inherent right of self- 
jBnent, and seeking to 
lain and improve our 
r al welfare in this 
itional environment, do 
adopt and establish 
institution, 
NAME 
e of this organization 
the Student Govern- 
Association of Nor- 
m State University of 
la. 

AUTHORITY AND 
RESPONSIBILITY 

g authority vested in 
it Government by this 
itution shall not be 
or retracted except 
ough procedures 
jfically enumerated in 
Constitution. Only those 
defined in the Con- 
ii shall be the 
ibility of the Student 
irnment. 
MEMBERSHIP 
bership in this 
tion shall include the 
utive, legislative, and 
officers of the student 

ARTICLE I — 
{GISLATIVE BRANCH 

ION I: CI. I. All 
. jlative powers of the 
tthwestern State 
rersity Student Govern- 
it Association shall be 
led in a unicameral 
lent Senate. 

ION 2: CI. I. Members 
[be elected for one year 
os, elections to be held 
s each year. The Student 
ate shall consist of twenty 
| elected members. All 
mer Student Body 
Residents shall serve as ex- 
firamembers of the Senate. 
d. I Two Senators shall be 
feted from each un- 
pduate class: two Fresh- 
k two Sophomores, two 
feors, two Seniors, and one 
itor from the Graduate 
doI, elected by members of 
(respective classes. 
I- 3. Eleven (11) Senators 
fl be elected by the 
ibers of the Student Body 



\S 28-27 
23-10 
25-11 
[ 33-14 
VND 23-21 



ctiot 



I 4. The Vice President of 
SGA shall appoint two 
tag members from the 
ate to serve on the Student 
* Governing Board as 
tided for in the Student 
•n Constitution. 
I 5. The Student Senate 
the right to appoint 
— *ent associates to perform 
"cal tasks for the Senate 
^ Hbers. 

ttlON 3: CI. 1. The Student 
"e shall have the sole 
of impeachment and 
Joval. No Student 
tatelastsea^nment Association 
o Tulane in ^ve officer may be 
tate meet. Inll^ed from his office ex- 
he Lady Dem^ ' through impeachment 
the s!>f removal proceedings in 

Student Senate. When 
lemon baskets {or ^ p ur p 0SC) they 

rugged 19 0j be on oath or af- 

tion. The Chief Justice of 



eaturing n H_ 
at home in | 



play hom*j| 
;s with 

ech, I>« ul 
ithwestern 



F. Austin 



md the 



Dec- 



Supreme Court 



Prathe|„ Stud ent - 
home ga" 1 preside - No person shall 
ed* immedia" convicted without the 
len's games, ' '"rrence of two-thirds of 

season ope" ^embers present, 
ainst McNe* CTION4: CI. 1. The Student 
idy Demons * *»te shall be the judge of all 
eese team »i Hon returns from elec- 
les on Dec V 5 S conducted by the 
meetings tha fl ji missioner o{ Elections 

s£ore th< L 1 °f the qualifications of 
thNicholls^jj^ ^ officeSj 

^The ^ a 8 u P° n recommendations 
i" 7 Elections Board. 
f'T 2. Two-thirds shall 
?' a T stit ute a quorum to do 



^•1 



3. The Senate 



is 

prized to compel the 

sche(iU u acf il * dance 01 members in 
with ^ •"a manner and under such 
rkadelphia-,, ^ && provided for m 



Senate 



r u„ii<j St- Jh^es of the Senate. 

SemoSs ^f 4 - I** Student 
■d in 1975' 76 ' V°*termine the rules of its 
i in Re^X^gs (Rules of the 
nament aC P te ) and with the con- 
ams from T^ee of two-thirds of those 
C% expel a member as 
^ed by the rules. 



SECTION 5: a. 1. The Student 
Senate shall make university 
wide student rules and 
regulations, appropriate all 
revenues of Student Govern- 
ment, confirm or deny by 
majority such nominations as 
the Student Body President 
shall from time to time be 
called upon to make, to keep 
informed concerning the 
attitude of the Student Body 
with regard to all problems of 
student interest; provide for 
the general welfare of the 
student body, and make 
recommendations to the 
Student President, to consider 
and take a action upon all 
matters referred to it by the 
University Administration. 
SECTION 6: CI. 1. No Student 
Senator shall serve simultane- 
ously in any executive or 
judicial office of the Student 
Government Association of 
Northwestern State 
University. 

SECTION 7: Q. 1. Every bill 
which shall have passed the 
Student Senate shall, before it 
be enacted, be presented to 
the Student Body President. If 
he approves he shall sign it, 
but if not he shall return it 
with his objections to the 
Student Senate for recon- 
sideration. If after such 
reconsideration two-thirds of 
the Senate present and voting 
shall agree to pass the bill, it 
shall be passed. If any bill 
shall not be returned by the 
Student Body President within 
seven days after it shall have 
been presented to him, the 
same shall be enacted in like 
manner as if he had signed it. 

CI. 2. Having been enacted 
by the Northwestern State 
University Student Govern- 
ment Association, all acts 
except those specifically 
dealing with the internal 
operation of the Student 
Government Association shall 
be presented to the President 
of the University; if he ap- 
proves he shall sign it, but if 
not he shall return it with his 
objections to the Student 
Senate whereupon the Senate 
shall reserve the right to 
submit the bill to the 
Louisiana State Board of 
Trustees for their approval or 
disapproval. If any bill shall 
not be returned by the 
President of the University 
within ten working days after 
it shall have been passed and 
presented to him, the same 
shall be enacted in like 
manner as if he had signed it. 
ARTICLE II — 
EXECUTIVE BRANCH 
SECTION 1: CL I. The 
executive power of the Nor- 
thwestern State University 
Student Government 
Association shall be vested in 
the Executive Council, which 
is composed of a Student 
President, Student Vice 
President, Executive 
Secretary, Executive 
Treasurer, and a Com- 
missioner of Elections. Each 
shall hold office during the 
term of one year. The 
Presidents of The Association 
of Men Students (AMS), and 
The Association of Women 
Students (AWS) shall serve as 
ex-officio members of the 
Executive Council. 
SECTION 2: CI. 1. A Student 
Body President shall be 
popularly elected by majority 
vote of ballots cast by 
members of the Student Body, 
in an election held for that 
purpose. The Student 
President shall at the time of 
his election and for the term 
be a member of the NSU 
Student Body for at least one 
year. He shall have completed 
at least forty-five (45) 
semester hours ; he shall have 
served on the Student 
Government Association in an 
elective office for a full 
semester. 

SECTION 3: Q. 1. If the office 
of Student Body President 
should become vacant 
because of absence or tem- 
porary disability, the Vice 
President shall act as 
President. If the office of 
Student Body President 
should become vacant 



because of resignation, 
removal, or permanent 
disability, the Vice President 
shall become Student Body 
President. The Chairman of 
the Senate shall succeed the 
Student Body Vice President 
in line of succession. 

CI. 2. Should a vacancy in an 
executive office arise, a 
special election shall be held 
within three weeks of the 
accepted resignation unless 
that office is to be terminated 
within 60 days, in such case 
the office shall be filled by 
appointment. In the meantime 
the president may appoint a 
temporary replacement. 
SECTION 4: CI. 1. The Student 
Body President shall have the 
power, by and with the advice 
and consent of the Student 
Senate, to nominate and ap- 
point all officers and members 
of the Student Government 
Association not otherwise 
provided for herein. 

CI. 2. He shall have the 
power to fill all vacancies in 
the Senate with the approval 
of a majority of the Senate. 

CI. 3. He shall have the 
power to call special meetings 
of the Student Senate when he 
deems such meetings 
necessary, or when requested 
to do so by a majority of the 
total membership of the 
Student Senate or when 
petitioned to do so by a 
minimum of 10 percent of the 
members of the Student Body. 

Q. 4. The Student President 
shall have the power to select 
the student members of all 
boards and committees and 
appoint the chairmen of each, 
with the approval of the 
Student Senate, where such 
chairmen or members are not 
otherwise provided for in this 
Constitution. He shall also 
have the power to remove t- 
hose committee officers and 
members with majority ap- 
proval of the Senate. 

CI. 5. He shall represent the 
Student Body on all official 
occasions and coordinate 
student activities and ser- 
vices. He may address the 
Student Senate, recommend 
for their consideration such 
measures as he shall deem 
necessary and expedient; he 
may convene the Student 
Senate in extraordinary 
session and take care of all 
acts of the Student Senate; he 
is responsible for faithfully 
executing the acts that are 
passed. 

SECTION 5: CI. 1. A Student 
Vice President shall be 
popularly elected by the 
Student Body to serve for a 
term of one year, as provided 
for by this Constitution. He 
shall have completed at least 
45 semester hours of academic 
work, and have served on the 
Student Government 
Association in an elective 
office, for at least one 
semester at the time of filing. 

CL 2. The Student Vice 
President shall succeed the 
Student President as provided 
for in Section 3. He shall serve 
as chairman of the Student 
Services Committee, and he 
shall coordinate all com- 
mittees. 

CI. 3. He shall serve as 
presiding officer of the Senate. 
SECTION 6: CI. 1. A Com- 
missioner of Elections shall be 
elected by the members of the 
Student Body to serve for a 
term of one year, as provided 
for by this Constitution. He 
shall have completed at least 
45 semester hours of academic 
work. 

CI. 2. He shall serve as 
chairman of the Elections 
Board which shall supervise 
all elections conducted by the 
SGA. 

CI. 3. The Commissioner 
shall appoint the member of 
the Elections Board subject to 
approval of the Senate. 
SECTION 7: CI. 1. An 
Executive Secretary shall be 
popularly elected by the 
Student Body to serve a term 
of one year. 

CL 2. The Executive 
Secretary shall be responsible 
for all official correspondence 
and records and shall serve as 



Secretary of the School Spirit 
Committee, and will serve as 
the Senate Clerk. 

CL 3. The Executive 
Secretary shall faithfully 
execute all acts and measures 
delegated to her by the 
Executive Council. 
SECTION 8: CL 1. An 
Executive Treasurer shall be 
popularly elected by the 
Student Body to serve a term 
of one year. He shall have 
completed the first basic 
accounting course with a 
grade of C or better. 

CI. 2. Its shall be the 
responsibility of the Executive 
Treasurer to secure from the 
Business Office of the 
University within one month 
after the beginning of the 
semester a statement of the 
funds available for use by the 
Student Government Assoc- 
iation, to pay out money ap- 
propriated by the Student 
Senate and sign all approved 
requisitions, to transmit 
authorization for expenditures 
authorized by the Student 
Senate, to make a report of the 
Association's financial status 
once each month at the first 
meeting of the Student Senate 
of that month, to provide same 
for publication in the 
CURRENT SAUCE, to pur- 
chase all awards and supplies 
upon being properly 
requisitioned for same, and 
serve as chairman of the 
Budget Committee. Failure to 
perform said duties shall be 
considered malfeasance in 
office. 

SECTION 9: CI. 1. The Student 
Senate shall create such 
organs as shall be necessary 
and proper for the im- 
plementation of the duties and 
powers of the Executive 
Council. 

SECTION 10: CL 1. The 
President of the Student 
Government Association shall 
receive a full-time scholarship 
(a full-time scholarship 
provides a stipend equivalent 
to the total cost of the in- 
firmary fee, dining hall meal 
ticket, rental of any dormitory 
room, registration fee and 
other fees charged at 
registration). The Vice 
President, Commissioner of 
Elections, Secretary and 
Treasurer of the Association 
shall each receive a half-time 
scholarship (a half-time 
scholarship provides a stipend 
equivalent to one-half that of 
the scholarship of the Student 
Body President. 

CI. 2. The scholarships for 
the President, Vice President, 
Commissioner of Elections, 
Secretary, and Treasurer of 
the Association shall be paid 
out of the General Student 
Body funds. The scholarships 
of the CURRENT SAUCE 
staff members shall be paid 
from the funds of the 
CURRENT SAUCE Agency; 
and the scholarships of the 
POTPOURRI staff shall be 
paid from the funds of the 
POTPOURRI agency. These 
scholarships shall be paid at 
such times and in such 
manner as are the other 
student employment positions 
of the University. 

CI. 3. The stipend paid all 
office holders may not be 
changed by vote during the 
one year tenure of each office 
holder. 

SECTION 11: CL 1. No 
jxecutive officer shall 
simultaneously hold office in 
the Student Senate, Student 
Supreme Court, Student Union 
Governing Board, Associated 
Men Students or Associated 
Women Students Executive 
Committees. 

ARTICLE IN- 
JUDICIAL BRANCH 
SECTION 1: Q. 1. All judicial 
powers of the Student 
Government Association shall 
be vested in one Student 
Supreme Court and inferior 
courts of the Associated 
Women Students and 
Associated Men Students, or 
other courts established by the 
Student Senate from time to 
time. 

SECTION 2: CL 1. The 
justices, both of the Supreme 



and inferior courts, shall be 
regularly enrolled students at 
the time of their appointment 
and confirmation. Members of 
the Student Supreme Court 
shall serve one year or until 
they resign or cease to be 
regularly enrolled students at 
Northwestern State 
University or shall be im- 
peached and convicted for 
cause upon a two-thirds vote 
of the Student Senate. 
SECTION 3: CI. 1. The Student 
Supreme Court shall consist of 
seven (7) members. 
SECTION 4: CI. 1. The Student 
Body President shall fill all 
vacancies on the Student 
Supreme Court as they occur, 
with the approval of the 
Student Senate. One justice 
shall be appointed by the 
President as the Chief Justice. 
SECTION 5: CI. 1. The judicial 
power of the Student Supreme 
Court shall extend to all cases 
arising under the Constitution 
and the acts of the Student 
Senate. 

CI. 2. The Court shall have 
original jurisdiction in all 
cases involving controversies 
between organizations and 
students, organizations and 
other organizations, students 
and faculty, students and 
administration, and all cases 
to which Student Government 
shall be a party, if not 
otherwise provided for in the 
Constitution or Code of Con- 
duct. 

CL 3. It shall be the highest 
appellate court in the student 
judicial system and may call 
cases before it on its own 
initiative. 

CI. 4. This Court shall hear 
appeals from the Judicial 
Boards of AWS and AMS. 
SECTION 6: CI. 1. No court 
may render an opinion, hear 
evidence, nor pass judgment 
in the absence of a quorum. 
Quorum for the Student 
Supreme Court shall be 5 
members. 

SECTION 7: CI. 1. The Student 
Supreme Court shall follow 
procedures prescribed in the 
Student Supreme Court 
Procedures and the NSU Code 
of Conduct. 

ARTICLE IV 
SECTION 1: CI. 1. Upon 
petition by ten percent (10 
percent) of the Student Body, 
the Student President shall 
call and preside over a 
general meeting of the Nor- 
thwestern State University 
Student Government 
Association. 

SECTION 2: CL 1. The 
members of the Student Body 
may recall any elected 
representative if the petition 
providing for a recall election 
shall be signed by the number 
of members of the Student 
Body in the affected officers 
constituence equal to five (5) 
percent and provided that the 

question "Shall ■ 

be retained as a 

- officer of the SGA," shall 
receive a two-thirds (2 3) 
majority of the nay votes cast. 

SECTION 3: CI. 1. Any bill 
being considered for passage 
by the Student Senate may, by 
a majority vote of the Senate, 
be referred to the members of 
the Student Body for their 
approval. In such case the 
Student Senate shall provide 
for the publication of such bill 
in CURRENT SAUCE three 
consecutive issues prior to 
such election. For such bill to 
be enacted it must receive a 
two-thirds majority of the 
votes cast. Balloting on such 
bill shall take place at such 
time and in such manner as 
provided by the Student 
Senate, and the results of such 
an election shall be binding 
upon the Student Senate. 
ARTICLE V — 
ELECTIONS 
SECTION 1: CI. 1. Every 
officer of the SGA shall have, 
at the time of filing for office, 
and at the time of 
inauguration an over-all "C" 
average as certified by the 
Registrar. Any SGA officer or 
appointee, including 
cheerleaders, judges and 
editors and staff members of 



publications, shall be 
automatically disqualified 
from holding office at the end 
of any semester in which his 
over-all scholastic average 
falls below this minimum 
requirement. 

CL 2. All candidates for 
election to the Student Senate 
or the Executive Council of the 
Student Government must be 
eligible to serve two full 
semesters. 

CL 3. Term of office is one 
year, except as otherwise 
provided for herein. 
SECTION 2: Q. 1. No student 
may run for any office of the 
SGA while on disciplinary or 
academic probation and no 
student may be appointed to 
any such office while on 
disciplinary or academic 
probation. 

CL 2. Once in office, 
however, no officeholder may 
be removed from that office 
for any reasons, except as 
otherwise provided for herein, 
except through impeachment 
proceedings by the Student 
Senate as provided for in this 
Constitution. 

SECTION 3: CL 1. A student 
desiring to be a candidate for 
any of the various Association 
offices shall file a written 
"Notice of Intention" with the 
Office of the Vice President of 
Student Affairs prior to a 
deadline set by the Elections 
Board for each election. 

CL 2. The "Notice of In- 
tention" shall consist of the a- 
pplicant's name, 
classification, scholastic 
average as certified by the 
Registrar, and name of office 
for which he intends to seek 
election. 

CI. 3. Candidates will be 
certified as to their eligibility 
by the Elections Board within 
one week after filing. 

CI. 4. The names of those 
candidates which the Elec- 
tions Board certifies to be 
eligible for candidacy for the 
office they seek shall be 
published in every issue of the 
Current Sauce from the time 
of certification until the time 
of the election. 
SECTION 4: CI. 1. A general 
SGA election for Executive 
Council and eleven (11) 
Senators-at-large shall be held 
no later than the fifteenth 
week (counting registration 
week as the first week) of the 
spring semester. 

CI. 2. Class Senators shall be 
elected in a special election 
presided over by the Election 
Board no later than the fifth 
week of the fall semester 
(counting registration as the 
first week.) 

CI. 3. All elections, including 
voting on proposed con- 
stitutional amendments, shall 
be held in the Student Union 
and any other locations set up 
by the Student Senate. Voting 
machines shall be used, if 
available; if voting machines 
are unavailable, locked ballot 
boxes shall be used. Polls shall 
remain open from 8 a. m. to 7 
p. m. on the day of election. 
Commissioners shall be 
named by the Elections 
Board; no commissioner may 
work at the polls if he is a 
candidate for any office to be 
elected in that election. 
Methods and procedures in 
runoff elections must be 
uniform with the general 
election for that office. Poll 
watchers may be appointed by 
the candidates. 

CL 4. In elections for 
Executive Officers of the 
Association or other officer in 
which only one post is vacant, 
and one candidate fails to 
secure a majority of votes in 
the general election, a run-off 
shall be held one week later. 
In the run-off election, the two 
candidates having received 
the largest number of votes 
for each specified office shall 
compete for that office, and a 
simple majority shall elect. 

CI. 5. All candidates for 
Class Senators or Senator at 
large receiving a majority of 
votes cast shall assume office 
after the first balloting. A run- 
off election shall be held no 
later than one week after the 



initial balloting. The top 
number of candidates equal to 
not more than twice the 
number of seats vacant after 
the first balloting shall qualify 
for the run-off election. In the 
run-off election the seats 
vacant shall be filled by those 
candidates receiving the 
highest number of votes. 

CI. 6. Any protest shall be 
heard by the Student Supreme 
Court if presented in writing to 
the Commissioner of Elections 
within forty-eight (48) hours 
after the announcement of the 
winners. The determination of 
a majority in all elections 
shall be defined according to 
Louisiana Law. 
SECTION 5: CL 1. The 
inaugural ceremony shall be 
held during each semester in 
which the Association officers 
are elected. The retiring 
Executive Council and of- 
ficers of the Student Senate 
shall constitute a committee 
for carrying out the inaugural 
ceremonies properly. The 
retiring President of the 
Association, or his 
representative, shall preside 
at the inauguration, and the 
President of the University or 
his representative shall ad- 
minister the oath of office. 

Q. 2. The Oath of Office 
shall be worded as follows : "I, 

do 

solemnly swear (or affirm) 
that I will faithfully execute 
the office to which I have been 
elected and that I will do my 
best to fulfill the duties of my 
office and uphold the Con- 
stitution of the Student 
Government Association of 
Northwestern State 
University of Louisiana." 
SECTION 6: CI. 1. Each of- 
ficer shall assume the 
responsibilities of his office 
immediately upon being 
inaugurated. 

CI. 2. At least one meeting of 
the newly elected Student 
Senate shall be held during the 
period remaining in the spring 
semester after the 
inauguration. The retiring 
President, Secretary, and 
Treasurer of the Executive 
Council, and the retiring of- 
ficers of the Senate shall be 
present at this meeting. At 
this meeting, all standing 
committees shall be appointed 
and a faculty adviser for the 
SGA shall be appointed by the 
Senate, subject to the ap- 
proval of the President of the 
University. 

CI. 3. Those officers elected 
in the fall semester shall be 
inaugurated at the first 
meeting of the Student Senate 
after completion of their 
election. 

ARTICLE VI — 
COMMITTEES 
AND BOARDS 
SECTION 1: CL 1. The 
Standing Committees and 
Board established under this 
constitution shall be the 
following: Community 
Relations Committee, Student 
Loan Committee, 
Organizations Board, Campus 
Security Relations and Traffic 
Committee, School Spirit 
Committee, Cheerleader 
Governing Board, Student 
Broadcasting, Student Ser- 
vices Committee, Student 
Rights Committee, General 
University Coordinating 
Committee, and Committee on 
Committees. 

CI. 2. The Senate shall adapt 
guidelines for the organization 
and general composition of all 
committees except as other- 
wise provided herein. 

CI. 3. The committee on 
committees shall comply with 
the guidelines established by 
the Senate for committees. 

CI. 4. The guidelines on 
committees shall be con- 
solidated into Senate Rules. 
ARTICLE VII 
— FINANCES 
SECTION 1: CI. 1. The general 
Student Body Association fee 
shall be $39.75 for the fall 
semester, allocated as 
follows: POTPOURRI $10.00; 
CURRENT SAUCE $2.00; 
Student Drama activities $.75; 
Student Union program fees 
$6.50; Recreation Facility 



Fund $15.00; Union Board 
Drama fee $1.00; Student 
Government Activity fee 
$2.75; Alumni Dues $.50; 
(should both husband and wife 
of a family be members of the 
Association, only one would be 
required to pay that portion of 
the fees allocated to the 
POTPOURRI); KNWD fee : 
$.50 and Artist Series $.75. 

CI. 2. The general Student 
Body Association fee shall be 
$29.75 for the spring semester, 
allocated as follows: 
CURRENT SAUCE $2.00; 
Student drama activities $.75; 
Student Government ac- 
tivities $2.75; Alumni dues 
$.50; Student Union program 
$6.50; Recreation Facility 
Fund $15.00; Union Board 
Drama Fee $1.00; KNWD fee 
$.50; and Artist Series fee $.75. 

CL 3. The SGA fee shall be 
$14.00 for the summer session 
allocated as follows: 
CURRENT SAUCE $1.00; 
Student Drama activities $.25; 
Student Government Ac- 
tivities $1.50; Alumni Dues 
$.25; Student Union Program 
$3.25; Recreation Facility 
Fund $6.00; Union Board 
Drama Fee $.50; KNWD fee 
$.50; and Artist Series $.75. 

CL 4. Of the Student 
Government activity fee, $1.50 
shall be allocated for the 
operation of the Student 
Government; $.25 for a 
reserve unit; and $1.00 for a 
SGA speaker program. Of the 
Student Union program fee, 
$1.00 shall be used for 
professional drama 
programming under the Fine 
Arts Committee, and $12.00 for 
research and development. 

CI. 5. All full-time students 
including graduate students 
as defined by the NSU 
catalogue shall pay all fees 
designated in this article. All 
full-time graduate students as 
defined by the Dean of the 
Graduate School shall also 
pay the fees enumerated in 
this Article. 

SECTION 2: CL 1. All 
supervisory financial control 
of the SGA revenues and 
expenditures shall be vested 
in the Student Senate of the 
SGA. 

CL 2. The Student Senate 
shall review, accept or reject 
with recommendations of the 
various proposed budgets 
from organizations receiving 
student fees. The Student 
Senate shall meet for 
budgetary reasons to review, 
approve or reject budgets 
from all organizations 
receiving SGA fees not later 
than the seventh week of each 
semester. All said 
organizations must submit 
budgets. 

CI. 3. Expenditures and 
purchases paid out of the 
General Student Body fees 
shall be made through the 
University using normal state 
regulations unless otherwise 
authorized by the Student 
Senate. 

SECTION 3: CL 1. Ex- 
penditures and purchases paid 
out of Student Government 
funds shall be made through 
the normal purchasing 
procedures. 

CI. 2. Other expenditures not 
expressly provided in this 
Constitution shall be made 
only with the majority of those 
senators present. 

CI. 3. Travel expenses of 
students representing Student 
Government, if such trips are 
authorized by the Student 
Senate, shall be paid if ap- 
proved in advance. Receipts 
must be submitted for all such 
expenditures. 

ARTICLE VIII 
-LOAN FUND 
SECTION 1: CI. 1. The student 
Senate shall set up rules afid 
regulations governing the 
Student Loan Fund; and the 
fund shall be administered by 
the Student Loan Committee, 
composed of three faculty 
members named by the 
President of the University 
and three student members 
named by the President of the 
SGA. 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Page 6 CURRENT SAUCE September 21. 1976 



SGA revises constitution 



(Continued from Rage 5 

ARTICLE IX 

— AMENDMENTS 

SECTION 1: CI. 1. An 
amendment to this Con- 
stitution may be proposed by a 
two-thirds vote of the entire 
membership of the Senate or 
by the presentation to the 
Senate or a proposal petition 
signed by 10 percent of the 
SGA and presented to the 
Senate. The amendment must 
contain a statement as to the 
effect date of its provisions. 
SECTION 2: CI. 1. Any 
proposed amendment of the 
Constitution must be 
published in three consecutive 
issues of the CURRENT 
SAUCE prior to being voted 
upon by the association. The 
election to amend the Con- 
stitution shall be held within a 
week following the third 
publication and the election 
will be set up by the Student 
Senate. Ratification of 
Amendments shall be simple 
majority of votes cast. 
ARTICLE X 

— PUBLICATION 
SECTION 1: CI. 1. The official 
newspaper of the Student 
Association shall be the 
CURRENT SAUCE. A 
representative from the 
CURRENT SAUCE shall 
attend all Student Senate 
meetings, and the minutes of 
each meeting shall be printed 
in the CURRENT SAUCE. 
SECTION 2: CI. 1. The staff of 
the CURRENT SAUCE shall 
be determined at the begin- 
ning of each semester the 
frequency of publication and 
publication date, with the 
approval of the Student 
Publications Committee. 

CI. 2. Scholarship positions 
on the CURRENT SAUCE will 
not exceed five full-time 
scholarships, including Editor 
and Business Manager. 

Q. 3. The POTPOURRI 
staff will receive not more 
than five full-time scholar- 
ships. 

CI. 4. The amount of money 
allocated from the respective 
publication agencies for the 
purpose of scholarships shall 
be determined at the begin- 
ning of each semester by the 
Student Finance Commission 
upon recommendation in 
budgets of the publications 
and cannot be changed during 




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any one semester after the 
budgets have been approved. 
SECTION 3: CI. 1. The Student 
Publications Committee shall 
nominate an Editor-in-Chief of 
the CURRENT SAUCE from a 
list of qualified candidates, 
with the approval of the 
Student Senate. 

CI. 2. To be eligible for the 
editorship of the CURRENT 
SAUCE, the candidate must 
have completed at least 45 
semester hours, including at 
least three hours of reporting 
and three hours of editing with 
at least a 2.0 over-all average. 
He must have served on the 
CURRENT SAUCE at least 
one semester prior to his 
selection. 

CI. 3. If no one files for the 
office of Editor-in-Chief who 
meets the qualifications, the 
Student Publications Com- 
mittee may select the best 
qualified candidate, with the 
approval of the Student 
Senate. 

CI. 4. Candidates aspiring to 
obtain the office of Editor-in- 
Chief of the CURRENT 
SAUCE shall file a "notice of 
intention" with the Office of 
Vice President of Student 
Affairs, containing the name 
of the proposed business 
manager and the other most 
important staff members. The 
Committee shall determine 
whether or not each candidate 
is qualified to serve in the 
position to which he is ap- 
pointed. 

SECTION 4: CI. 1. In 
cooperation with the staff of 
the newspaper, the Editor-in- 
Chief shall direct the policies 
of his particular publication; 
he shall be directly respon- 
sible for its publication and its 
contents. 

CI. 2. The Editor shall be 
responsible also for main- 
taining a publication of the 
best possible quality and shall 
seek to protect the integrity of 
the University and the SGA 
while providing an adequate 
medium for the dissemination 
of student views. 

Dancers 
perform 

"Get Up and Boogie" may 
have been an appropriate 
theme for the Chuck Davis 
Dance Company which was in 
residence for one week on the 
university campus courtesy of 
the Northwestern State 
University Distinguished 
Artist Series. 

The dance company which 
arrived in Natchitoches on 
Sunday were here through 
Saturday. The company 
presented master classes, 
lecture demonstrations and 
concert programs for the 
benefit of NSU students and 
Natchitoches Parish school 
children. 

Highlighting the group's 
seven-day residency program 
was a matinee performance 
Wednesday at 10 a. m. and a 
formal concert Thursday at 8 
p. m. Both dance presen- 
tations were held in the A. A. 
Fredericks Fine Art Center 
Auditorium. 

The sponsors of the 
residency of the Chuck Davis 
Dance Company are the NSU 
Distinguished Artists Series, 
the National Endowment for 
the Arts, Louisiana State Art 
Council, the Natchitoches 
Parish School Board and 
Omega Psi Phi and Alpha Phi 
Alpha Fraternitys. 

Conducted Monday, 
Tuesday, Wednesday and 
Friday were master classes in 
African, Afro-Brazilian, 
Haitian, jazz and modern 
dance from 3p. m. until 4:45 p. 
m. in Room 127 in the Health, 
Physical Education and 
Recreation Building. 

Lecture classes were 
conducted in at least four of 
the public schools in the 
parish. All schools in the 
parish were invited to bring 
their students to the Wed- 
nesday morning matinee 
performance. 

Movement specialists and 
master of African Dance, 
Chuck Davis, is the company's 
artistic director. He is a 
unique and gifted dancer- 
choreographer and brings to 
the public new ideas and 
concepts in ethnic and modern 
dance. 



Q. 3. The Editor-in-Chief 
shall receive a full-time schol- 
arship as defined in this 
Constitution. 

SECTION 5: CI. 1. The 
Business Manager shall be a 
member of the Student Body. 
He shall have completed at 
least 45 semester hours, in- 
cluding some courses in ac- 
counting, and he must 
maintain at least a 2.0 average 
over all. 

CI. 2. He shall be responsible 
for the business aspects of the 
publication. He shall also file a 
proposed budget with the 
Student Finance Commission 
at the first of each semester. 

SECTION 6: CI. 1. The 
President of the University 
shall recommend each year, 
with the approval of the 
Student Publications Com- 
mittee, a member of the 
faculty to serve as advisor to 
the CURRENT SAUCE. He 
shall work closely with the 
various editors and shall give 
them advice and assistance in 
the production of the 
CURRENT SAUCE. 

SECTION 7: CI. 1. The 
CURRENT SAUCE is to be 
free of censorship. The editor 
or other staff members shall 
not be arbitrarily suspended 
because of student, faculty, 
administration, alumni, or 
community disapproval of 
editorial policy or content. 
The staff, however, shall 
conform to the editorial 
guidance of the Student 
Publications Committee. 

CI. 2. An editor or staff 
member may be removed 
from his office only by the 
Student Publications Com- 
mittee with the approval of the 
Student Senate. 

SECTION 8: CI. 1. The official 
year book of the SGA of NSU 
shall be the POTPOURRI. 

SECTION 9: CI. 1. The Student 
Publications Committee shall 



appoint an Editor-in-Chief of 
the POTPOURRI from a list of 
qualified candidates with the 
approval of the Student 
Senate. 

CI. 2. To be eligible for the 
editorship of the POT- 
POURRI, a candidate must 
have completed at least 45 
semester hours including 
some hours in magazine 
editing with at least a 2.0 over 
all average. He must have 
served on the POTPOURRI 
staff at least one semester 
prior to his appointment. 

CI. 3. If no one files for the 
office of Editor-in-Chief who 
meets the above 
qualifications, the Student 
Publications Committee may 
select the best qualified 
candidate with the approval of 
the Student Senate. 

CI. 4. Candidates aspiring to 
obtain the office of Editor-in- 
Chief of the POTPOURRI 
shall file a "notice of in- 
tention" with the chairman of 
the Student Publications 
Committee, containing the 
names of the more important 
staff members. The Com- 
mittee shall determine 
whether or not each candidate 
is qualified to serve in the 
position to which he is ap- 
pointed. 

Q. 5. The Editor-in-Chief of 
the POTPOURRI shall file a 
"notice of intention" with the 
chairman of the Student 
Publications Committee, 
containing the names of the 
more important staff mem- 
bers. The Committee shall 
determine whether or not each 
candidate is qualified to serve 
in the position to which he is 
appointed. 

CI. 5. The editor shall be 
responsible for filing a 
proposed budget with the 
Student Finance Commission 
at the first of each semester. 

SECTION 10: CI. 1. The 



^resident of the University 
shall recommend each year, 
*ith the approval of the 
Student Publications Com- 
mittee, a member of the 
faculty to serve as advisor to 
the POTPOURRI. 

ARTICLE XI — 
STUDENT BILL 
OF RIGHTS 

SECTION 1: The student has 
the right to petition the 
government for redress of 
grievance. 

SECTION 2. The student has 
the right to judicial due 
process, including a speedy 
trial, confrontation of the 
plaintiff or his witness, 
council, presumption of in- 
nocence, protection against 
cruel punishment, and appeal 
as defined in the NSU Code of 
Conduct. 

SECTION 3. The student has 
the right to bring suit within 
the regular judiciary struction 
for any violation of right 
guaranteed by the Student Bill 
of Rights or Student 
Regulations. 

SECTION 4. The student has 
the right not to be twice put in 
jeopardy for the same offense. 

SECTION 5. The student has 
the right to invite and hear 
any person of his choice on 
any subject of his choice as 
provided for in the original 
Handbook. 

SECTION 6. The student has 
the right to use campus 
facilities, subject to uniform 
regulations governing the 
facility. 

SECTION 7. The student has 
the right of assembly to 
demonstrate, inform, or 
protest, so long as the normal 
workings of the NSU Student 
Association are not disrupted. 

SECTION 8. The student has 
the right to be secure in his 
possessions against invasion 
of privacy, and unreasonable 
search and seizure. 





THE GOOD, THE BAD, THE UGLY 
- This FBLA Memorial Award 
conveys a great thought but it is 
overshadowed by the ugly debris in 
the background. No one seems to 
know where the debris came from or 



how long it will remain. The 
memorial is between the chemistry 
building and the business building 
and the honor is presented annually 
to the outstanding member of the 
La. chapter of FBLA, who gets his 
name engraved on the stone. 



When vou think 
of mens wear.... 
think of 



ft 



Capim.n's 



Located next to Broadmoor Shoppiny Center 




STATE PRESIDENT — 
Jeff Totten was elected 
State President of Phi 
Beta Lambda Business 
Club last April at LSU 
Eunice. Totten is a third 



Three Columns 



In teres t gro u p 
lists plans 

Whu can define the role of 
wumen in contemporary 
society? A better question 
might be ' Can one define the 
role of women in con- 
temporary society with an 
emphasis on Louisiana 
women?" 

The Natchitoches Area 
Humanist Group, headed by 
Ms. Maxine Taylor, have 
worked out a series of 
programs dealing with the 
question. 

Funded by a grant from the 
Ixjuisiana Committee for the 
Humanities, members of the 
group are Dr. Sara 
Burroughs, Dr. Deanie Moore, 
Dr. Joey Dillard, Mrs. Margie 
Dillard, Ron Chen, Fraser 
Snowden, Roland Pippin and 
the program director, Ms. 
Taylor. 

According to Ms. Taylor, 
several of the programs are 
open to the public: 
•'Womanspeak and Man- 
speak" presented by the Di- 
llards on Thursday, Sept. 23; 
on Oct. 14, Dr. Moore will 
speak on "Images of Women 
in the Media;" and 
"Louisiana Women and the 
Law," a program presented 
by Chen will be presented on 
Oct. 28. These programs will 
be held in the Natchitoches 
Parish Library at 7:30 p. m. 

Other programs are being 
offered to various civic and 
non-school publics in the 
Natchitoches area. 

Bienvenu chosen 
council head 

Dr. Millard Bienvenu, head 
of the Department of 
Sociology and Social Work, has 
been chosen as the new 
chairman of the Council of 
Academic Department Heads 
for the 1976-77 school year at 
NSU. 

Vice-chairman of the 
Council is Dr. Mildred Bailey, 
chairman of the Department 
of Elementary Education, and 
Dr. William Knipmeyer, 
chairman of the Department 
of Social Sciences is the 
secretary. 

Department heads-at-large 
on the council are Dr. Zoel 
Daughtrey, chairman of the 
Department of Agricultural 
and Geological Sciences and 
Dr. Sam Coker, chairman of 
the Department of Health, 
Physical Education and 
Recreation. 

The Council of Academic 
Department Heads at NSU 
was established in 1973 and 
presently has 28 ad- 
ministrators who are eligible 
for council membership. 

Bienvenu said the council 
was established to serve as a 
forum for department heads 
to discuss common problems 
and to study areas of common 
concern for the benefit and 
progress of their respective 
departments and the 
university as a whole. 

The organization, which 
also focuses on academic 
excellence and the ideals of 
higher education, conducted a 
workshop last spring on 
Management by Objectives 
which generated considerable 
interest among university 
administrators. 

Specific goals and ob- 
jectives are being formulated 
by the NSU administrators for 
the coming year. 

Bienvenu stated that some 
of the concerns to which the 
council will address itself 
include the financial crisis in 
higher education as it affects 
Northwestern, updating ad- 
ministrative and managerial 
responsibilities of department 
heads, improvement of in- 
structing and recognition of 
academic excellence. 

semester junior 
majoring in business 
administration and 
economics. He has been 
inPBL since March 1975 
and has served as vice 
president and publicity 
chairman. Totten is also 
in Blue Key, Phi Eta 
Sigma Honor Society 
and the Wesley Foun- 
dation. 



HomeEc Club 
invites freshmen 

The NSU Home Economics 
Club held its first monthly 
meeting for the fall semester 
on Monday, September 3. 
Freshmen and new members 
were invited to meet with the 
faculty, officers and other 
members of the club. 

Jackie Phillips, NSU Home 
Ec Club President introduced 
the faculty members and club 
officers. A skit was performed 
to introduce the new girls to 
the club. Performing in the 
skit were Brenda Melder, 
Cindy Black, and Nancy 
Chaumont. After the skit, 
refreshments were served and 
the girls were allowed to min- 
gle and get acquainted. 

On Monday, September 27, 
the Home Ec. Club will 
sponsor a freshmen and New 
Club Members reception. It 
will begin at 7 p. m. at the 
Home Management 
Residence at the front gate of 
NSU. Refreshments will be 
served. 

The club's officers recently 
returned from a workshop in 
Alexandria which took place 
September 17 and 18. 

Entertainers list 
new fall members 

by Ken Landry 

The Entertainers, NSU's 
rock group which helps in the 
recruiting and the promotion 
of Northwestern, have an- 
nounced their plans for the 
semester. 

This year's schedule has 
The Entertainers appearing 
Sept. 18 at a pre-game 
reception at the Holiday Inn 
and Sept. 25 in conjunction 
with Family Day activities in 
the Student Union. 

During the month of Oc- 
tober, they will perform on the 
ninth for a pre-game supper in 
the Coliseum, at the opening 



session of the Media 
ference in the Fine 
auditorium on the 20th, anrj 
the 22nd and 23rd for 
weekend, at an alumni 
lion, state fair, and before n 
game. 

Their other performs^ 
have them appearing 
homecoming Nov. 13, in 
Orleans Nov. 21, 22 and 23 a 
on a high school tow 
January. 




'harlot ** 



This year's members 
Faren Rayborn, keybo; 
Richard Rudd, base; Way 
Temple. drums; Scot 
Dawson, technician; j | 
Wakefield, rhythm; Rj 
Jackson, lead; C 
Vizena, Gloria Off 
Suzanne Johnson, 
Gregory, Sonja Tolar, r ( 
Gentry, Paul Shelton, singer 

This year, 12 members w« 
chosen for the group, { r „ 
some 60 students 
auditioned in May, said 
Hunt. 



Natchi 
(jiony prese 
season ton 
(front. The i 
soloist: 
and NSU 



ariired 



an „ 
* jch- 

^pranoEarlir 
sing popula 



and H 
Pacific" I 
Satchitoche 



RA Workshop 
now in progress 

The third phase of the R. a 
workshop is still in its plan 
ning stages, said Les Palmer 
assistant to the Director 
Housing. 

The Resident Assistant: 
Training Workshop which i 
being conducted by ihi 
Department of Housing rai 
into a time and work problen 
which has caused a delay ii 
the workshop. 

The third phase will includ 
a study of interpersun; 
communication, rac( 
relations, human sexualitj 
and personal conflicts. Thtian opporti 
phase will be conduct litten Consti 
throughout the school yeatrnment 
according to Palmer. merit has i 

The main purpose of itotefor three 
workshop is to establish I lired by the i 
relationship with the Residenlmany changi 
Assistants in order to meetcmHtitution tl 
their needs along with th«c dealing 



Soprano '. 



Next Tue 



students of the universitv. 




toch. The 
filiates the ofi 
w and Vice 
if two office; 
! new offi 
Ins. The i 
ioner of E 
see all c£ 
»red electi( 
Son also elii 
the Clerk of 
Plan, the Vic 
iding officer 
'tary will s 
**. These 
| with thn 
fhalf scholai 
f Per semesl 
*e was in tt 



*«*CY OF ISSUE 

tyexcept 

«Tl ON DFTKE ME 



editor fNm 

r , p . 



■■W 1 * be gfcvfi. | 



Pro fessor works on cancer cure 



Dr. James L. Rhoades, 
formerly an associate 
professor and director of 
research in chemistry at 
Northwestern State College is 
a member of a research team 
developing a new cancer 
detection procedure for early 
detection through routine 
laboratory tests before 
symptoms appear. Dr. 
Rhoades is Reid professor and 
chairman of the department of 
chemistry at Berry College 
near Rome, Ga. 

Although the study is still 
underway, the reseachers 
believe the test holds con- 
siderable promise as a 
diagnostic aid, particularly in 
the area of cancer screening 
of high-risk individuals. 

The test involves the in- 
teraction of a protein fraction 
of Baker's yeast with a 
specific protein, or group of 
proteins present in human 
serum. The researchers have 
tentatively named this serum 



be* v - 



protein B-protein (Bucov* 
protein) since it has not 
completely identified, and v* k_ 
test is called the B-prote I 



assay. 



The B-protein test if used Jfe^j^ 



assist clinical work, 001 



become a valuable aid in 
detection of individuals 
localized cancer at a 
when a cure is most likely. 
Rhoades explained. 



BLICATIO 
SAUCE 



western 



Of ouned by a 

hoktin 




The research team ' 
included Dr. John 
Morrison, associate profes 
in the department of 
stetrics and gynecology at 
University of Tenness 
Center for Health Scien^' 
Dr. William C. Morris j 
assistant professor, collet?* , 
dentistry at the univers 1 ^ 
and Walter D. Whybre*- 
research associate from , 
department of obstetrics 
gynecology at the univers* 



1 Si L °, , »»«l«OTIOI 
c *. COMPLIM 



"t-r 

I ' U| >NS FROM 



£*jty thai the s 
J* 6 are correct « 

COm pletion e 



•CURRENT SAUCE 



'IS 21LXIV. NO. 4 



e 20th, 



An 



Ird for t ( 
alumni 
nd before 



performaiK, 
ppearing 
v. 13, in I 
22 and 23 
hool tour 



lembers a, 
keyboj 
ase: Wa< 
"s: Sc 
ician: J, 
thni; R icJ 
; Cha 
ia Offoi 
ison, Jej 

Tolar 
Jlton, singer 



Natchitoches-Northwestern 
(ibony present their first concert of 
season tonight at 7:00 on the 
(front. The concert will have two 
;ijred soloists soprano Earline 
ar < $ and NSU percussionist John R. 



o Earline Miller of Alexandria 
sing popular selections from the 
and Hammers tein musical 
fit Pacific" tonight at 7 p. m. when 
Natchitoches-Northwestern State 



if* 



rlo; P 



lembersue, 

group, fro, 
idents m 
ay, said D 

k shaft 

; of the R. a 
in its plan 

Les Palmer 
Director 

Assistant 
op which i 
:d by J 
Housing rai 
ork problen 
i a delay ii 



: will includ 
terpersuna 
>n, raci 
n sexualit) 
nflicts. IV 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 



NATCHITOCHES. LOUISIANA 



September 28, 1976 



tchitoches—NSU Symphony 



Raush 5 Miller perform tonite 




Soprano Earline Miller 



University Symphony Orchestra 
presents its annual downtown river- 
front pops concert. 

Mrs. Miller, who is becoming one of 
Cenla's most promising vocal talents, 
will be singing such popular songs as 
"Some Enchanted Evening," "Bali 
Hai," "Wash That Man Right Out of My 
Hair" and "Wonderful Guy." 

The Alexandria teacher has appeared 
in the Little Theater production of 
"South Pacific" as well as the popular 
opera "Man of La Mancha." She has 
also sung in the chorus for the Matinee 
Music Club Opera performance of "The 
Merry Widow." 

The featured professional talent for 
the local symphony's first concert of 
the season will be NSU percussionist 
John R. Raush. He will be the soloist for 
Fink's composition of ''Concertino 
for Vibraphone and String Orchestra." 
Raush is on the NSU music faculty and 
is the former principal percussionist 
with the Chicago Civic Orchestra, the 
Berkshire Festival Orchestra, the 
Shreveport Symphony and the Austin 
Symphony. 

Also appearing as community talent 
during the outdoor concert, which is 
free to the public, will be the Cane 
Country Square Dance Club of 



)ocument R evised 



Next Tuesday students will 
an opportunity to vote on the 
eunducteJritten Constitution of the Student 
school yeartrnment Association. The 
merit has appeared in Current 
pose of tin [efor three consecutive weeks as 
establish i dred by the old constitution. Of 
the Residenjmaiy changes that were made in 
ler to nieeicoiitttution the most important are 
lg with lh«c tfealing with the Executive 
niversitv. Jnch. The new constitution 
pates the offices of Vice President 
fen and Vice President of Women, 
t* two offices have been combined 
i new office, Commissioner of 
ions. The function of the Com- 
wier of Elections will be to 
see all campus wide, SGA 
sored elections. The new con- 
fen also eliminates the Chairman 
He Clerk of the Senate. Under the 
Plan, the Vice President will be the 
feg officer of the Senate, and the 
"ary will serve as clerk for the 
These new revisions will do 
with three positions and save 
ehalf scholarships, valued at about 
Per semester. Another major 
.e was in the Judicial Branch. In 



■LICATION 



2. DATE Or FILING 

20 Sept 1976 



*«»CY OF ISSUE 

J^ljr^except holidays; test weeks *Tv 

M T '<ySOF KNOVIM OFFICE. OF.fUBUCHTION 1 3.1 U" '~f (- I ' ( [li H). Jlolf On.l /Jl' ('. Jail*"' l"V>tCrj) 

J" Sfts T. Sciences Bids., Northwestern State University 

^Sltoches. L». 71*57 __J*ALchJL£o.cbe« Jtaxiait 



as _ 

ed, and tl* 
B-prote 



the past the SGA President appointed 
justices to the Supreme Court and they 
served for their life at NSU. Under the 
new plan the justices are to be ap- 
pointed by the president for one year 
terms. The newElections Article 
clarifies many points. In the new ar- 
ticle, it is stated that whenever voting 
machines cannot be obtained locked 
ballot boxes will be used. It also states 
that if the Commissioner of Elections is 
running for an office, he or she cannot 
work the polls at that election. It fur- 
ther states that no candidate what- 
soever can serve as a commissioner at 
the election for which he or she is a 
candidate. In the past these points have 
been described as being too vague, in 
the old constitution. Another big 
change is found in Article 5, Section 4, 
Clause 6. It states that any protest shall 
be heard by the Student Supreme Court 
is presented in writing to the Com- 
missioner of Elections with 48 hours of 
the announcement of the winners. 
Under the old constitution the protest 
had to be filed 48 ours afer the election: 
The entire constitution can be found 
inside this weeks issue of Current 
Sauce. 



U S POSTAL SERVICE 

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION 

(Required by 39 U.S.C J6851 



A, NO OF ISSUES PUBLISHED B ANN U A L SU BSC R If T ION 

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Mi Ul. ;;oft.. : iwe»ten, Sut« Jnlversitvt Aa t chl t oches , La. 71457 



**<«0 f Vo, 



NAMES AND COMPLETE ADDRESSES OF PUBLISHER. EDITOR, AND MANAGING EDITOR 



fit? and Address) 



gfeestern State L'alversl ty , Natch itoches , La. 7145_7_ 



«*n..t and Addrctst 



fete Ol-j-.ixon f, T* r . 0. " o.. 523* Northwestern State K atch it oci. es , 

* ' — : * ~~ 

|fT c EDITOR p.Vfl.ni a --ni .IiMthi 



v— >ui i uk tSame and Addrtu) 

*yder , P.O. Uox , Kor t lives t err. State U. , Ha tch i toe hes , La . 71437 

"v, 



owned by a corporation, its name and oddrvn, must be stated and alto immediately thereunder the names and addresses of stock- 
ing or holding I percent or more of total amount of stock If not owned by a corporation, the names and address** of the individual 
P*H be given If owned by o partnership or other unincorporated firm, its name and address, a* uieU as that aj each tndtaiduol must 



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x Ugfl BL« TOTAL AMOUNT OF BONDS. MORTGAGES OR OTHER SECURITIES (If there are none, so state) 



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111 Sl d CEo 'HG II MONTHS D*.'BtC£DINO I2MOI-TMI 

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Wgf, Cocies printed (Set Press Run) 



cui.ation 

through dealers and carriers, street 
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U SUBSCRIPTIONS 



BJ PAlO CIRCULATION ISum of WB1 and 10B2) 



team 
John \ 
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universe' 



L D, »TRi BU riON (Sum of C and D) 



v*p.*° J distributed 

iF>_~5 USE > LEFT OVER. UNACCOUNTED. SPOILED 
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>f H. F 1 and 2—ihould tquat net n 



ial the statements made by me 
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FILING DATE 



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Franklin I. Pressou, Adviser 



Mp LETION BV PUBLISHERS MAILING AT THE REGULAR RATES !S*cl 



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.* a nklin Z. Presson. Adviser 



Natchitoches. Club members will be 
dancing to Hayman's "Pops Hoe- 
Down," and the caller will be Duane 
Fletcher of Bossier City. 

Conducting the concert will be Dr. J. 
Robert Smith, chairman of the 
Department of Music at Northwestern. 

"We are anticipating a good turn out 
for our first concert," said Smith , who 
is recognized as one of the state's finest 
conductors of symphonic music. "Our 
pops programs continue to be well 
received, and I am sure this one will." 

Tonight marks the beginning of the 
orchestra's 11th season, which this year 
includes four major concert per- 
formances and two children's 
programs. 

The next symphony concert is 
scheduled for Dec. 3 on the eve of the 
Natchitoches Christmas Festival. 
Featured on this concert will be Dr. 
Edward A. Rath, concert pianist and 



member of the Northwestern music 
faculty. 

Two major concerts are scheduled 
for the spring semester. The first 
program is on March 1 and will 
spotlight Northwestern choral 
organizations performing with the 
symphony. 

The final spring concert will be on 
April 22 at the Louisiana Outdoor 
Drama Association Amphitheater. The 
guest professional soloist for this 
program will be Dawie Couzyn and 
Mrs. Eugenie Watson Couzyn. 

The first youth concert will be 
presented Nov. 19 at 1 p. m. in A. A. 
Fredericks Fine Arts Center. The date 
of the other youth concert will be an- 
nounced later. 

Season tickets for the 1976-77 sym- 
phony season will be on sale Tuesday 
night. The sale of season tickets will 
continue through Dec. 3. 



Ms. Evans speaks 



Ms. Pat Evans, Chief of the Louisiana 
Bureau on the Status of Women, spoke 
last week to a Home Economics group 
on the current feminist movement. 
Ms. Evans was described by a friend, 
Myrtle Pickering, as "consistently 
aggressive without being offensive ... 
willing to work equally hard for both 
male and female needs." 

During the lecture Ms. Evans pointed 
out La. Civil Code 2404, which states, 
"The husband is head and master of the 
community." She stressed the need for 
a change in this family law adding that 
it ij, not the way a family is structured 
today. 

<T It isn't a matter of making a 
value judgment ... it is a matter of 
saying, "Look at reality as it exists. 
This is how America is today,' " 
stressed Ms. Evans. Women are taking 
the authority positions in the family for 
numerous reasons. Therefore, Ms. 
Evans believes women should legally 
be given more rights as heads of 
households and communities. 

Organized feminism, as 
explained by Ms. Evans, started when 
women began questioning their 
positions, asking where they should or 
should not be. "When women began to 
sepak out for themselves, for feminism, 
they began to make history," added 
Ms. Evans. In July, 1848 feminism 
could clearly be identified. The Senica 
Falls Convention, referred to as "the 
turning point for the women's 
MOVEMENT IN America," marked 
the first meeting of organized feminists 
who attacked traditional roles forced on 
women. During this time women's 
rights were severely limited, especially 



in Louisiana. They worked hard to gain 
the rights to own their own property, to 
vote, to sue for divorce and to receive 
an education. In 1920 the right to vote 
amendment was passed. However, 
Louisiana did not officially ratify this 
amendment until 1970, meaning that for 
50 years women voted illegally in the 
state. When WWII erupted, 
something phenomenal happened to 
women. As Ms. Evans said it, "Uncle 
Sam pointed his finger at men and said, 
'We need you to fight ! " Then he (Uncle 
Sam) pointed his finger at women and 
said, 'We need you to make airplanes so 
tins man can fight!' " Of course, 
women couldn't climb on ladders to 
build planes, because they wore the 
socially approved dresses. "Uncle Sam 
once again pointed his finger at the 
women and this time he said, 'We need 
you to wear pants.' " All of this shows 
that women became "liberated" out of 
necessity. All over the NSU campus 
decisions are being made that affect the 
lives of women students. Ms. Evans 
explained that through involvement in 
these decision-making groups and 
committees a woman student can see 
that her needs are met. As Ms. Evans 
stated, "We are concerned about 
women's needs, our needs." 

The bureau Ms. Evans works for is a 
branch of the Division of Human 
Services. The bureau provides aid for 
female offenders in state institutions, 
women alcoholics and the establish- 
ment of Rape Crisis Centers in the 
state. To receive additional in- 
formation, write to: Ms. Pat Evans, 150 
Riverside Mall, Baton Rouge, LA 
70801. 



One Acts Coming 



A bill of student directed one act 
plays begins Monday, Oct. 4 and 
continues through Thursday Oct. 7 with 
a 10:30 p. m. curtain time. 

"A Marriage Proposal," the hilarious 
comedy by the Russian playwright 
Anton Chekov, is directed by Alice 
Magers. The cast includes Grayson 
Harper, Rick Barnickle, and Sally 
Levasseur. 

"Accident" is a stage adaptation of 
an Agatha Christie murder mystery. 
Alecia Alexander is directing; ap- 
pearing in the show are Tim Evans, 
Terry McCarty, Fabian Bordelon, and 
Myra Beauxis. 



The following is the schedule for the 
plays: Tuesday: "A Marriage 
Proposal" - Natchitoches; "Accident" 
- Rapides; Wednesday: "A Marriage 
Proposal" - Varnado; "Accident" - 
Louisiana; and Thursday: "A 
Marriage Proposal"—" Louisiana; 
"Accident" - Varnado. 

Box Office sales opened Monday for 
season ticket sales. Reservations for 
our major production "Who's Happy 
Now?" playing Oct. 13-16 at 7:30 p. m. 
in the NSU Little Theater can be made. 
The play is NSU's entry this year in the 
Louisiana Division of the American 
College Theater Festival. 



Roads must wait 



Because of the lack of funds, Greek 
Hill, campus parking lots and roads will 
remain in their present condition, 
according to Dean Galloway. NSU 
had received assistance in road repair 
from the state. In previous years 
capital outlay money was given to NSU 
for the maintenance of their roads. But 
the funds were discontinued by the 
state, and NSU is responsible for the 
repair of the roads and parking lots. 



The parkingdec al money had gone 
back to th state and was placed in a 
state fund. Now the college is retaining 
all the decal money and this will assist 
in repairing of some of the roads. 

Dean Galloway explained that the 
repairs needed on campus would be 
costly, and funds are not available for 
this work. The loss of capital outlay 
money to the college was an extensive 
loss. If the funds can be appropriated, 
the repairs on the roads will be done. 




Percussionist John R. Raush 



Election held today 



Today is election 
day at NSU. SGA Class senators will be 
elected and a referendum issue - Mardi 
Gras holidays - will be voted upon. 

An explanation . about the Mardi 
Gras referendum is in order. The 
question is being included on the ballot 
so a survey can be taken of students 
who favor having their Easter holidays 



shortened so to include Mardi Gras as a 
school holiday. The decision to give 
NSU students Mardi Gras holidays 
rests with President Kilpa trick and any 
other administrative officials who 
decide the school calendar. The yes 
or no vote students cast will only be 
used as support material for the SGA 




State Fair 

Notices were 
recently sent to all campus 
organizations concerning State Fair 
nominations for the elections to be held 
Oct. 13. Girls who receive three or 
more nominations will have their 
names placed on the ballot. Deadline 
for State Fair lominatons is Oct. 
6. Nine girls will be chosen from the 
Court and the girl with the most votes 
will be proclaimed the queen. More 
information can be obtained from Dr. 
Richard Galloway's office in the 
Student Union. 



Currently 



Today 

8 a.m. to 7 p. m. 
Class Senator Elections 
Student Union Lobby 



Today 

7:30 p.m. 
Movie - "The Reincarnation 

of Peter Proud" 
Arts & Science Auditorium 
IDs required 

Wednesday, Sept. 29 

7:30p.m. 
Movie - "The Reincarnation 
of Peter Proud" 
Arts & Science Auditorium 
IDs required 

Today 

Lady of the Bracelet 
Acceptance Tea 

4 p. m. 
Cane River Room 

Today 

7 p. m. 

Natchitoches-NSU Symphony Concert 
Riverfront Stage 



Page 2 CURRENT SAUCE September 28, 1976 



SGA candidates speak their minds 



by Stan Tyler 

The students of Nor- 
: thwestern will go to the polls 
on Tuesday, Oct. 5, for the 
purpose of electing new class 
senators. The following 
statements were prepared by 
the candidates and are quoted 
verbatim. 
The following are running 
• for freshman senators : 
5 Melaney Mydland - 1 would 
:lry to provide more 
representation for the 
Students and I will back any 
good, concrete suggestions 
that are offered to me. I'll do 
my best if elected and I won't 
forget the people who voted 
for me. 
Billy Ray Gingles ~ 
I'm running for freshman 
senator because I want to 
, speak out for the freshmen. I 
feel I can be the kind of 
senator the freshmen need 
and desire. I will work with 
the other senators toward 
solutions to the most pressing 
~ .problems facing the students, 
. * especially the freshmen. Some 
of the problems that need 
work are bad roads, 
inadequate parking, and 
longer visitation hours. I 
.'support the new proposed 

- Constitution, but most of all I 
will support the freshmen. 

;: Lynn Waller ~ If 
elected I would work hard to 
try and represent my class. I 
will always be open for 
suggestions and criticism. I 
will follow up on extended 

- visitation as well as on other 
•; subjects of concern to fresh- 
"' men. I am not afraid to 



speak out for the students I 
represent. I realize I would be 
the voice of the freshman 
class in the student govern- 
ment. If elected, I will work to 
the extent of my authority. 

Pitty Cathey - I would like 
to get involved here at NSU 
and help to make it the best 
possible school. I think I can 
best do this by serving as 
class freshmen senator. 

Jan B. Bateman - I would 
like to participate in NSU's 
governmental life. As a fresh- 
man, I see this as a good oc- 
casion to make my college 
years more memorable and 
fulfilled. Being an accounting 
major with future goals of 
entering law, I see this as a 
good opportunity to better 
acquaint myself with 
governmental procedures, to 
work with and to get to know 
my fellow classmen and up- 
per classmen, faculty and 
administrators. 

David Pierson - The reason 
I am seeking this office is to 
take an active part in solving 
the problems, that arise 
among the university's 
organizations. I am running 
because I believe Nor- 
thwestern is a great university 
that can be made greater; I'm 
running to enact rules and 
regulations that coincide with 
the people's will and I want to 
take action on the special 
problems. These areas would 
be lack of parking space, bad 
services, and injustices. These 
are the objectives I will stress 
in my campaign and will 
advocate, if successful. 



Muffett Richardson -- I 
would like to represent the 
freshman class as a whole, not 
just one group. If elected I will 
be the link between my class 

and the governing association 
bringing sound proposals of 
the students to the attention of 
the student government. I 
have served in many govern- 
mental positions in high 
school. 

Charles E. Reed - I desire 
the position of Freshman 
Senator because it will give 
me the chance to voice the 
opinion of the Freshman class 
to the faculty. If I am given 
the chance, I will serve the 
freshman class and the rest of 
the student body to the best of 
my ability. 

Cindy Wyatt - In running 
for the office of Senator I am 
interested in becoming an 
active part of the legislative 
branch of the Student 
Government. If elected I will 
try to do my part by being 
present at all of the meetings. 

Gisele Proby - My personal 
belief is that NSU has already 
excelled in all fields and I feel 
my contribution to the fresh- 
man class will bring about 
more communication and 
understanding If you vote for 
me this will not only be the 
year of the Demons but the 
year of the freshmen. 

The following are running 
for Sophomore Senator: 



Roger D. Adams - I'm 
running for the position of 
Sophomore Senator. My 
qualifications include a 3.53 
grade point average. I'm in 
the College of Education, 
Business and Distributive. 
Last semester I was an AMS 
representative from South 
Rapides. I was elected to the 
position of Secretary- 
Treasurer and I did a fine job, 
according to the Dorm 
Counselor, Neal Trent. I'm 
also a member of Phi Eta 
Sigma, the freshman 
honorary society. I hope to be 
elected and if elected, I will do 
my best and be a con- 
scientious class senator. 

Rhonda Baham - Because 
of my involvement in several 
different organizations on 
campus, I feel that I am able 
to hear the views of the 
students and take action on 
the problems of the campus. I 
also think that my experience 
as Freshman Senator is an 
added qualification. 

Michael Oleske - Since 
coming to NSU, I've taken 
note of several problems 
which we, as students, 
frequently encounter. After 
attending for a year already, I 
believe certain problems are 
major deterrents to our 
education and life at NSU. 
Some people say we can't fight 
the system, but with good 
representation in student 
government we can win our 
struggles for the changes we 
need. My aim is to listen to all 



of your suggestions and fight 
for the improvements which 
we require and deserve. 
Remember - Now is the time 
to remedy our problems. Use 
your vote to help me help you. 

Joe Boyd - As senator I 
have had the privilege to serve 
the Sophomore class. The new 
Student Government 
Association has got the ability 
to really serve the students. I 
would like to continue to serve 
you, to have a chance to finish 
and to encourage programs 
which have been initiated and 
to work to bring this ap- 
propriate services and need to 
you, the students. I have the 
interest, willingness and 
ability to get things done. Give 
me a chance to continue to 
serve and I'll make you a good 
senator. 

The following students are 
running for Junior class 
senator: 

Cleta Bice - From former 
involvement in student 
government, I realize the 
importance of such an 
organization. It takes hard 
work to make the machinery 
of student government func- 
tion. I am willing to apply the 
necessary effort needed to 
fulfill this position. 

John Breland - I am sure 
that I can do an outstanding 
job representing the student 
body in the SGA as a junior 



class senator this upcoming 
year. I have had past ex- 
perience in SUGB and AMS 

and feel that I can use this 
past leadership experience in 
the Student Government 
Association. 



David McKinney - I am 
running for junior senator 
because I want to help the 
students of NSU with any 
problems that arise during the 
semester. I am willing to work 
with the students of NSU to 
make this a better school to 
attend. 

The following are running 
for senior class senator: 

Marvin Roque -- I am 
running for the office of Senior 
Class Senator. I feel that I am 
qualified for this office 
because throughout my school 
days I have been involved in 
student government. In my 
freshman year, I was a 
student representative and 
was involved in some com- 
munity activities. Since I 
joined a fraternity in 1974, I 
have held an office each year 
and am presently president of 
my fraternity. I am also an 
active member of Blue Key 
and the Industrial Education 
Club. If elected I will voice the 
opinion of the student body as 
it is related to me. I will be 
your spokesman in trying to 
make NSU a better place for 
students to live. If you don't 
want your government to be 



on shakey ground vote for the 
Roque. 

Fred Sullivan -- The 
responsibilities of a class 
senator are not to be taken 
lightly. It is imperative that 
senators understand the 
responsibilities of his office 
which include responsiveness 
to the students he represents; 
cooperation with other 
members of student govern- 
ment, independence from 
private interest groups, and 
faithfulness in attending 
senate meetings. I realize and 
understand these respon- 
sibilities and promise to carry 
them out as senior class 
senator. 

Debbie Mayeux - My ex- 
perience here at NSU is that of 
serving as freshman associate 
and various SGA and SUGB 
committees. If elected 
senator, I would work as the 
independent I am. I would 
strive for what all the students 
of NSU want. I want to hear 
gripes because I have griped a 
lot in the last three years but I 
want to do something about 
the student gripes. I want to 
follow through with the 
student opinion. I would work 
hard as your Class Senator. 



Rodney Wise, the other 
candidate for senior class 
senator, was unavailable for a 
statement due to schedule 
conflicts. 



SGA 
at 



• a glance 

*' Pi I 



Pi Ki 

The SGA Sen a J The Beta 
meeting was called to order k t Pi Kapi 
Bob Ryder at fi 31 n.m. uL-ybusy tl 
sent were Thompson, J ,turday i 
Cormick. Raines. Dreher ^ ledges an 
Ball. «fraterni 

jsters a 
D. Walker reported ^celebrate B 
Student Services Committej 
C. Davis discussed blocking, Rowing u 
$500.00 increase per semeste, fcday part 
for fees by Student Advise »ouW like 
Council. McKellar discus^ jsters for £ 
SUGB and Haynes reported <* gnester. 

Last we 
party after 
»e are p 



elections. 



Old Business 



Boyd discussed televisjoLrties for 
interference on KNWD Jarne and 
Varnado dorm and cabl. The offk 
television. ple dge cl; 

llrena, Alh 
New Business ^air, Be 

Vanessa Davis was chosej poyle, and 
to represent SGA in the Lady Pi Kapp 
of the Bracelet pageant. ^tramura 

fith a 

C. Davis appointed Studen cossau Bj 
Services Committee: Sta to king for 
Tyler, Lane Pittard, Debbi] 
Page, Lisa Russell, 
Dyess, Bob Ryder, R g fl 
Adams, Debbie Hawkins 
Suzanne Johnson, Caro 
Martin and Judy Hargrove 



Tau Ka 

The Epsi! 
1 Kappa Eps 

Dyess moved to accept th, 
nominations, V. Davi 
seconded. Appointment 
accepted. 



Johnson moved to adjourn 



Lane seconded. 



Meeting 



adjourned at 7:05 p.m. 

Respectfully submiW Greek al P' 
Debbie Pajf e fratern 

Senate Cler|S° es weU 
complete 



Readers comment on issues and problems 



Mayor Robert DeBlieux 
..Natchitoches City Council: 
i r Dear Friends: 
£ For the past several years 
:g students at Northwestern 
:£ have been expressing their 
£ desire to be allowed to drink 
: beer on campus. 

During this same time 
W period, students at many other 
S-amiversities have been 
allowed this privilege, 
t- (Among thses universities are 
" LSU, USL, Tulane, and 
Southeastern.) These 
universities have enjoyed 
rapid expansion in these 
years, largely as a result of 
more favorable en- 
and pleasant 
atmosphere to be found there. 
Enrollment at Southeastern is 
approaching 13,000. 

While these universities are 
growing at a fast rate, Nor- 
thwestern has, at best, been 
stagnat.. Even though the fall 
:: enrollment will be about 7,000 , 
1 many of these students will 
never spend a single night in 
Natchitoches much less in a 



& the 

^ vironment, 



1 




LAYAWAY 
ACCOUNTS 
WELCOME 



Carter's 
Jewelry 

IN t Hhv I. South 
Phone 352-S940 



dormitory. A large percentage 
of that number is made up of 
persons who attend one of our 
"satellite schools." Still 
another large group making 
up that number is commuters. 

Too many potential students 
from north and central 
Louisiana are heading the 
wrong way, to schools in south 
Louisiana, schools that sell 
beer. 

We feel that if Northwestern 
offered students the same 
privileges as these southern 
schools, they would pause to 
take a more serious look at 
NSU. 

Therefore, we believe that it 
is time that the Ad- 
ministration of Northwestern, 
and the City Council of Nat- 
chitoches give very srious 
consideration to providing 
students at Northwestern the 
opportunity to drink beer on 
campus. 

In the past, two major ob- 
stacles have prevented the 
sale of beer on the Nor- 
thwestern campus. The first 
obstacle was a policy by the 
Louisiana Board of Trustees 
for State Colleges and 
Universities, which stated 
that no school within their 
system could sell beer. Even 
though the Board had this 
policy, it was not uniformly 
enforced. (Southeastern and 
USL are both members of the 
system, yet they have been 



selling beer for years.) North- 
western has abided by those 

rules. 

Recently, on Sept. 10, the 
Board changed it 's policy and 
in the future will allow local 
governing authorities to make 
the decision as to whether 
beer may be sold on a campus 
within their jurisdication 

Obstacle number two is a 
Natchitoches City Ordinance 
which prohibits the sale of 
alcoholic beverage son the 
NSU campus. We are asking 
you to repeal this ordinance. 

The opposition to the sale of 
beer on campus stems around 
two points.: 

1. Some people in Nat- 
chitoches oppose the con- 
sumption of alcohol because of 
religious reasons. 

2. It is alleged that if beer is 
sold at NSU it would cripple 
the businesses in town to sell 
beer, places like the Keg, 
Pickle Barrel, and the 
package liquor stores. 

We contend that these two 
points are not valid. Our 
reasons are as follows: 

1 A majority of the students 
on campus are going to drink 
beer on or off of campus 
regardless of these persons' 
beliefs. We feel that it is much 
more desirable for students to 
drink, if they must, within 
walking distance of their 
dormitoryt rooms rather than 
drink of the "local bar" and 



drive home, using the streets 
of Natchitoches, intoxicated. 

2. Just because beer would 
be served on campus doesn't 
mean that is the only place 
They will 

continue to socialize to a 
certain degree at the local 
gathering places. Also if 
Northwestern did have beer 
on campus we feel very 
strongly that the enrollment 
on campus would increase 
greatly. If the enrollment 
increases, the economy in 
Natchitoches will be helped, 
not hurt. 

We realize that this is a 
touchy situation, but we urge 
you, for the sake of Nor- 
thwestern, for the sake of 
Natchitoches and in a sense of 
fairness for NSU students, to 
accept our request that you 
repeal the city ordinance 
which prohibits the sale of 
beer on the campus of North 
western State University. 

Sincerely, 
Bob Ryder, SGA Senate 
Chairman 

David Walker 
SGA Vice President 



Dear Editor, 

The infirmary--a heaven 
sent help or health hazard? If 
any of you readers are like 
me, by the time you make it 
over to the infirmary, you are 



really sick 
quick relief 



and in need of 
Of course, most 



of us know that the best thing 

to do when any type of illness 
begins to develop is to get 
treatment early before it 
i develops to the point that it 
requires extensive treatment. 
But how many of us on this 
campus actually do this? 

Could it possibly be because 
of the tender loving care and 
prompt, effective treatment 
that is carefully rationed out 
each day at the infirmary, 
especially by certain mem- 
bers of the staff who think that 
hot tang can be the remedy 
for anything from an ingrown 
toenail to double pneumonia 

From the many remarks and 
complaints heard on campus 
concerning the infirmary, the 
TLC and prompt effective 
treatment mentioned above is 
in extremely short supply if' 
not entirely ou t of stock. For 
this and other reasons, many 
people actually leave the 
infirmary feeling worse than 
when they first went seeking 
relief. 

Now hold it. At this point, it 
seems necessary to give 
credit where credit is due. 
Some of the infirmary 
workers are really nice and 
helpful and concerned, doing 
their job correctly and not 
deciding for themselves how 
to run the infirmary 
between their social calls and 
other things. 




COLLEGE REPUBLICAN 
MEETING 

ORGANIZATION MEETING FOR 

FRANK SP00NER 
FOR CONGRESS 

WEDNESDAY, 
SEPTEMDER 29 

6:00 p.m. 

STUDENT UNION QUEEN'S ROOM 

ALL STUDENTS AND 
FACULTY ARE URGED 
TO ATTEND!!! 



But, let us now get back to 
specifics about infirmary 
service. Would you ap- 
preciate having to stand 
outside the locked infirmary 



in the wakinp hour;? of the 
morning, ringing doorbells, 

and banging doors at each side 
of the infirmary, waiting a 
seemingly endless amount of 
time at each door, finally to be 
greeted by a nurse com- 
plaining about not being given 
enough time to get down the 
hall to answer the door? And, 
have you ever needed quick 
relief when you only had a few 
minutes before your next 
class, so you stopped by the 
infirmary? Upon entering, 

you were relieved not to see 
another single patient there 

waiting, only to be confronted 
by the nurse telling you that 
you should have started out 
earlier and come by the in- 
firmary when you had more 
time. 



And does the following 
sound familiar to those of you 
who have visited our in- 
firmary 1.) The same 

speckled pills issued for 

anytning and everytning, omy 

to be followed some time later 



RESEARCH 



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research purposes only. 



by a recommendation to see 
the doctor when the pills did 

not work. 2.) Waiting _ for the 
doctor who is "always on 



highlighted a tew 
prevalent problems. 



mori 



time. 



3.) 



Excessive and 
unecessary distribution of 
such items as cough drops, 
Tylenol, etc., especially when 
the student expresses no need 
for them ( the "take -it-in-case- 
you-need-it "situation . ) 

Undoubtedly, this does not 
totally represent all the views 
of all the students on campus 
relative to our infirmary 
service but hopefully it 



Truly we should be grateful 

to have infirmary privilege toys, 
offered to us on campus fo( **vices 

headquar 
member < 

such a nominal tee ead 9^ a roi 
semester. More and more Hi dqpter, li 

and offer i 



Success in 



fee chapte 
members 
jemester. 
pledgepro 



smor. 



new pledge 



they are 
initiated in 
15. 

Our cha] 
visit from 
chapter I 
from nati 
which is e> 
is 



Concerned 



UNWANTED h a ir from the 
arms, legs & face 
REMOVED. ..quickly and 
permanently by a Registered 
Electrologist. "G. J." 
Johnson, 1013 Parkway Drive, 
Phone 352-4983. By ap 
pointment only! 



SAY IT WITH 
FL0WERS- 
AND LET US 
HELP! 

CORSAGES AND 
ALL-OCCASION 
FLOWERS. 

FLOWER HOOK 

400 JEFFERSON 
PHONE 352-2690 



Current Sauce 



becoming evident that at out 
infirmary you only get 
much as you pay for — or to chapter of 

proudly in 
ladies i 
Studd organizati 
They are 
Sunshine 
Goodrich, 
Susan Hie 
Vicki Kit 
Donald, I 
Sheets, G 
Talamba: 
Brenda 1 
Willie. Su 
«ir new 
received 



BOB RYDER 

Managing Editor 

BILL BOSSIER 

Sports Editor 

PAULA JETTON 

News Editor 

Ronald Buuetta 

Assistant News Editor 

OLU AKINRINADE 

Assistant News Editor 

Craig Bert ho Id 

Cartoonist 



COLETTE OLDMIXON 

Editor 

MARK SMITH 

Advertising Manager 



MARK BANDY 

Business Manager 

RODNEYWISE 

Circulation Manager 

MIKE RABALAIS 

Photographer 

Fair Hyams 
Photographer 



FRANKLIN I. PRESSON 

Adviser 



Current Sauce is 
Northwestern State 



the official publication of the student body 
University in Natchjtoches, Louisiana. 



The 



newspaper is entered as second class matter at the Natchitoches P° 5 ' 
Office under an act of March 3, 1879. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday during the fall and sp r,n9 
semesters with the exception of holidays and testing periods and I* 
weekly during the summer semester. 1 1 is printed at the Natchitoches 
Times, Highway l South, Natchitoches, Louisiana 

Editorial offices are located in Room 225, Arts and Sciences 
Building and telephones are 357 5456 and 357 6874, Business. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are solely those of £ 
student editors and do not necessarily represent the viewpoint of "» 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body of Northwestern 

Letters to the editor are invited and contributions are solicited ><■""' 
students, faculty, and staff and from student organizations. Letters 
must be signed and no more than 500 words to be considered «* 
publication. Names will be withheld upon request. ,„, 
The staff of Current Sauce reserves the right to edit all letters ■<» 
sake of lournalistic style and available space 



Sigm< 

Last T 



CAMPUS 
REPRESENTATIVES 
WANTED 

Sell name brand 
HiFi components 
at discount prices 
in spare time. 
Write... 

Sound $avings 

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N. Miami Beach, Fla. 33179 
_ (305) 652-76W n tt. M ,ke 



V Muffett 
"As far 
Concerned 
Nrage tri 
W)a great 
*°Uld wai 
In 

"*ay s pie 
As head 
orthw 
Diversity 
J* a verj 
Pmcerned 
..tared p 
dedica 
H side-li 
*° eompe 
"I like tl 
B> have 
r*lettcsai 
"od us 
'sides, c 
Netics 
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L^r. Chr 
tyers cal 
Nusing 
L^ons. • 
J* than v 
and 
'S we 1< 
tee in ye 



DISCOUNT 
PRINTING 

IBM Bond Copf 

Phone 352-6466 
132St.DenisSi 



September 28. 1976 CURRENT SAUCE Page 3 



••••••• 



A, TTK<1> 



nee . 




aks ex hi $m 

Greek Review - 



— T * E 

O P<E KHH> ITT ^B^V ^I 



' Pi Kappa Phi 

GA Serial The Beta Omicron Chapter 
ed to orders Pi Kappa Phi has been 
31 n m - Kry busy this last week. Last 
ompson, ^jturday the little sisters, 



ceremony during the Sig Tau 
party after Saturday night's 
game. 

We had a great time at a 
charjter exchange last 
Thursday night with the 



is 



Dreher^, edges and actives painted sislerr of Sigma Kappa 



j,e fraternity house. The little 
asters also helped us 
■eported (^brate Beta Omicron's 20th 
Committe, pthday this past week by 
ed blocking , browing us a surprise bir- 
per semesttfjiday party. The brothers 
lent Adviso^jould like to thank the little 
lar discus^ jsters for all of their help this 
^nester. 

Last weekend we had a 
party after the SFA game and 
ft are presently planning 
Jfljprties for the Nicholls State 
KNWD jjgiiie and for Tech weekend. 



's reported o, 



ed televisj 



ar, d cabli The officers for the fall's 
pledge class are Thomas 
Urena, Allen Lawerence, Ron 
jtobair, Bert Bertran, Randy 
was chosea|poyle, and Rick Salle. 

Pi Kappa Phi opened its 
Intramural football season 
tith a victory over 
d St "den cossau Bandits. We are 
Sta looking forward to continued 
success in intramurals. 



V in the La^ 
pageant 



Debb H 



littee 
ttard, 
usseli 
lyder, R 0j 
ie Hawkj 
ison, Caro 
y Hargrove, 
o accept the 
V. Davii 
appointment! 



sd to adjourn 



35 p.m. 



Debbie Pag 



tew 

ems. 



m or 



dd be grated 

iry privil 
n campus fa 



ial tee ead 



and active of the week 
Dona Charpentier. 

A fireside chat will be held 
tonight after the drop letters 
ceremony. 

Congratulations go to 
Zandra Haymon for being 
sorority. Refreshments were chosen Programs Editor for 
served at the Sig Tau house. >UGB and for being sunshine 

The pledges sold T shirts of the week our first week. 
Saturday morning at several 
shopping centers to raise 
money for their class. This 
successful project was just 
one of the many that the 
pledges have planned for this 
fall. 

And last week, the house got 
a thorough washing after the 
actives and pledges had their 
"annual" water balloon fight. 



Cup is sponsored oy the 1FC 
and is awarded every 
semester to the social 
fraternity with the highest 
scholastic average. 



following the game to enhance 
the "Omega Spirit." 

On Sunday, Sept. 12, the 
chapter initated six young 
men into the Lampados Club. 



Saturday, the 25th, the They are : Joseph Cook, Mack 
sorority held an openhouse on Everett, Charles Green, Willie 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 

The Epsilon Chapter of Tau 
Kappa Epsilon welcomes into 
pledgship Fabian Bordelon of 
Harksville. This now gives 
He chapter eight associate 
members for the fall 
semester. Our 

pledgeprogram is coming 
i. Meetiii] 1110 " 8 smoothl y- Already, the 



new pledges have learned the 



fully submitli Greek alphabet and some of 



the fraternity's history. If all 

Senate iClertV s wel1 and if tne P led 8 es 
complete their requirements, 

they are scheduled to be 

initiated into TKE by January 

Our chapter is expecting a 
visit from Tim Overtree, our 
chapter Services Director 
from national. His visit, 
which is expected to last three 
is one of the many 
services that our national 
headquarters offers the 
member chapters. He will 
sjve a routine review of the 
and more it \ filter, listen to suggestions, 
and offer advice. 



it that at oui 
only get ai 



ned 



ce 



H 

inager 

iger 

E 

iager 

MS 

her 



Sigma Tau Gamma 

Last Tuesday night, Nu 
for — or less] chapter of Sigma Tau Gamma 
proudly initiated fifteen young 
ladies into the Roses 
Studen) organization of the chapter. 
They are Laura Baronne, 
Sunshine Cloud, Tammy 
Goodrich, Lynette Harrison, 
Susan Hietz. Jennifer Karr, 
Vicki Kitchen, Robin Mc- 
Donald, Denis Robin, Cindy 
Sheets, Gewn Smith, Patty 
Talambas, Linda Taylor, 
Brenda Terry, and Debbie 
Willie. Sunshine Cloud is also 
our new White Rose. She 
received her crown at a 



Kappa Sigma 

The brothers would like to 
wish the football team good 
luck against Arkansas State. 

Kappa Sigma had a disco 
party following the Delta State 
game. The fall pledge class 
put on all the entertainment 
during the party. 

We also held chapter ex- 
change with Delta Zeta this 
past Thursday at T and B 
olantation. The brothers all 
had a great time and hope the 
sisters of Delta Zeta enjoyed 
the same. 

The intramural team had its 
first game last week. Mon- 
day's game was rained out. 
Wednesday, Kappa Sigma 
beat Tau Tau Kappa Ep- 
silon. 

The chapter is currently 
getting plans underway for 
Tech weekend. The brothers 
are staying in the Riverboat 
Inn with a dance following the 
game with music provided by 
Magenta. We encourage 
everyone to back the Demons, 
because this could be the 
brothers this past Thursday. 

We would also like to thank 
Randy Lee from the Bunker 
Club for his participation in 
the pep rally this past Thur- 
sday. 

The chapter has its Big 
Brother club under way. The 
pledges received their big 
brothers this past Thur- 
sday . 

Sigma Kappa 

Sigma Kappa will have drop 
letters ceremony for the 
pledges tonight at 6:30 p.m. 

Football practice was held 
this Sunday at 4 p.m. and the 
first game was scheduled for 
Monday at 5:30 p.m. 

The new pledge class of- 
ficers are Katie Moore, 
President; Mandy Tuttle, 
Vice-President; Julie 
Breazeale, Secretary; and 
Maggie Hebert, Treasurer. 

Sunshine of the week is Amy 
Yarbrough; Pledge of the 
week is Claudia Blanchard, 



Kappa Alpha 

* Kappa Alpha hosted a 
chapter exchange with Delta 
Zelta last week. The chapter 
expresses their thanks to the 
ladies of Delta Zeta for en- 
joyable company. 

The intramural football 
team takes on Phi Beta in 
their first game of the year. 
The team is showing ex- 
ceptional talent at all positions 
and should fare well in in- 
terleague play. Experience 
will play a major part with the 
offence directed by Arty 
Gibson pitching to Eddie 
Childers or going deep to 
"Wild Bill Bossier." Bob 
Anglin, the coach of the '76 
team will anchor a deep of- 
fensive line. 

Old pro Charlie "Fuzzy" 
Brittain will be main star 
rushing with Bubba Philen 
anchoring the linebacker 
position. A young but quick 
secondary will provide deep 
protection. Kappa Alpha 
captured second and third in 
the punt, pass, and kick 
competition held last week. 

Kappa Alpha congratulates 
the Demons on a fantastic 
game Saturday night against 
Stephen F. Austin and wished 
them luck against Delta State. 
The chapter would like to 
congratulate Brother Foster 
on a well-played game. 

Kappa Alpha had a jungle 
juice party after the game at 
Grand Ecore. 

Congratulations go out to 
Lisa Hunt for the "skimpiest 
pajamas" award she won at 
the party after the Stephen F. 
Austin game. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 
During the week of Sep- 
tember 13-17 the girls of Tri- 
Sigma enjoyed two chapter 
exchanges with Sigma Tau 
Gamma and the Kappa Sigma 
Fraternites. 

Tuesday morning, Sept. 21, 
while everyone on campus 
was sleeping, the actives 
kidnapped the pledges at 5:30 
a.m. and took the pajama-clad 
bunch to the sorority house for 
hot donuts, coffee and orange 
juice. The pledges were 
surprised again when their 
pledge meeting. They weren't 
too uDset because the actives 
came prepared with cookies, 



Greek hill for all the parents 
coming to NSU's Family Day. 

Tri-Sigma has nominated 
three girls for Lady of the 
Bracelet. They are Marylyn 
Bartek, Debra McHalffey, and 
Kim Cole. 

Alpha Phi Alpha 

On Sept. 17, Theta Chi Chapter 
of Alpha Phi Alpha initiated 
five young men into Sphinx 
Pledge Club for the fall. They 
are James Bowie, Anthony 
Butler, Kenneth Conant, Billie 
Culbert and Charles Neal. 
Elected as pledge club officers 
were James Bowie, president; 
Charle3 Wear, vice-president 
and secretary; Kenneth 
Conant, treasurer; Billie 
Culbert, reporter; and An- 
thonly Butler, parlimentarian. 

Last Sunday the Sphinxmen 
attended services at First 
Baptist Church on North 



Lee, Greg Pudley, and Steve 
Woodridge. The Lampados 
Club held two "Disco Tex" 
this past weekend which 
turned out to be a success. 
Delta Zeta 

Following the pep rally, 
Delta Zeta held a chapter 
exchange with the brothers of 
Kappa Sigma fraternity, 
Thursday, Sept. 23 , at Terry 
Down's camp. We would like 
to thank them for the nice 
time. 

Nine girls were initiated into 
the sisterhood of Delta Zeta 
Sunday, Sept. 26, at 7 a.m. in 
the Delta Zeta Lodge. A 
banquet was held in honor of 
the girls after the chapter 
attended the Immaculate 
Conception Catholic Church. 
The girls initiated were were 
Laurie Leslie, Karen LeJeune, 
Marrie Strahan, Connie 




WHAT ARE THESE 9 Electronic 
equipment is an integral part of 
radio transmission. This student. 



although he admires the gadgets 
seems baffled as to their use. 



NRAA holds first meeting 



Street. The Sphinxmen would Smith, Jennifer Karr, Bar- 
like to sincerely congratulate bara Hodgeboom, Cleta Bice, 



their Big Brothers for 

securing the President's Cup 

for the second consecutive 

semester. 

Kappa Alpha Psi 

The brothers of Kappa 



Shelia Crosby, and Peggy 
Gunter. Lamplighting was 
held last Friday, followed by a 
slumber party at the DZ lodge. 

Delta Zeta would like to 
welcome these girls to their 



Alpha Psi sponsored a dance sisterhood. 
Beaudion's grill Sept. 17 & 18. The officers of the 1976 fall 



Newly elected .iofficers of 
the Theta Lambda Chapter of 
Kappa Alpha Psi are as 
follows: Paul Dumars, 
polemarch; Emmett Roque, 
keeper of records; Sammy 
Seymour, exchequer; James 
Oliphants, dean of pledges; 
Gregory Grew, reporter; and 
Woody Green, graduate ad- 
visor. 

New inititates to the 
Scrollers Club are Vernon Eli, 
Ronnie Evans, and Henry 
Jackson. 

Omega Psi Phi 



Pledge Class are B.J. Shoun, 
president; Penny Birch, vice- 
president; Fran Wise, 
treasurer, Amy Cupit, 
secretary; Debbie Stephens, 
parlimentarian, Wendy Mau, 
songleader; and Anne Mason, 
Panhellenic. 

Pledge of the week was 
Aimee Dowdell. 

Delta Zeta would like to 
congratulate Sunshine Cloud 
for being named Sigma Tau 
Gamma's Whiterose, Spring 
Cloud for being chosen Blue 



Key Sweetheart, Jennifer 
The Theta Delta Chapter of Karr for being a Sigma Tau 
the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Gamma rose, Suzette Tugage 
Inc. held their for being selected Theta Chi 

annual meeting with alumni Little Sister president, and 



brothers of the chapter on 
Saturday, Sept. 18, at the 
Pizza Inn's Social Room. The 
business discussed in the 
meeting included past ac- 
tivities, present issues con- 
cerning the chapter and long 
range plans of the chapter 



Fran Wise for winning second 
in the doubles in the Nat- 
chitoches City Tennis Tour- 
nament. Congratulations, 
girls. 

Phi Mu 

Friday night before the 
Stephen F. Austin game, the 



NSU Head Athletic Trainer 
dedicates life to welfare of athletes 



WESSON 



it body * 



isiana. 
itoches 



TM 
pos' 



Muffett Richardson In dealing with injured 

"As far as knowledge is players Christmas has 
f°ncerned, I'm just an become sensitive to their 
"erage trainer, but I like this psychological as well as 
*a great deal. I don't think I physical needs. While a few 
J°uld want to do anything athletes are over-anxious 
In this field there's after an injury to get back 
*ays plenty to do." 
As head athletic trainer of 
^rthwestern State 
University, Eugene Christmas 
a very heavy schedule, 
^eerned with the care of The Alpha Phi Alpha social 
"lured players, Christmas fraternity was presented with 
[•dedicated his life to get- ^ coveted president's Cup 

Saturday night during the 
halftime activities. 



onto the field, there are also 
those who are too cautious and 
put off returning to action. 
"With some athletes you do 
have to give some 
reassurance," Mr. Chris 
states. 



The brothers attended the pledges had a slumber party 
game together Saturday night at the Phi Mu house. Although 
and cheered the Demons on they did not get much sleep, 
to victory. The brothers also they had a good time, just 
had a social gathering being together. Kappa Iota 

chapter of Phi Mu would like 
to congratulate their new 
pledges: Julie De jeans, Linda 
Legger, and Julie Thibodeaux. 
After the pledging ceremony 
on Sunday, Sept. 19, the> 
chapter members went to 
Shreveport and ate lunch at El 
Chico's. Afterwards, the 
actives treated their little 



Alpha Phi Alpha wins cup 



llandsP r ' n ' 
■iods and * 
aatchitocne* 

id science 5 ' 
ness. _) 
those of W 
„ point of "* 
western. 
.licited" * 

isidered W 



li letters 



in 
in- 



« side-lined athletes back 
competition. 

I like the competition that 
54 have in athletics. 
T^etics are worthwhile and a 
£>d use of time, 
^sides, competition 
Pities makes life 
testing." 

LJfr- Chris, as the football 
r v ers call him, anticipates a 
Rising season for the 
T^ons. -We've got a better 
than we've had in several 
and I'm optimistic. ..I 
i "* we look better than we 
iLir 1 years." 



petition. 

The award was 
reestablished in 1961 for use in 
interfraternity academic 
competition. 



He adds that "a few athletes 
react better when nothing is 
said." 

Now in his 12th year as NSU 
athletic trainer, Eugene 
Christmas expresses an at- 
titude about his work that 
makes him popular in colleges 
throughout the country. "I 
spend a lot of time at this and I 
believe I'm dependable. I feel 
confident in my ability, but I 
also know my shortcomings 
...There is so much to know 
and learn in athletic train- 
ning." 



by Marvin Norton 
Students at NSU discovered 
what "ham radio" was all 
about last Wednesday at the 
Northwestern Amateur Radio 
Association's (NRAA) first 
meeting held in the Old 
Russell Library 

The NRAA has a cluD state 
license from the Federal 
Communications Com- 
mission; their call sign is 
WB5RHX; and the radio 
transmitting apparatus is 
located on the third floor of 
Russell Library. This is the 
same building that houses 
classrooms of the Department 
of Industrial Education and 
Technology. 

This station is operated by 
fifteen club members which 
include students of NSU, 
amateur radio operators of 
the local area and staff 
members, according to Ed- 
ward Domangue, assistant 
professor of electronics. 

Domangue said the purpose 
of ham radio was to enhance 
international goodwill and 
brotherhood, to extend the 
background in radio skills, 
and to serve as an assistant 
during public disasters, 
national and local 
emergencies. He added that 
amateur radio was different 
from commercial and C. B. 
radio. 

The club, beginning its 

second year of operation, is a 
continuation of the club begun 
ten years ago by Dr. Rene 
Bienvenu, dean of the College 
of Science and Technology. 

An aim of the club is to in- 
troduce to as many students 
as possible a chance to get into 
amateur radio, become 
licensed members, and "have 
the world at their fingertips," 
Domangue stated. 

The main problem in 
amateur radio is that students 
confused ham radio with 
KNWD, and there is no af- 
filiation. "We are completely 
different," Domangue said. 

^asn^T^^nTdshieldsat 

Maggio's and Shamrock's to 
raise money for their fall Grub 



Amateur radio requires a 
little knowledge of radio and 
some electronics. A license is 
obtained by passing an 
examination consisting of 
practices of electronic theory, 
and the sending and receiving 
of Morse code. An exam is 
given by the club and one of 
the licenses can be obtained 



developed an interest into a 
hobby. Ham operators come 
from all walks of life because 
it is a hobby. 

Ham radio operators need 
no professional education or 
professional knowledge 
because most of the assistance 
one gets is from other hams. 

During the meeting of 
NRAA Dr. Bienvenu and 



by mail. 

There are many unalike Presson demonstrated the 

features of the C.B. and ham radio by modul ating with a 

radio. Dr. Bienvenu said. ln Austral "i. 

They are not on the same NRAA is a chartered 

meters as the C. B.'s; they student organization of NSU 

work off of eleven meters and and is affiliated with the 

ham radio works several American Relay League, 
different meters. 

"A 



good many people 
become interested in ham 
radio through C.B's," Bien- 
venu said. 

Franklin Presson of the 
Department of Speech and 
Journalism, and Dr. Bienvenu 
are not in occupations which 
deal with radio, yet both 



In 1952 Dr. Bienvenu 
became interested in hams. C. 
L. Mitchell, an electrician at 
NSU, began in ham radio in 
1965 and his interest was 
aroused by the Navy. Mitchell 
said, "I have not grown tired 
of it because ham radio is 
something that keeps your 
interest once you start in it." 



sisters to an afternoon of ice ™ e P^ect was very 

skating successful. The chapter is 

On Thursday and Saturday lookin 8 forward to <^ nce 
afternoons the members which ^ be held on Friday, 

October 15. 




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Presenting the award was 
Dean Frederick Bosarge, 
dean of student personnel and 
the Interfraternity Council 
(IFC) sponsor. Receiving the 
award for Alpha Phi Alpha 
were Harry Smith and Hilton 
Verret. 

The President's Cup was 
established in 1903 when NSU 
was Louisiana Normal School 
by B. C. Caldwell for In- 
tersociety Athletic com- 



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IN NATCHITOCHES 

Phone NSU Hot-Line 352-6466 



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Page 4 CURRENT SAUCE September 28, 1976 



Demons sack 7th ranked Delta St. 17- 



The Northwestern Demons 
have proved that there is no 
place like home. 

In playing their second 
game in Natchitoches since 
the 1974 season and the second 
game in Demon history in 
Hafry "Rags" Turpin 
Stadium, the Demons put 
together a superlative effort 
by beating the Statesmen 
from Delta State 17-7 before a 
near capacity crowd of 9,200 in 
the partially completed 
stadium. 

Defensive play by the 
Demons was the key to the 
win. The aggressive play by 
the Demon defense only 
allowed the Statesmen to get 
paydirt once in the contest. A 
goal line stand by the Demon 
defense in the third quarter, 
with NSU holding a one touch- 
down lead, proved to be the 
turning point in the game. 

With first and goal at the 
NSU 7, the Statesmen 
managed to get to theone in 
three tries. On fourth and 
down, DSU failed to score on a 
wide run by Adams, with 
Donnie Pis tonus making an 
excellent open field tackle. 

When Coach Williams was 
asked after the game about 
any defensive standouts, he 
replied, "Gosh, all eleven of 
them." 

One thing that worried the 
NSU coaches, players, and 
fans was an injury early inthe 
contest to Ail-American 
candidate at fullback Sidney 
Thornton. Thorton, who was 
plowing over Delta defenders 
and showing why he is 
nicknamed "The Bull," had 42 
yards in only six carries 
before being injured on a right 



sweep at about the eight 
minute mark in the first 
quarter. 

Thornton never re-entered 
the ball game and his injury 
was diagnosed as a bruised 
knee. X-rays will be made to 
check for ligament or car- 
tilage damage. 

Second string fullback Brett 
Knecht, freshman from St. 
Mary's, filled in for Thornton, 
gaining 35 yards on nine 
carries. Knecht was injured in 
the game, making way for 
another freshman running 
back, Mark Schroeder. 

Schroeder, coming in 
toward the end of the third 
quarter, ran with reckless 
abandon. The freshman from 
Harahan-Bonnabel carried 15 
times for 73 yards, making 
him the leading ground gainer 
in the game. Schoeder 
credited his outstanding 
performance to perfect 
blocking by his offensive line 
and cited Frank Ha ring for his 
excellent lead blocking that 
sprung Schroeder on many 
left sweeps for long yardage. 

The Demons got on the 
scoreboard first, but it could 
be said that it was a present 
from .DSU. NSU, with 
Thornton and Co. in the game, 
took the opening kickoff from 
their own one yard line to the 
DSU 32. The Bull showed his 
stuff early, as he made 
several runs over 10 yards in 
the drive before getting in- 
jured. 

The drive faltered at the 
DSU 32 and Pendergraft hung 
an excellent punt that was 
downed by Kenny Meeks at 
the one foot line. On the next 



play, DSU quarterback Jim 
Nyers fumbled and Roscoe 
Lewis recovered for the 
Demons. 

It took the Demons three shot 
to get the ball in the end zone 
with Stuart Wright doing the 
honors on a Quarterback 
sneak. Pendergraft's PAT 
was good, making it 7-0 
The kicking game was also 
singled out by Coach Williams 
as being a factor in the 
Demons' victory. Dennis Pen- 
dergraft punted 7 times and 
had a 40 yard average. His 
first punt was downed at the 
one foot line and his longest 
one for the evening was a 51 
yard boomer. Pendergraft 
made his first field goal of the 
season after missing two in 
the season opener. He missed 
a 45 yard attempt early in the 
fourth quarter against DSU, 
but came back later and 
booted a 37 yarder right 
through the uprights. Both of 
Pendergraft's PAT's were 
good, after going 5 for 7 in 
PAT's against SFA. 

An eleven yard play, 66- 
yard drive gave Delta State 
their first and only score of the 
evening. Tailback Jessie 
Jackson scored on a two yard 
run around left end and the 
Van Poppel PAT tied the 
score early in the second 
quarter. 

Both teams made several 
mistakes, many the result of 
very aggressive play. Late- 
hits and other personal foul 
penalties gave each team 
better opportunities with the 
Demons taking the better 
advantage of these op- 
portunities. 
Delta State had problems 



holding on the ball, partially 
because of the hard hitting of 
the Demons defense. The 
Statesmen fumbled 11 times 
and lost five of them. The 
Demons fumbled twice, but 
managed to regain possession. 

Another DSU fumble set up 
the second Demon TD. Jessie 
Jackson, the DSU tailback, 
fumbled when hit on a right 
sweep and Donnie Pis tonus 
recovered for the Demons. On 
the first and 10 for NSU, Stuart 
I Wright scrambled around in 
the back field and finally 
found Mike Almond all alone 
in the end zone for a 25 yard 
touchdown pass completion. 

The turning point of the 
game occurred when a DSU 
scoring opportunity that 
could have tied the game was 
halted by the swarming 
Demon defense. 

A fourth and goal situation 
from the NSU one yard line 
fell short for the Statesmen as 
Demon strong safety Donnie 
Pis tonus hauled down DSU's 
tailback Reese Adams on a 
sweep attempt to the left side. 
The Demons did not move 
with the ball here but the 



failure to score seemed to 

DSU as they were not to scorp 
again. 

A fourth quarter drive, 
spearheaded by the hard 
running of Schroeder led to 
Pendergraft's first successful 



field goal of the season. 
Schroeder, running the 

sweep left with Haring and Co. 
taking care of the defender, 
gained 26 yards on two such 
plays. Runs by Schroeder and 
Haring moved the ball to the 



20 where Pendergraft booted 
the 37 yard field goal. 



The Demons face a stiff test 
next week as they leave the 
friendly confines of Turpin 
Stadium and travel to La. Tech. 



Jonesboro, Arkansas 
the Ark. St. Indians 
sas/ St., a national power j£ / 

last few seasons has droprw, 
three straight games^ 
eluding last Saturday's loss 1. 1 

t o T U *• ' 




Ag Club rodeo to be held Oct. 7-8 



The annual fall rodeo 
sponsored by the Agriculture 
Club of Northwestern State 
University will be held Oc- 
tober 7-6 p.m. each night in the 
Natchitoches Parish 
Fairgrounds Arena. 

This year's rodeo will 
feature a college show 
Thursday night and an open 
show Friday. Northwestern 

students will be competing for 
trophy buckles in the college 
show, and amateur cowboys 
and cowgirls from throughout 
the state will enter the open 
show. 

The Northwestern 
Agriculture Club rodeo is 
being produced for the first 
time by the Tommy Baker 
Rodeo Company of Frierson 



Baker's rodeo stock is know 
throughout the Ark-La-Tex. 

He produces a weekly 
Saturday night rodeo at the 
Southside Riding Arena in 
Keithville. 

NSU's rodeo, which last fall 
broke attendance records at 
the fairgrounds arena, is 
being sponsored for the first 
time in conjunction with the 
Natchitoches Parish Fair, 
which is scheduled for October 
5-9. 

NSU Agriculture Club 
president Robbie Scarborough 
of Natchez said this will be the 
first time in several years that 
a rodeo has been held in 
conjunction with the parish 
fair. It is also the first time 
the Ag Club has sponsored an 
open show. 



Rodeo events in which 
contestants will be competing 
are bull riding, team roping, 
calf roping, barrel racing, calf 
scramble, pole bending, 
buddy barrell pick-up, goat 
sacking, wild cow milking, 



Entry books for Nor- 
thwestern student only will 
open at 8 a.m. on Oct. 4 and 
will close on Oct.6. 

Persons may enter the open 
show on Friday night by 
calling Baker at 318-861-7044 
or by writing the producer at 
Rt. 1 Box 78, in Frierson. 

Admission charges for 
rodeo performances will be $2 
for adults and 1.50 for 
students. Children under the 
age of six will be admitted 
free. 



Pigskin Predictions 




Last weeks predictions were 
the best yet. Everyone was 
around the .70 mark. Glad to 
see Tech finally won a game, 
but poor old Tulane. The 
Demons and LSU both keep on 



winning. 

This weeks guest panelists 
are Bill Hochstetler, Director 
of Intramurals and Dr. Miller, 
professor in the Chemistry 
and Physics Dept. Last weeks 



guest panelists said they 
would beat me, and of course, 
they didn't, but Bob Ryder 
did. 




NSU vs. ARK. ST. 

LSU vs FLA. 
TUL vs VANDY 
MCNEESE vs MARSHALL 
NICH vs CAMERON 
GRAM vs HAWAII 
ALA vs GEORGIA 
OHIO ST. vs UCLA 
SLU vs J'ST. 
USL vs LA. TECH 
CINCI vs CLEVE 
DET. vs GREEN BAY 
HOUSTON vs N.O. 
L. A. vs MIAMI 
WASH vs CHICAGO 



BOSSIER 



ARK. ST. 14-13 
LSU 17-10 
VANDY 24-12 
MCNEESE 27-13 
NICH 14-6 
GRAM 17-13 
GEORG. 12-7 
UCLA 21-20 
J'ST. 16-14 
USL 33-14 
CINCI 35-13 
DET 28-7 
HOUSTON 31-13 
L.A. 24-16 
WASH 17-16 






NSU 14-10 
LSU 13-10 
TUL 10-0 
MCNEESE 24-14 
NICH 14-10 
GRAM 31-17 
BAMA 21-10 
OHIO ST. 14-10 
J'ST. 7-3 
TECH 17-13 

CINCI 28-21 
DET. 14-13 
N.O. 13-10 
L. A. 10-7 
WASH 21-10 



HOCHSTETLER 



ARK. St. 24-12 
LSU 17-14 
VANDY 21-6 
MCNEESE 21-6 
NICH 24-14 
GRAM 17-6 
BAMA 24-7 
UCLA 21-14 
J'ST. 24-6 
TECH 21-14 
CINCI 28-14 
DET. 14-3 
HOUSTON 28-7 
MIAMI 24-14 
WASH 28-10 



MILLER 



NSU 21-17 
FLA. 17-14 
TUL 14 -7 
MCNEESE 10-7 
NICH 14-3 
HAWAII 21-17 
GEORGIA 24-21 
OHIO ST 17-10 
SLU 17-14 
TECH 24-17 
CINCI 24'14 
DET. 24-7 
HOUSTON 31-14 
MIAMI 24-17 
WASH 21-14 




Wright is truly no. 1 quarterback 



20 c WASH 

NATCHITOCHES' ONLY 
DISCOUNT WASHATERIA 

WITN 
ATTENDANT OR DUTY 

8 BM, - 5 Ptffli 

OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY 
700 COLLEGE AVE. 

SIBLEY'S 

DISCOUNT WASHATERIA 
352-9441 



WHERE IT GOES, 
NOBODY KNOWS... 
Intramural flag football 
began last week with 
some very interesting 
piav. 



To Stuart Wright, last 
Saturday's runaway 47-0 win 
over Stephen F. Austin wasn't 
any different than the week 
before. 

"We did the exact same 
things that we did against 
Lamar, Wright said. "The 
only difference was that we 
didn't waste any chances and 
we didn't give away any cheap 
scores." 

Yhe big win was a far cry 
from the previous Saturday, 
when the Demons pushed 
Lamsr all over the field but 
ended up on the losing end of a 
17-6 score in Beaumont, Tex. 
NSU had a 307-142 advantage 



in total offense in that game. 

"We didn't make any 
mistakes Saturday night," 
Wright said of the offensive 
unit. "The blocking was crisp 
and everbody just gave a 
great effort." 

The 5 foot, 10 inch, 185-pound 
senior product of Nat- 
chitoches-Central has been 
leading the NSU offense on a 
near-record pace. Through 
two games, the Northwestern 
unit has run up an up an 
average of 360 yards per game 
in total offense, 200 on the 



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ground and 160 in the air. 

Not bad for a quarterback 
who hadn't started a game for 
over two years before this 
year's season opener. 

Wright had played in the 
shadows of stellar quar- 
terback Butch Ballard for two 
seasons. Ballard suffered a 
shoulder injury late last 
season and complications 
have kept him out of action 

The Demons didn't miss him 
too much Saturday night, 
though, as they scored on all 
but one of their first-half 
possessions. And on the one 
instance Dennis Pendergraft 
was forced to punt, the 'Jacks 
fumbled it and the Demons 



recovered it on the four yard 
line. 

"Once we got that fumble 
and got in for a score like that, 
I knew that it was all over," 
Wright said. "Those kind hurt 
mentally, and it was obvious 
that it affected the way they 

(SFA) were playing." 

"We took the first drive and 
scored with it, too, and that 
helped to get us started. 
Playing at home in front of our 
own fans helped a whole lot, 
too." 

It was a new experience for 
many of NSU's players. The 
Demons had to travel to every 
game last season because of 
construction on Harry "Rags" 



SHAMROCK 
DISCOUNT LIQUOR 

ATTENTION NSU 
STUDENTS- WE'VE GOT 
THE ATMOSPHERE, THE 
PRODUCT, & THE PRICE. 
COME DY & TRY US. 



302 HWY. 1 SOUTH 



352-8309 



Stadium, which is now par* 
tially completed. 

Northwestern's largest 
student turnout in several 
years helped to christen the 
structure. "That student si* 
was just about full, and they 
were in a good place-rig*" 
behind us," Wright said. 

Saturday night was also » 
sign of things to come, as 
Wright turned over the 
quarterback duties before 
halftone and his younger 
brother, David, filled in the 
slot for much of the second 
half. The younger Wright, « 
freshman from St. Mary's, nijj 
on two of two tosses for ~ 
yards, including a 46 ya^ 
touchdown. 



He's not ready to turn ove f 
the job to him yet. Not u# 
after this season, anyway- 



JOE BOYD 

SOPHOMORE 
CLASS 
SEHAT0R 

PAID FOR BY 
JOE BOYD J 



PRE 

le, the S 
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■■■■■■ 



■■■■■mi I 




September 28. 1976 CURRENT SAUCE Page 



7" (Student Government Association announces 
hanges in constitution/ Elections Oct. 5 





id they 
f course, 
) Ryder 




LLER 



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Arkansas to f a 
. Indians. Ark^l 
ational power 3 / 
sons has drop^, 

ght games™, PREAMBLE 
Saturday's lo* ^ the Students of Nor- 
,estern State University of 
„jsiana, grateful for the 
|jrtunity of living in a free 
iptry, desiring to benefit 
pour inherent right of self- 
^rnment, and seeking to 
(intain and improve our 
jeral welfare in this 
national environment, do 
^by adopt and establish 
s Constitution. 

NAME 
e name of this organization 
,11 be the Student Govern- 
■gt Association of Nor- 
lestern State University of 
■VIS- 
AUTHORITY AND 
RESPONSIBILITY 
fbe authority vested in 
ident Government by this 
nstitution shall not be 
jred or retracted except 
rough procedures 
icifically enumerated in 
I Constitution. Only those 
rers defined in the Con- 
lution shall be the 
(jonsibility of the Student 
lernment. 

MEMBERSHIP 
[embership in this 
inization shall include the 
cutive, legislative, and 
icial officers of the student 

ARTICLE I — 
LEGISLATIVE BRANCH 

CTION I: CI. I. All 
Illative powers of the 
rthwestern State 
irersity Student Govern- 
t Association shall be 
lied in a unicameral 
Went Senate. 

pION 2: CI. I. Members 
k be elected for one year 
ims, elections to be held 
lice each year. The Student 

fie shall consist of twenty 
elected members. All 
Inner Student Body 
taidents shall serve as ex- 
Stiomembers of the Senate. 
.21 Two Senators shall be 
Med from each un- 
flraduate class: two Fresh- 
% two Sophomores, two 
prs, two Seniors, and one 
(•tor from the Graduate 
' tool, elected by members of 
Irrespective classes. 
1 3. Eleven (11) Senators 
p be elected by the 
jabers of the Student Body 
jfcrge. 

jl I. The Vice President of 
fSGA shall appoint two 
*H5 members from the 
We to serve on the Student 
* Governing Board as 
tided for in the Student 
m Constitution. 
■5. The Student Senate 
1 the right to appoint 
lent associates to perform 
tasks for the Senate 
bers. 

ON 3: Q. 1. The Student 
shall have the sole 
of impeachment and 
°val. No Student 
^rnment Association 
^■tive officer may be 
od place-rigM ^ d from his office ex- 
right said. f ^ough impeachment 

in 



.vsa 



h is 

id. 



now par* 



rn's largest 
ut in several 
to christen tlx 
at student side 
full, and they 



ht was also « 
to come, a 3 
d over the 
iuties before 
his younger 
, filled in the 
of the second 
ger Wright, » 
St. Mary's, hit 
tosses for 5j 
lg a 46 yard 



k removal proceedings 
Student Senate. When 
for that purpose, they 
he on oath or af- 
tion. The Chief Justice of 
lent Supreme Court 
Reside. No person shall 
Evicted without the 
ce of two-thirds of 
^embers present. 
ON 4: CI. 1. The Student 
shall be the judge of all 
0,1 returns from elec- 



[y to turn ovef 
yet. Not unt" 
m, anyway- 




l conducted by the 
pissioner of Elections 
the qualifications of 
for those offices, 
£ upon recommendations 
I Elections Board. 

Two-thirds shall 
I 'Ute a quorum to do 



The Senate is 
to compel the 
members in 



Sized to 
>riee of 



J Planner and under such 
No, 



ttea 



as provided for in 



t^es of the Senate. 
*• The Student Senate 
^ermine the rules of its 



and with the con- 
of two-thirds of those 
• expel a member as 
by the rules. 



SECTION 5: CI. L The Student 
Senate shall make university 
wide student rules and 
regulations, appropriate all 
revenues of Student Govern- 
ment, confirm or deny by 
majority such nominations as 
the Student Body President 
shall from time to time be 
called upon to make, to keep 
informed concerning the 
attitude of the Student Body 
with regard to all problems of 
student interest; provide for 
the general welfare of the 
student body, and make 
recommendations to the 
Student President, to consider 
and take a action upon all 
matters referred to it by the 
University Administration. 
SECTION 6: Q. 1. No Student 
Senator shall serve simultane- 
ously in any executive or 
judicial office of the Student 
Government Association of 
Northwestern State 
University. 

SECTION 7: CI. 1. Every bill 
which shall have passed the 
Student Senate shall, before it 
be enacted, be presented to 
the Student Body President. If 
he approves he shall sign it, 
but if not he shall return it 
with his objections to the 
Student Senate for recon- 
sideration. If after such 
reconsideration two-thirds of 
the Senate present and voting 
shall agree to pass the bill, it 
shall be passed. If any bill 
shall not be returned by the 
Student Body President within 
seven days after it shall have 
been presented to him, the 
same shall be enacted in like 
manner as if he had signed it. 

CI. 2. Having been enacted 
by the Northwestern State 
University Student Govern- 
ment Association, all acts 
except those specifically 
dealing with the internal 
operation of the Student 
Government Association shall 
be presented to the President 
of the University; if he ap- 
proves he shall sign it, but if 
not he shall return it with his 
objections to the Student 
Senate whereupon the Senate 
shall reserve the right to 
submit the bill to the 
Louisiana State Board of 
Trustees for their approval or 
disapproval. If any bill shall 
not be returned by the 
President of the University 
within ten working days after 
it shall have been passed and 
presented to him, the same 
shall be enacted in like 
manner as if he had signed it. 
ARTICLE II — 
EXECUTIVE BRANCH 
SECTION i: CI. 1. The 
executive power of the Nor- 
thwestern State University 
Student Government 
Association shall be vested in 
the Executive Council, which 
is composed of a Student 
President, Student Vice 
President, Executive 
Secretary, Executive 
Treasurer, and a Com- 
missioner of Elections. Each 
shall hold office during the 
term of one year. The 
Presidents of The Association 
of Men Students (AMS), and 
The Association of Women 
Students (AWS) shall serve as 
ex-officio members of the 
Executive Council. 
SECTION 2: CI. 1. A Student 
Body President shall be 
popularly elected by majority 
vote of ballots cast by 
members of the Student Body, 
in an election held for that 
purpose. The Student 
President shall at the time of 
his election and for the term 
be a member of the NSU 
Student Body for at least one 
year. He shall have completed 
at least forty-five (45) 
semester hours; he shall have 
served on the Student 
Government Association in an 
elective office for a full 
semester. 

SECTION 3: CI. 1. If the office 
of Student Body President 
should become vacant 
because of absence or tem- 
porary disability, the Vice 
President shall act as 
President. If the office of 
Student Body President 
should become vacant 



because of resignation, 
removal, or permanent 
disability, the Vice President 
shall become Student Body 
President. The Chairman of 
the Senate shall succeed the 
Student Body Vice President 
in line of succession. 

CI. 2. Should a vacancy in an 
executive office arise, a 
special election shall be held 
within three weeks of the 
accepted resignation unless 
that office is to be terminated 
within 60 days, in such case 
the office shall be filled by 
appointment. In the meantime 
the president may appoint a 
temporary replacement. 
SECTION 4: CI. 1. The Student 
Body President shall have the 
power, by and with the advice 
and consent of the Student 
Senate, to nominate and ap- 
point all officers and members 
of the Student Government 
Association not otherwise 
provided for herein. 

CI. 2. He shall have the 
power to fill all vacancies in 
the Senate with the approval 
of a majority of the Senate. 

CI. 3. He shall have the 
power to call special meetings 
of the Student Senate when he 
deems such meetings 
necessary, or when requested 
to do so by a majority of the 
total membership of the 
Student Senate or when 
petitioned to do so by a 
minimum of 10 percent of the 
members of the Student Body. 

CI. 4. The Student President 
shall have the power to select 
the student members of all 
boards and committees and 
appoint the chairmen of each, 
with the approval of the 
Student Senate, where such 
chairmen or members are not 
otherwise provided for in this 
Constitution. He shall also 
have the power to remove t- 
hose committee officers and 
members with majority ap- 
proval of the Senate. 

CI. 5. He shall represent the 
Student Body on all official 
occasions and coordinate 
student activities and ser- 
vices. He may address the 
Student Senate, recommend 
for their consideration such 
measures as he shall deem 
necessary and expedient; he 
may convene the Student 
Senate in extraordinary 
session and take care of all 
acts of the Student Senate; he 
is responsible for faithfully 
executing the acts that are 
passed. 

SECTION 5: CI. 1. A Student 
Vice President shall be 
popularly elected by the 
Student Body to serve for a 
term of one year, as provided 
for by this Constitution. He 
shall have completed at least 
45 semester hours of academic 
work, and have served on the 
Student Government 
Association in an elective 
office, for at least one 
semester at the time of filing. 

CI. 2. The Student Vice 
President shall succeed the 
Student President as provided 
for in Section 3. He shall serve 
as chairman of the Student 
Services Committee, and he 
shall coordinate all com- 
mittees. 

CI. 3. He shall serve as 
presiding officer of the Senate. 
SECTION 6: CI. 1. A Com- 
missioner of Elections shall be 
elected by the members of the 
Student Body to serve for a 
term of one year, as provided 
for by this Constitution. He 
shall have completed at least 
45 semester hours of academic 
work. 

CI. 2. He shall serve as 
chairman of the Elections 
Board which shall supervise 
all elections conducted by the 
SGA. 

CI. 3. The Commissioner 
shall appoint the member of 
the Elections Board subject to 
approval of the Senate. 
SECTION 7: CI. 1. An 
Executive Secretary shall be 
popularly elected by the 
Student Body to serve a term 
of one year. 

CI. 2. The Executive 
Secretary shall be responsible 
for all official correspondence 
and records and shall serve as 



Secretary of the School Spirit 
Committee, and will serve as 
the Senate Clerk. 

CI. 3. The Executive 
Secretary shall faithfully 
execute all acts and measures 
delegated to her by the 
Executive Council. 
SECTION 8: CI. 1. An 
Executive Treasurer shall be 
popularly elected by the 
Student Body to serve a term 
of one year. He shall have 
completed the first basic 
accounting course with a 
grade of C or better. 

CI. 2. It shall be the 
responsibility of the Executive 
Treasurer to secure from the 
Business Office of the 
University within one month 
after the beginning of the 
semester a statement of the 
funds available for use by the 
Student Government Assoc- 
iation, to pay out money ap- 
propriated by the Student 
Senate and sign all approved 
requisitions, to transmit 
authorization for expenditures 
authorized by the Student 
Senate, to make a report of the 
Association's financial status 
once each month at the first 
meeting of the Student Senate 
of that month, to provide same 
for publication in the 
CURRENT SAUCE, to pur- 
chase all awards and supplies 
upon being properly 
requisitioned for same, and 
serve as chairman of the 
Budget Committee. Failure to 
perform said duties shall be 
considered malfeasance in 
office. 

SECTION 9: CI. 1. The Student 
Senate shall create such 
organs as shall be necessary 
and proper for the im- 
plementation of the duties and 
powers of the Executive 
Council. 

SECTION 10: CI. 1. The 
President of the Student 
Government Association shall 
receive a full-time scholarship 
(a full-time scholarship 
provides a stipend equivalent 
to the total cost of the in- 
firmary fee, dining hall meal 
ticket, rental of any dormitory 
room, registration fee and 
other fees charged at 
registration). The Vice 
President, Commissioner of 
Elections, Secretary and 
Treasurer of the Association 
shall each receive a half-time 
scholarship (a half-time 
scholarship provides a stipend 
equivalent to one-half that of 
the scholarship of the Student 
Body President. 

CI. 2. The scholarships for 
the President, Vice President, 
Commissioner of Elections, 
Secretary, and Treasurer of 
the Association shall be paid 
out of the General Student 
Body funds. The scholarships 
of the CURRENT SAUCE 
staff members shall be paid 
from the funds of the 
CURRENT SAUCE Agency; 
and the scholarships of the 
POTPOURRI staff shall be 
paid from the funds of the 
POTPOURRI agency. These 
scholarships shall be paid at 
such times and in such 
manner as are the other 
student employment positions 
Df the University. 

CI. 3. The stipend paid all 
office holders may not be 
changed by vote during the 
one year tenure of each office 
bolder. 

SECTION 11: CI. 1. No 
executive officer shall 
simultaneously hold office in 
the Student Senate, Student 
Supreme Court, Student Union 
Governing Board, Associated 
Men Students or Associated 
Women Students Executive 
Committees. 

ARTICLE IN- 
JUDICIAL BRANCH 
SECTION 1: CI. 1. All judicial 
powers of the Student 
Government Association shall 
be vested in one Student 
Supreme Court and inferior 
courts of the Associated 
Women Students and 
Associated Men Students, or 
other courts established by the 
Student Senate from time to 
time. 

SECTION 2: CI. 1. The 
justices, both of the Supreme 



and inferior courts, shall be 
regularly enrolled students at 
the time of their appointment 
and confirmation. Members of 
the Student Supreme Court 
shall serve one year or until 
they resign or cease to be 
regularly enrolled students at 
Northwestern State 
University or shall be im- 
peached and convicted for 
cause upon a two-thirds vote 
of the Student Senate. 
SECTION 3: CI. 1. The Student 
Supreme Court shall consist of 
seven (7) members. 
SECTION 4: CI. L The Student 
Body President shall fill all 
vacancies on the Student 
Supreme Court as they occur, 
with the approval of the 
Student Senate. One justice 
shall be appointed by the 
President as the Chief Justice. 
SECTION 5: CI. I The judicial 
power of the Student Supreme 
Court shall extend to all cases 
arising under the Constitution 
and the acts of the Student 
Senate. 

CI. 2. The Court shall have 
original jurisdiction in all 
cases involving controversies 
between organizations and 
students, organizations and 
other organizations, students 
and faculty, students and 
administration, and all cases 
to which Student Government 
shall be a party, if not 
otherwise provided for in the 
Constitution or Code of Con- 
duct. 

CI. 3. It shall be the highest 
appellate court in the student 
judicial system and may call 
cases before it on its own 
initiative. 

CI. 4. This Court shall hear 
appeals from the Judicial 
Boards of AWS and AMS. 
SECTION 6: a. 1. No court 
may render an opinion, hear 
evidence, nor pass judgment 
in the absence of a quorum. 
Quorum for the Student 
Supreme Court shall be 5 
members. 

SECTION 7: CI. 1. The Student 
Supreme Court shall follow 
procedures prescribed in the 
Student Supreme Court 
Procedures and the NSU Code 
of Conduct. 

ARTICLE IV 
SECTION Is CL 1. Upon 
petition by ten percent (10 
percent) of the Student Body, 
the Student President shall 
call and preside over a 
general meeting of the Nor- 
thwestern State University 
Student Government 
Association. 

SECTION 2: CI. 1. The 
members of the Student Body 
may recall any elected 
representative if the petition 
providing for a recall election 
shall be signed by the number 
of members of the Student 
Body in the affected officers 
constituence equal to five (5) 
percent and provided that the 

question "Shall 

be retained as a 

- officer of the SGA," shall 
receive a two-thirds (2 3) 
majority of the nay votes cast. 



SECTION 3: CI. 1. Any bill 
being considered for passage 
by the Student Senate may, by 
a majority vote of the Senate, 
be referred to the members of 
the Student Body for their 
approval. In such case the 
Student Senate shall provide 
for the publication of such bill 
in CURRENT SAUCE three 
consecutive issues prior to 
such election. For such bill to 
be enacted it must receive a 
two-thirds majority of the 
votes cast. Balloting on such 
bill shall take place at such 
time and in such manner as 
provided by the Student 
Senate, and the results of such 
an election shall be binding 
upon the Student Senate. 
ARTICLE V — 
ELECTIONS 
SECTION 1: CI. 1. Every 
officer of the SGA shall have, 
at the time of filing for office, 
and at the time of 
inauguration an over-all "C" 
average as certified by the 
Registrar. Any SGA officer or 
appointee, including 
cheerleaders, judges and 
editors and staff members of 



publications, shall be 
automatically disqualified 
from holding office at the end 
of any semester in which his 
over-all scholastic average 
falls below this minimum 
requirement. 

CI. 2. All candidates for 
election to the Student Senate 
or the Executive Council of the 
Student Government must be 
eligible to serve two full 
semesters. 

CI. 3. Term of office is one 
year, except as otherwise 
provided for herein. 
SECTION 2: CI. 1. No student 
may run for any office of the 
SGA while on disciplinary or 
academic probation and no 
student may be appointed to 
any such office while on 
disciplinary or academic 
probation. 

CI. 2. Once in office, 
however, no officeholder may 
be removed from that office 
for any reasons, except as 
otherwise provided for herein, 
except through impeachment 
proceedings by the Student 
Senate as provided for in this 
Constitution. 

SECTION 3: CI. 1. A student 
desiring to be a candidate for 
any of the various Association 
offices shall file a written 
"Notice of Intention" with the 
Office of the Vice President of 
Student Affairs prior to a 
deadline set by the Elections 
Board for each election. 

CI. 2. The "Notice of In- 
tention" shall consist of the a- 
pplicant's name, 
classification, scholastic 
average as certified by the 
Registrar, and name of office 
for which he intends to seek 
election. 

CI. 3. Candidates will be 
certified as to their eligibility 
by the Elections Board within 
one week after filing. 

CI. 4. The names of those 
candidates which the Elec- 
tions Board certifies to be 
eligible for candidacy for the 
office they seek shall be 
published in every issue of the 
Current Sauce from the time 
of certification until the time 
of the election. 
SECTION 4: CI. 1. A general 
SGA election for Executive 
Council and eleven (11) 
Senators-at-large shall be held 
no later than the fifteenth 
week (counting registration 
week as the first week) of the 
spring semester. 

CI. 2. Class Senators shall be 
elected in a special election 
presided over by the Election 
Board no later than the fifth 
week of the fall semester 
(counting registration as the 
first week.) 

CI. 3. All elections, including 
voting on proposed con- 
stitutional amendments, shall 
be held in the Student Union 
and any other locations set up 
by the Student Senate. Voting 
machines shall be used, if 
available; if voting machines 
are unavailable, locked ballot 
boxes shall be used. Polls shall 
remain open from 8 a. m. to 7 
p. m. on the day of election. 
Commissioners shall be 
named by the Elections 
Board; no commissioner may 
work at the polls if he is a 
candidate for any office to be 
elected in that election. 
Methods and procedures in 
runoff elections must be 
uniform with the general 
election for that office. Poll 
watchers may be appointed by 
the candidates. 

CI. 4. In elections for 
Executive Officers of the 
Association or other officer in 
which only one post is vacant, 
and one candidate fails to 
secure a majority of votes in 
the general election, a run-off 
shall be held one week later. 
In the run-off election, the two 
candidates having received 
the largest number of votes 
for each specified office shall 
compete for that office, and a 
simple majority shall elect. 

CI. 5. All candidates for 
Class Senators or Senator at 
large receiving a majority of 
votes cast shall assume office 
after the first balloting. A run- 
off election shall be held no 
later than one week after the 



initial balloting. The top 
number of candidates equal to 
not more than twice the 
number of seats vacant after 
the first balloting shall qualify 
for the run-off election. In the 
run-off election the seats 
vacant shall be filled by those 
candidates receiving the 
highest number of votes. 

CI. 6. Any protest shall be 
heard by the Student Supreme 
Court if presented in writing to 
the Commissioner of Elections 
within forty-eight (48) hours 
after the announcement of the 
winners. The determination of 
a majority in all elections 
shall be defined according to 
Louisiana Law. 
SECTION 5: CI. 1. The 
inaugural ceremony shall be 
held during each semester in 
which the Association officers 
are elected. The retiring 
Executive Council and of- 
ficers of the Student Senate 
shall constitute a committee 
for carrying out the inaugural 
ceremonies properly. The 
retiring President of the 
Association, or his 
representative, shall preside 
at the inauguration, and the 
President of the University or 
his representative shall ad- 
minister the oath of office. 

CI. 2. The Oath of Office 
shall be worded as follows: "I, 

do 

solemnly swear (or affirm) 
that I will faithfully execute 
the office to which I have been 
elected and that I will do my 
best to fulfill the duties of my 
office and uphold the Con- 
stitution of the Student 
Government Association of 
Northwestern State 
University of Louisiana." 
SECTION 6: CI. 1. Each of- 
ficer shall assume the 
responsibilities of his office 
immediately upon being 
inaugurated. 

CI. 2. At least one meeting of 
the newly elected Student 
Senate shall be held during the 
period remaining in the spring 
semester after the 
inauguration. The retiring 
President, Secretary, and 
Treasurer of the Executive 
Council, and the retiring of- 
ficers of the Senate shall be 
present at this meeting. At 
this meeting, all standing 
committees shall be appointed 
and a faculty adviser for the 
SGA shall be appointed by the 
Senate, subject to the ap- 
proval of the President of the 
University. 

CI. 3. Those officers elected 
in the fall semester shall be 
inaugurated at the first 
meeting of the Student Senate 
after completion of their 
election. 

ARTICLE VI — 
COMMITTEES 
AND BOARDS 
SECTION 1: CI. 1. The 
Standing Committees and 
Board established under this 
constitution shall be the 



Fund $15.00; Union Board 
Drama fee $1.00; Student . 
Government Activity fee. : 
$2.75; Alumni Dues $.50; 
(should both husband and wife 
of a family be members of the 
Association, only one would be-. - jj 
required to pay that portion of. 
the fees allocated to the 
POTPOURRI); KNWD fee 
$.50 and Artist Series $.75. 

CI. 2. The general Student 
Body Association fee shall be 
$29.75 for the spring semester, 
allocated as follows: 
CURRENT SAUCE $2.00; 
Student drama activities $.75: 
Student Government ac- 
tivities $2.75; Alumni dues 
$.50; Student Union program 
$6.50; Recreation Facility 
Fund $15.00; Union Board - 
Drama Fee $1.00; KNWD fee 
$.50; and Artist Series fee $.75. 

CI. 3. The SGA fee shall be 
$14.00 for the summer session 
allocated as follows: 
CURRENT SAUCE $1.00; 
Student Drama activities $.25; 
Student Government Ac- 
tivities $1.50; Alumni Dues 
$.25; Student Union Program 
$3.25; Recreation Facility- 
Fund $6.00; Union Board 
Drama Fee $.50; KNWD fee 
$.50; and Artist Series $.75. 

CI. 4. Of the Student 
Government activity fee, $1.50 
shall be allocated for the 
operation of the Student ' 1 
Government; $.25 for a 
reserve unit; and $1.00 for a 
SGA speaker program. Of the 
Student Union program fee, 
$1.00 shall be used for 
professional drama ^ 
programming under the Fine 
Arts Committee, and $12.00 for 
research and development. 

CI. 5. All full-time students 
including graduate students 
as defined by the NSU 
catalogue shall pay all fees 
designated in this article. All 
full-time graduate students as . 
defined by the Dean of the 
Graduate School shall also :; 
pay the fees enumerated in;.^ :: 
this Article. 

SECTION 2: CI. 1. All 
supervisory financial control 
of the SGA revenues and " 
expenditures shall be vested 
in the Student Senate of the 
SGA. 

CI. 2. The Student Senate 
shall review, accept or reject 
with recommendations of the 
various proposed budgets 
from organizations receiving 
student fees. The Student 
Senate shall meet for 
budgetary reasons to review, 
approve or reject budgets 
from all organizations 
receiving SGA fees not later 
than the seventh week of each 
semester. All said 
organizations must submit 
budgets. 

CI. 3. Expenditures and 
purchases paid out of the 
General Student Body fees 
shall be made through the 
University using normal state 



following: Community regulations unless otherwise 
Relations Committee, Student authorized by the Student 
Loan Committee, 
Organizations Board, Campus 



Security Relations and Traffic 
Committee, School Spirit 
Committee, Cheerleader 
Governing Board, Student 
Broadcasting, Student Ser- 
vices Committee, Student 
Rights Committee, General 
University Coordinating 
Committee, and Committee on 
Committees. 

CI. 2. The Senate shall adapt 
guidelines for the organization 
and general composition of all 
committees except as other- 
wise provided herein. 

CI. 3. The committee on 
committees shall comply with 
the guidelines established by 
the Senate for committees. 

CI. 4. The guidelines on 
committees shall be con- 
solidated into Senate Rules. 
ARTICLE VII 
— FINANCES 
SECTION 1 : Q. 1. The general 
Student Body Association fee 
shall be $39.75 for the fall 
semester, allocated as 
follows: POTPOURRI $10.00; 
CURRENT SAUCE $2.00; 
Student Drama activities $.75; 
Student Union program fees 
$6.50; Recreation Facility 



Senate. 

SECTION 3: CI. 1. Ex- 
penditures and purchases paid 
out of Student Government 
funds shall be made through 
the normal purchasing 
procedures. 

CI. 2. Other expenditures not 
expressly provided in this 
Constitution shall be made 
only with the majority of those 
senators present. 

CI. 3. Travel expenses of 
students representing Student 
Government, if such trips are 
authorized by the Student 
Senate, shall be paid if ap- 
proved in advance. Receipts 
must be submitted for all such 
expenditures. 

ARTICLE VIII 
— LOAN FUND 
SECTION 1: CI. 1. The student 
Senate shall set up rules and 
regulations governing the 
Student Loan Fund; and the 
fund shall be administered by 
the Student Loan Committee, 
composed of three faculty 
members named by the 
President of the University 
and three student members 
named by the President of the 
SGA. 

(Continued on Page 6) 




Page 6 CURRENT SAUCE September 28, 1976 



SGA revises constitution 



(Continued from Page 

ARTICLE IX 
— AMENDMENTS 

"SECTION 1: CI. 1. An 
amendment to this Con- 
stitution may be proposed by a 
two-thirds vote of the entire 
membership of the Senate or 
by the presentation to the 
Senate or a proposal petition 
signed by 10 percent of the 
SGA and presented to the 



b) 



list of qualified candidates, 
with the approval of the 
Student Senate. 

CI. 2. To be eligible for the 
editorship of the CURRENT 
SAUCE, the candidate must 
have completed at least 45 
semester hours, including at 
least three hours of reporting 
and three hours of editing with 



at least a 2.0 over-all average. 
Senate. The amendment must He must have served on the 



contain a statement as to the 
effect date of its provisions. 
SECTION 2: CI. 1. Any 
proposed amendment of the 
"Constitution must be 
published in three consecutive 
issues of the CURRENT 
SAUCE prior to being voted 
upon by the association. The 
election to amend the Con- 
stitution shall be held within a 
week following the third 
publication and the election 
will be set up by the Student Qhief 
Senate. Ratification of 
Amendments shall be simple 
majority of votes cast. 
ARTICLE X 
— PUBLICATION 

j SECTION 1: CI. 1. The official 
newspaper of the Student 
Association shall be the 

. CURRENT SAUCE. A 

: representative from the 
CURRENT SAUCE shall 
attend all Student Senate 
meetings, and the minutes of 
each meeting shall be printed 
in the CURRENT SAUCE. 

■ SECTION 2: CI. 1. The staff of 
the CURRENT SAUCE shall 
be determined at the begin- 
ning of each semester the 

: frequency of publication and 
publication date, with the 
approval of the Student 
Publications Committee. 
CI. 2. Scholarship positions 

j on the CURRENT SAUCE will 
not exceed five full-time 
scholarships, including Editor 
and Business Manager. 

CI. 3. The POTPOURRI 
staff will receive not more 
than five full-time scholar- 
ships. 

CI. 4. The amount of money 
allocated from the respective 
publication agencies for the 
purpose of scholarships shall 
be determined at the begin- 
ning of each semester by the 
Student Finance Commission 
upon recommendation in 
budgets of the publications 
and cannot be changed during 
any one semester after the 
budgets have been approved. 
SECTION 3 : CI. 1. The Student 
Publications Committee shall 
nominate an Editor-in-Chief of 
the CURRENT SAUCE from a 



CURRENT SAUCE at least 
one semester prior to his 
selection. 

Q. 3. If no one files for the 
office of Editor-in-Chief who 
meets the qualifications, the 
Student Publications Com- 
mittee may select the best 
qualified candidate, with the 
approval of the Student 
Senate. 

CI. 4. Candidates aspiring to 
obtain the office of Editor-in- 
of the CURRENT 
SAUCE shall file a "notice of 
intention" with the Office of 
Vice President of Student 
Affairs, containing the name 
of the proposed business 
manager and the other most 
important staff members. The 
Committee shall determine 
whether or not each candidate 
is qualified to serve in the 
position to which he is ap- 
pointed. 

SECTION 4: CI. 1. In 
cooperation with the staff of 
the newspaper, the Editor-in- 
Chief shall direct the policies 
of his particular publication; 
he shall be directly respon- 
sible for its publication and its 
contents. 

CI. 2. The Editor shall be 
responsible also for main- 
taining a publication of the 
best possible quality and shall 
seek to protect the integrity of 
the University and the SGA 
while providing an adequate 
medium for the dissemination 
of student views. 



CI. 3. The Editor-in-Chief 
shall receive a full-time schol- 
arship as defined in this 
Constitution. 

SECTION 5: CI. 1. The 
Business Manager shall be a 
member of the Student Body. 
He shall have completed at 
least 45 semester hours, in- 
cluding some courses in ac- 
counting, and he must 
maintain at least a 2.0 average 
over all. 

CI. 2. He shall be responsible 
for the business aspects of the 
publication. He shall also file a 
proposed budget with the 
Student Finance Commission 
at the first of each semester. 
SECTION 6: CI. 1. The 
President of the University 
shall recommend each year, 
with the approval of the 
Student Publications Com- 
mittee, a member of the 
faculty to serve as advisor to 
the CURRENT SAUCE. He 
shall work closely with the 
various editors and shall give 
them advice and assistance in 
the production of the 
CURRENT SAUCE. 
SECTION 7: CI. 1. The 
CURRENT SAUCE is to be 
free of censorship. The editor 
or other staff members shall 
not be arbitrarily suspended 
because of student, faculty, 
administration, alumni, or 
community disapproval of 
editorial policy or content. 
The staff, however, shall 
conform to the editorial 
guidance of the Student 
Publications Committee. 

CI. 2. An editor or staff 
member may be removed 
from his office only by the 
Student Publications Com- 
mittee with the approval of the 
Student Senate. 
SECTION 8: Q. 1. The official 
year book of the SGA of NSU 
shall be the POTPOURRI. 
SECTION 9: CI. 1. The Student 
Publications Committee shall 



appoint an Editor-in-Chief of 
the POTPOURRI from a list of 
qualified candidates with the 
approval of the Student 
Senate. 

CI. 2. To be eligible for the 
editorship of the POT- 
POURRI, a candidate must 
have completed at least 45 
semester hours including 
some hours in magazine 
editing with at least a 2.0 over 
all average. He must have 
served on the POTPOURRI 
staff at least one semester 
prior to his appointment. 

CI. 3. If no one files for the 
office of Editor-in-Chief who 
meets the above 
qualifications, the Student 
Publications Committee may 
select the best qualified 
candidate with the approval of 
the Student Senate. 

CI. 4. Candidates aspiring to 
obtain the office of Editor-in- 
Chief of the POTPOURRI 
shall file a "notice of in- 
tention" with the chairman of 
the Student Publications 
Committee, containing the 
names of the more important 
staff members. The Com- 
mittee shall determine 
whether or not each candidate 
is qualified to serve in the 
position to which he is ap- 
pointed. 

Q. 5. The Editor-in-Chief of 
the POTPOURRI shall file a 
"notice of intention" with the 
chairman of the Student 
Publications Committee, 
containing the names of the 
more important staff mem- 
bers. The Committee shall 
determine whether or not each 
candidate is qualified to serve 
in the position to which he is 
appointed. 

CI. 5. The editor shall be 
responsible for filing a 
proposed budget with the 
Student Finance Commission 
at the first of each semester. 
SECTION 10: CI. 1. The 



College students name heroes 



Who do college students 
respect most ? Who are their 
heroes? 

A University of Florida 
professor recently posed these 
questions as a classroom 
assignment. 

Dr. William Goldhurst 
asked 100 sophomore 
humanities students at 



Gainsville, Fla., to name their 
heroes, applying the concept 
of "The Nine Worthies," a list 
of world leaders selected by 
medieval historians as the 
greatest heroes of all time. 
The students' selections are 
reported in the Autumn 1976 
issue of Horizon, the magazine 
of world history, art and 



culture. 

The students were asked to 
name outstanding people from 
any era so long as the 
nominees reflected values in 
which the students believed. 
The individuals receiving the 
greatest number of votes 
were, in sequential order, 
Martin Luther King, Jr., 




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Tuesday Dollar Night 



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Bill Cosby 
Raquel Welch 

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Woody Allen 
'LOVE & DEATH' 



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Wednesday & Thursday 
Buck Nights 



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Both Rated R 



Friday-Tuesday 



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ISOSCELES P0PSIGLE. This Band From Slidell Has 
packed Clubs Throughout South Louisiana. 

DON'T MISS IT!! THEY'RE DYNAMITE!! 



SAT. OCT. 9 - R0ADH0USE (After NSU Football Game) 

ATTENTION EACH MONDAY NIGHT: "FOOTBALL SPECIAL" 

Discounted Price 

WEEKNIGHTS DANCE TO OUR DISCO SOUNDS 
PLAY OUR NEW MACHINES: F00SBALL, PIN BALL, 

QUADRAPONG Hwy. 1 S. Bypass Phone 352-6026 



Henry Kissinger, John F. 
Kennedy and Abraham 
Lincoln. This group was 
followed by Winston Churchill, 
Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 
Albert Einstein, and Ralph 
Nader. The ninth named was 
Mao Tse-Tung. 

The reasons given by the 
students for selections were 
these- : Kin g died in a noble 
cause; Kissinger travels 
world-wide seeking peace; 
Kennedy advanced civil rights 
and aid to the elderly; Lincoln 
freed the slaves and 
preserved the Union; 
Roosevelt led the way out of 
the Great Depression; 
Churchill withstood the 
Nazies; Einstein added a new 
dimension to our un- 
derstanding of the universe; 
Ralph Nader protects the 
consumer from being ripped 
off by industry and big 
business; and Mao brought 
China into the twentieth 
century. 

To the students, leadership 
meant the ability to meet a 
great challenge, according to 
Dr. Goldhurst, an associate 
prfessor of English and The 
Humanities. 

The Horizon article points 
out that artists, composers, 
poets and thinkers were not 
overlooked by the students. 
Shakespeare, Beethoven and 
Picasso received about 10 
votes each. Darwin, Freud, 
Karl Marx, Socrates and 
Jesus were also among the 10 
precenters. Adolph Hitler 
received four votes. John 
Mitchell and Richard M. 
Nixon each received three. 



^resident of the University 
shall recommend each year, 
mih the approval of the 
Student Publications Com- 
mittee, a member of the 
faculty to serve as advisor to 
the POTPOURRI. 

ARTICLE XI — 
STUDENT BILL 
OF RIGHTS 
SECTION 1: The student has 
the right to petition the 
government for redress of 
grievance. 

SECTION 2. The student has 
the right to judicial due 
process, including a speedy 
trial, confrontation of the 
plaintiff or his witness, 
council, presumption of in- 
nocence, protection against 
cruel punishment, and appeal 
as defined in the NSU Code of 
Conduct. 

SECTION 3. The student has 
the right to bring suit within 
the regular judiciary struction 
for any violation of right 
guaranteed by the Student Bill 
of Rights or Student 
Regulations. 

SECTION 4. The student has 
the right not to be twice put in 
jeopardy for the same offense. 
SECTION 5. The student has 
the right to invite and hear 
any person of his choice on 
any subject of his choice as 
provided for in the original 
Handbook. 

SECTION 6. The student has 
the right to use campus 
facilities, subject to uniform 
regulations governing the 
facility. 

SECTION 7. The student has 
the right of assembly to 
demonstrate, inform, or 
protest, so long as the normal 
workings of the NSU Student 
Association are not disrupted. 
SECTION 8. The student has 
the right to be secure in his 
possessions against invasion 
of privacy, and unreasonable 
search and seizure. 



Three Columns 




Moore earns 
doctorate degree 

Mrs. Dean F. Moore, 
assistant professor in the 
Department of Sociology and 
Social Work has fulfilled all 
requirements for the doc- 
torate degree in sociology. 

Mrs. Moore will be awarded 
the doctorate from the 
Department of Sociology and 
Rural Sociology at LSU during 
winter commencement 
exercises. Dec. 21. 

The assistant professor's 
dissertation was entitled "A 
Comparision of LSU Femal? 
Graduates, 1930 to 1960; A 
Study of Changing Roles and 
Alienation." 

Mrs. Moore, who was 
recently notified of her in- 
clusion in the 10th edition of 
Who's Who in American 
Women, will present a paper 
based on her disseration study 
at a meeting of the Mid) South 
Sociological Association in 
Monroe Nov. 4-6. Her paper is 
entitled "World War U as 
Impetus for Changing Life 
Styles, Myth or Reality," It 
will be presented during a 
section on sex roles. 

Mrs. Moore is a former 
news and women's editor for 
KWKH - Radio and KTBS-TV 
station in Shreveport. She also 
served as women's editor for 
WHBC in Canton, Ohio, and 
was a free lance broadcaster 
in Cleveland and Canton. 

Artists 

display works 

Due to the rapid growth of 
the Northwestern State 
University Art Department, 
graduate students have 
started a group show of their 
works. 

The exhibits, being 
displayed at the A. A. 
Fredericks Fine Arts Gallery, 
will introduce the works of the 
graduate students to the 
undergraduate Art majors, 
and the rest of the university. 

The display which started 
Sept. 22, is expected to last 
through October 1. 

On display at the gallery are 
ceramics, photography, 
painting, sculpture, print- 
making and advertising work. 
Gallery hours from Monday to 
Friday are 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

SAM members 
plan trip 

Six members of NSU's 
chapter of the Society for the 
Advancement of Management 
will participate Oct. 1-3 at 
Dallas in the Students Life 
Insurance Company. 

Students in Free Enterprise 
in a competitive program for 
business students from more 
than 20 colleges and univer- 
sities in a five state area. 

The competition in Dallas is 
intended to encourage 
business students to develop 
innovative and effective 
programs for projecting the 
positive side of our free en- 
terprise system on campus 
and in the community. 

The program is organized 
and administered by National 
Leadership Methods in 
cooperation with the public 
relations department of 
Southwestern Life Insurance 
Company. 

SAM offices from NSU who 
will participate in the fall 
program in Dallas include 
president Carl Riche, 



secretary Keith Fontenot, 
treasurer David Harding, 
membership chairman Steve 
Hudson, publicity chairman 
Timothy Bonnette, and 
program chairman Joe Lang. 

Also attending the orien- 
tation meeting will be Dr. 
Marie Burkhead, sponsor, and 
Dr. Rogert Best, adviser , 
from the university's College 
of Business. 

The competition will run 
from early fall through 
March. Each school will be 
expected to submit a written 
report describing in detail its 
program for stimulating a 
better free enterprise 
system. 

On April 2, three 
representatives from each 
school will be invited back to 
Dallas for a judging session, 
at which time the students will 
be given an opportunity to 
summarize and highlight their 
accomplishments in a 10 
minute oral presentation. 

Townsend 

to present paper 

Dr. David Townsend, dean 
of the College of Business will 
present a paper next month at 
the fourth annual conference 
of the Academy of Louisiana 
Economists. 

The conference is scheduled 
for Oct. 7-8 on the campus of 
Louisisiana State University 
in Baton Rouge. 

Townsend's paper is entitled 
"A Monetarist Revision of 
Monetary System 
Mechanics." He will make his 
presentation at 9:30 a. m. on 
Oct. 8 to open the morning 
session. 

The NSU professor and dean 
has been on the university- 
faculty since 1963. He for- 
merly served as a visting 
economist to the Board of 
Governors of the Federal 
Reserve System in 
Washington, D.C. and has 
previous teaching experience 
at the University of Texas, 
Stephen F. Austin, the 
University of Houston and 
LSU. 

Townsend earned the B.A. 
degree in economics from 
Cornell College in Iowa, the 
M.A. degree in economics 
from the University of 
Michigan and the Ph.D. 
degree in economics and 
finance from LSU. 

Fred M. Wright of LSU is 
president of the Acadmey of 
Louisiana Economists. 
Chairman of the fourth annual 
conference is Lamar Jones of 
LSU. 

ROTC cadets 
earn honors 



Four senior cadets in the 
Reserve Officers Training 
Crops have been recognized 
by the university's Depart- 
ment of Military Science as 
distinguished military 
students. 

Selected for the honor were 
Joel Wayne McCart, William 
Irl Nipp, Jr., Timothy Boyd 
O'Neal Henderson Trent rfl. 

The cadeb ranked in the 
upper third of their ROTC 
class academically and the 
upper half of the entire senior 
class academically. Their 
selection was also based on 



When vou think 
of menswear.... 
think of £ 



Cardan's 



Located next to Broadmoor Shopping Center 



outstanding leadership 
qualities. 

NSU's honorees w e r t 
recommended for the Dnjj 
awards by Lt. Col. Paul r 
Reed, professor of military 
science and director of ROTc 
Their selection was approv e j 
by president Arnold r 
Kilpa trick. 

Professor 
writes book 



Dr. Joey L. Dillard is the 
author of a book entitled 
"Black Names" in which he 
investigat3s the patterns of 
name fiving in Black societies 
from West Africa to Puerto 
Rico, to the Unitied States. 

Dillard, assistant professor 
of English, a nationally, 
recognized authority in the 
field of linguistics, also shows 
in his book how the practices 
have influenced standard 
English today. 

In a section on music, for 
example, Dillard shows hoiw 
name giving practices such as 
"Jelly Roll" Morton and Louis 
"Satchomo" Armstrong 
paved the way for Charlie 
"Bird" Parker and Billie 
"Lady" Holiday and even- 
tually for "The Beatles" or 
"The Rolling Stones." 

Even the terms "jazz" and 
"rock and roll" have origins in 
the Black Creole, a dialect 
created by the fusion of dif- 
fering languages and cultures. 



Slave names, Dillard 
writers, were often not 
corruptions of classical names 
or whimsical inventions of 
owners but were frequently 
reflections of a West African 
practice of naming children The 



l: 



by 

A little 
elect rich 
lemoved 
cement po 
light a 
found was 
{p cement 
lludents oi 
There h 
jme capsi 
at c 
tamp us. J 
(nance de 
oldest of 
November 
(reserved 
Shakespea 
jream." 1 
ear the fi 
fees in si 
fores. 
"Imagini 
I Oh boy, 
ie found i 
nkl have 
■claimed 
The othe 
nnd in tl 
UdwellHi 
(the "Ci 
Wdual sL 
raduate oi 
The "Cur 
,1915 and 
oeet of pap 
icture on 
lining the 

fating 



] 



i 

se< 

according to the day of the languish 



week upon which they were 
born. 

For example, a name such 
as Squash probably came 
from Quashee (Sunday) and 
Phoebe, rather than a 
classical influence from Phiba 
or Phibbi (Friday y. 



U Friday 
Kb Audit 
loseph F 
tmedical 
kginia Sc 
«as the st 
5U. 

Dr. Fletcl 
Iks on s< 
eluding hi 



Cuffee and such variants as 
Cuff, Cuffee and Cuffie come 
from the practicw of naming a 
child after a day of the week, 
and there are some 23 
examples of such surnames in 
the Manhattan telephone 
directory today. 

Challenging the notion that 
freed slaves merelyadopted 
the family name of the 
previous owner, he writes, 
"But the more independent 
ex-slaves very quickly 
established a pattern later to 
become the hallmark of Black 
military in names. Ex-slaves 
with a greater sense of u> 
dependence might folio* I 
different patterns. Shipping 
magnate Paul Cuffee (once 
known as Cuffee Slocum, 
when owned by a man named 
Slocum) is an outstanding 
example of how day names 
became surnames in some 
cases." 

Other books published W 
Dillard include "Black 
English" "Perspectives oo 
Black English," and "All | 
American English." He has I 
also written numerous article' | 
for professional journals. 



NSU will 
finer Lou 

totericks, 
ttDDodd 
Dodd wil 
Dtribution 
'his cont 
"BUlDodc 
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In Zi 




CHEV. INC 

PRESENTS 

THE NEW 1977 
0HEVR0LETS 

SEPT. 30, 1976 

TEXAS AT THIRD 
NATCHIT OCHES , LA. 352-233^ 



ON, 
tin Wil 
vis wil 

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c holl s | 

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Vnor 
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formal 



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leadership 



URRENT SAUCE 



Vol. LXIV, No. 5 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 



NATCHITOCHES. LOUISIANA 



October 5. 1976 



lorees Wer{ 
for the DMs 
Col. Paul » 

3r of militjj^ 

ector of Roxc 
was approve 

; Arnold r 



Three Time Capsules found 



>r 
10k 

Dillard is the 
book entitled 
i" in which he 
te patterns of 
Black societies 
rica to Puerto 
litied States. 

itant professor 
a nationally, 
thority in the 
ics, also shows 
v the practices 
:ed standard 



on music, for 
rd shows hoiw 
actices such as 
)rton and Louis 
Armstrong 
y for Charlie 
;r and BilUe 
ay and even- 
le Beatles" or 
tones." 

ms "jazz" and 
have origins in 
ole, a dialect 
fusion of dif- 
s and cultures. 

les, Dillard 
e often not 
classical names 
inventions of 
ere frequently 
i West African 
ming children 
he day of the 
ich they were 



a name such 
obably came 
(Sunday) and 
er than a 
ce from Phiba 
ayy. 



by Muffetl Richardson 

A little over two weeks ago an NSU 
(Jectrician, Mr. Lester Burleson, 
(emoved the bronze plaque from a 
cement post to check the inner wiring of 
I light fixture. What Mr. Burleson 
found was a small copper box encased 
in cement planted over 60 years ago by 
indents of the "Normal." 

There had been no hint that three 
jme capsules were planted in cement 
posts at central locations across the 
tampus. Mr. Bill Carter of the main- 
Knance department explained that the 
West of the three dated back to 
November, 1914. It held a perfectly 
preserved play program of 
Jiakespeare's "Midsummer Night's 
pream." The box was found in a post 
iear the front gate and was 2x5x2 in- 
dies in size, as were the other two 
dies. 

"Imagine how we felt when we found 
I Oh boy, was it exciting! ... And then 
k found another one. I just wish we 
gold have gotten more photographs," 
■claimed Mr. Carter. 
The other two time capsules were 
wnd in the posts between Roy and 
ildwell Halls. They contained an issue 
( the "Current Sauce" and an in- 
Ividual slip of paper for each 1915 
raduate of the Normal. 
The "Current Sauce" was dated April 
,1915 and consisted of one long slim 
beet of paper with the graduating class 
Icture on the top. The capsule con- 
ning the paper was not sealed 



against damp air as the older box was, 
so the paper was not as well preserved. 

On each slip of paper was a 
graduate's signature and his comment 
about graduating. One young lady said, 
"T'was no tears on leaving the Nor- 



mal," while another said that, "I thot 
(sic) I would be happy upon 
graduating, but I have such a lump in 
my throat it could choke me." 

On the other side of the paper slips 
were notations, such as "best athlete," 







J CURREN 


T SAUCE 


: 1 If 1 *" 










fifes** 



EXTRA, EXTRA ! — This issue of Current Sauce, dated May 20, 
1915, was found in one of the three time capsules unearthed a 
couple of weeks ago. As you can tell the paper is somewhat 
damaged due to moisture leak in the capsule. All of the items 
found in the capsules are now on display in the La. Room in the 
Watson Library. 



tetinguished Lecture Series 



Fletcher slated for lecture 



by STAN TYLER 
The second lecture in the 
languished Lecture Series will be 
i Friday, October 8, 1976 in the Fine 
its Auditorium at 9:00 a.m. Dr. 
Meph Fletcher, professor of 
llnedical ethics at the University of 
kgtnia School of Medicine, will ad- 
Ms the student body and faculty of 
B. 

fc. Fletcher is the author of many 
4s on social and medical ethics, 
eluding his recent, "The Ethics of 



ch variants as 
d Cuffie come 
w of naming a 
y of the week, 
re some 23 
h surnames in 
n telephone 



le notion that 
lerelyadopted 
ame of the 
, he writes, 

independent 
ry quickly 
ittern later to 
nark of Black 
es. Ex-slaves 
sense of in - 
light folio* 
ns. Shipping 
Cuffee (once 
fee Slocum, 
a man named 

outstanding 
i day name* 
les in some 



published W 
ide "Black 
•spectives * 
," and "AH 
ish." He bfl* 
lerous article 1 
journals. 



Genetic Control: Ending Reproductive 
Roulette." Dr. Fletcher received the 
Humanist of the Year Award in 1974. 

Dr. Fletcher is also an ordained 
minister and for many years worked as 
a clergyman. He then began his career 
as a professor and lecturer. He has 
lectured at some of the most 
prestegious colleges in America, such 
as Harvard. 

Dr. Fletcher is also listed in Who's 
Who in America, 1976. His ac- 
complishments would take up too much 



Jill Dodd Day planned ; 
Wis, Wilson to perform 



NSU will pay tribute to Bill Dodd, a 
n&er Louisiana politician, and A.A. 
Mericks, a former NSU president on 

Dodd Day" this Saturday. 
Dodd will be recognized for his 
Dtribution to the state and Fredericks 
'his contribution to the university. 
"BUI Dodd Day" will be celebrated in 
*> phases. The first phase will take 
Kt in Zwolle where a parade, a 



52-2331 




barbecue, and several other activities 
are being staged. Former Governor 
and Mrs. Jimmy Davis and a host of 
Dodd's friends will be present at these 
festivities. 

After the celebration in Zwolle, the 
group will journey to NSU for phase 
two. A reception in honor of Fredericks 
and Dodd will be held in the Student 
Union ballroom. 

During the half time activities of the 
NSU-Nicholls game a presentation will 
be made to Dodd and to Fredericks' 
wife. 

Former Governor Jimmy Davis and 
his wife, and the Demon marching 
band will perform after the presen- 
tation for half time enjoyment ac- 
cording to Dr. C.B. Ellis, director of 
External Affairs. 

Saturday evening will begin with a 45 
minute performance by the famed 
Ca jun comedian Justin Wilson at 6 : 30 p. 
m. in Turpin Stadium. 



space to list since he has done so much 
in his lifetime. He was quoted as 
saying, "My overall principle has been 
to be honest with myself, as the 
necessary basis of honesty with others. 
As a humanist, putting the welfare of 
persons before things or abstractions. I 
have rejected the notion that any moral 
principle has as much claim on my 
actions as human needs. As ideals or 
standards I've found the whole problem 
of the ethical life illuminated by the 
Christian notion of loving concern and 
the scientific discipline of honest 
thinking and communication. And as 
for ultimate things like faith in God, I 
agree with Kant, that the divine is 
essentially unknowable and any claim 
to have that knowledge is pretentious." 

Dr. Fletcher has done much work in 
voluntary capacities. He believes in life 
and the living being. The pursuit of 
happiness has been stressed in many of 
his articles and publications. He 
believes that children that are mentally 
retarded and with a low IQ still are 
happy and can have fun. 

Many classes in psychology use his 
works as reading material and lecture 
material. His writings and teachings 
are used extensively. 



Jj-SON, DAVIS TEAM UP - 
j'tin Wilson and Gov. Jimmie 
^js will team up to perform 
I Joe half time of the NSU- 
^olls game. Wilson is well 
>n for his "cajun" humor, 
? has delighted audiences all 
L 6r the south with his jokes, 
jj's, Louisiana's signing 
jernor will also perform, 
jmpanied by his wife. The 
i£°rmances will be in con- 
^ion with "Bill Dodd Day." 




Currently 



Tuesday, Oct. 5 
SGA Runoffs 
2nd Floor of Student Union 
"A Marriage Proposal" 
Natchitoches — 10 : 30 p.m. 
"Accident" 
Rapides — 10:30 p.m. 
Wednesday, Oct. 6 
7:30 p.m. 
Movie — "Slaughterhouse 5" 
Arts & Science Auditorium 
IDs required 
"Marriage Proposal" 
Varnado — 10:30 p. m. 

"Accident" 
Louisiana — 10:30 p. m. 

Thursday, Oct. 7 
"A Marriage Proposal" 
Louisiana — 10:30 p.m. 

"Accident" 
Varnado — 10:30 p.m. 
Friday, Oct. 8 
Last Date to Drop Classes 
Without Penalty 
Dr. Joseph Fletcher 
Distinguished Lecturer 
9 a.m. Fine Arts Aud. 



"best dancer," and "most beautiful 
eyes." Also included in this time 
capsule was one long list of the entire 
graduating class of 87 students signed 
by the president of the university and 
governor of the state. 

"They went to a lot of trouble to do it, 
whoever did it. I think it's wonderful," 
commented Mr. Carter about the 
discovery. 

Mr. Carter also stated, "I think it 
would be very nice if the students would 
reciprocate and fill the same boxes with 
bicentennial information. We could use 
the same boxes and put them back into 
the same posts. Those cement columns 
will be there for — oh, I don't know how 
long and the bicentennial year would be 
an excellent year to do something." 



The time capsules will be exhibited 
during Homecoming Week in the 
Student Union and will then be moved 
to the Louisiana Room for display. 

Here's pie 
in your eye! 

How would you like a chance to see 
pie on the face of your favorite teacher 
or student on campus? 

Kappa Alpha Order will hold "KA Hit 
Day" complete with contracts, hit men 
and pies. 

Students can "put out a contract" on 
any teacher or student. Thursday, Oct. 
21 will be hit day. 

A contract will cost $5 and as many as 

three persons can purchase a single 
contract. Contracts will be on sale from 
today through October 19 in the Student 
Union Lobby from 8 a. m. to 1 p. m. 
At each "hit" there will be a crew 
consisting of clean-up men, camera 
men, and of course, — the Hit Man! 

Now's your chance to "do away with" 
that person you really like. 

March 
Arrested 

Christine Ann March, an assistant 
professor in the Home Economics 
Department has been arrested on 
federal charges of possession of 263 
pounds of marijuana with intent to sell. 

Miss March was arrested last week 
on a warrant from U.S. District Court in 
Eastern Illinois, her home state. 

She posted a $10,000 bond and is to be 
arraigned in Illinois. 

The indictment charges that the first 
year teacher, "Knowingly and in- 
tentionally did possess with intent to 
distribute and dispense a controlled 
substance." 

Miss March, was a Dean's List 
student and recipient of two state 
scholarships while attending Southern 
Illinois University. She has traveled to 
clothing markets in Paris and Madrid, 
and has attended the annual boutique 
shows in New York. She teaches 
courses in clothing and textiles. 

According to the indictment the 
alleged offense occurred Jan. 27 in 
Jackson County, 111. 

No other details are available. 



Thursday, Oct 7 
Movie — "Slaughter house-5" 
Arts & Science Auditorium 
IDs required 
Saturday, Oct. 9 
NSU vs. La. Tech in tennis 
10 a. m. Tennis Courts 
Bill Dodd Day 
Justin Wilson 
6:30 p.m. Turpin Stadium 

Demons vs Nicholls 
7 : 30 p. m. Turpin Stadium 

Hot Sauce 

Why doesn't Dr. Galloway have a 
parking sticker for his car? 

He does. 

Why do the fraternities get special 
areas to sit in at the football games and 
everyone else gets pot luck? 




THAT MICROPHONE FASCINATES ME - Ethma Odom was 
on campus last week and was presented with the "Nth" Degree, 
by President Arnold Kilpatrick. Pictured with Mrs. Odom is 
Tommy Whitehead who seems to be very interested in the 
microphone that Mrs. Odom is using. 

Odom given award 



Ethma Odom, the talk show hostess 
for KALB-TV Channel 5's program The 
Ethma Odom Show, was presented the 
Nth Degree by President Arnold R. 
Kilpatrick last Thursday for her many 
contributions to NSU. 

Mrs. Odom, who attended NSU from 
1948-50, is one of the few people who has 
been honored with the award of 
recognition. 

During her visit Mrs. Odom toured 
the campus visiting the Rec complex 
and the stables, talked with the 
television classes, and lunched with the 
Kilpa tricks. She visited with Mrs. Mary 
L. Posey's kindergarten class. 



In her talk with the television classes, 
Mrs. Odom spoke of how she began 
almost 17 years ago in the talk show 
business. She acquainted the classes 
with her technique of drawing people 
into the interview and spoke of some of 
the unusual and funny incidents which 
have happened on her program. 

NSU currently has two regular ap- 
pearances made on Mrs. Odom's 
show— one originates out of the music 
department and the second is a series of 
interviews with Mrs. Mary Posey on the 
upbringing of small children. 

Accompanying Mrs. Odom on her 
visit to NSU were her husband Bill and 
her daughter Budda. 



SGA announces winners 



With less than 500 people voting last 
Tuesday, six of the SGA senatorial 
positions were filled and there will be a 
runoff for two of the positions. 

Elected to serve in the senate were 
Charles Reed, freshman senator; 
Roger Adams and Rhonda Baham, 
sophomore senators; John Breland and 
David McKinney, junior senators; and 
Rodney Wise, Senior senator. 

Runoffs will be held for the freshman 



senator and the senior senatcr 
positions. Pitty Cathey, David Pierson 
and Billy Ray Gingles are contenders 
for the freshman position, and Marvin 
Roque and Debbie Mayeux are vying 
for the remaining senior senator 
position. 

The runoff election will be held today 
in conjunction with SGA constitutional 
election. The polls will be open from 8 
a.m. to 7 p.m. and IDs are required to 
enable one to vote. 




I 



BUYING VOTES? — John McKellar checks Danny Dyess' I. 
card, as Stan Haynes stares at the ceiling. 



D. 



For the same reason the band plays 
the Alma Mater before every home 
football game — tradition. This 
practice isn't restricted just to Nor- 
thwestern. It is a tradition at most 
universities to have certain areas 
reserved for fraternity members to sit. 

Will the band start playing to both 
sides of the field at future football 
games? 

According to Dr. Jerry Payne, Band 
Director, "Yes, in the future we plan to 
perform at least one feature number to 
the student side of the field at half 
time." 

Payne added that the band was 
planning to attend the La. Tech game in 
Shreveport and will perform at half 
time. 

Why wasn't our new expensive 
stadium made "cricket proof?" 

The crickets are not just found in our 
"new, expensive stadium; " they are all 
over campus. It is our understanding 
that the crickets are migrating through 
our area and it appears that they like 
everyone else in Natchitoches wanted 



to see the Demons "jump" all over 
Delta State. The cricket problem should 
be solved as soon as a good cold front 
comes through. 



The Student Government Association 
has announced a student referendum in 
which students will be able to vote as to 
whether they would like to raise student 
fees to fund two separate agencies. 

Two propositions are to be con- 
sidered. 

Proposition one would increase 
student fee assessments by $.25 per 
semester to fund a cheerleader agency 
account for use by the NSU 
Cheerleaders. 

Proposition 2 would increase the 
student fee assessments for KNWD-FM 
to $2.00 per semester. 

The propositions will be considered 
by students on Oct. 27. 



Page 2 CURRENT SAUCE October 5, 1976 



What do you think? 



Co 's Corner 



Northwestern, in its con- 
tinuing search for fame and 
students, has an unique op- 
portunity for a major work of 
art to be on this very campus 
in Natchitoches, La. 

In a recent Time magazine, 
an entire article and picture 
were devoted to Christo 
Javacheff (Sept. 20, 1976) who 
has constructed a 24 ^ mile 
Running Fence consisting of 
nylon strung between steel 
posts along the California 
countryside. 

In a moment of true artistic 
pride and Demon spirit, a 
press conference should be 
called and an announcement 
. made that the remains of the 
i burned-out Bienville Dining 
Hall is now Burned Dinner. 
With the small expenditure for 
posts and rope to surround the 
object d'art, the only other 
costs would be several small 
signs labelling the project. 
... Just think of the publicity 
. that could be generated from 
these remains of the early 
summer fire which doesn't 
seem like it will ever be 
cleared away because of the 
high costs in- volved. So, 
utilize this heap of rubbish as 
a tourist at- traction! ! ! ! 

After several objects in a 
recent art show on the NSU 
campus(i.e. a paper lantern 
like one made in kin- 
dergartens all over the 
country and two pages ripped 
out of a book and then 
smeared with crayons) were 



given recognition as art, 
certainly this massive work of 
concrete and steel should 
qualify as art. 

In the Time article 
Javacheff said, "(A) Work of 
art must be unusable," By this 
criteria and the fact we can't 
seem to get rid of the ruins, 
let's just accept them as art 
and make it an addition to our 
campus. 

Something controversial 
has finally happened this 
semester at NSU ! The Student 
Government Association has 
approved a bill calling for a 
student referendum to raise 
KNWD's fees from $.50 to 
12.00. 

The issue sparked the 
liveliest debate of the 
semester at last weeks 
regular Senate meeting. After 
much argument and debate, a 
vote was taken and the bill 
failed by two votes to get the 
necessary two-thirds majority 
vote of the Senate. 

Amidst the confusion 
following the vote, Senate 
Chairman Bob Ryder, moved 
to reconsider the bill. This was 
possible because Ryder had 
not voted the first time the bill 
came up. After bis motion 
passed, there was still more 
debate, with Clinton Davis, 
David Walker Bob Ryder and 
Danny Dyess all arguing 
strongly in favor of the bill. 
Again the question was called 
and again the bill failed, this 



time by only one vote. (Ryder 
voted this time.) 

The next day it was an- 
nounced that there would be a 
special meeting of the Senate 
on Wednesday to reconsider 
the bill again. 

At this meeting it was ap- 
parent that the pro-KNWD 
forces had done their 
homework. The bill passed in 
near record time, with no 
debate. 

This time however, Danny 
Dyess changed his vote, and 
voted "no." Dyess had 
strongly supported KNWD at 
the first meeting and ap- 
parently was pressured by 
some outside force to change 
his vote. 

In a related development, 
last years SGA President, 
Greg Ross circulated a 
petition to get signatures of 
people who were opposed to 
the referendum. Ross is 
Danny Dyess' roommate. 

Some of the 65 people who 
signed the petition were asked 
why they signed it. Their 
answers were interesting: 

"I was drunk when Greg 
asked me" 

"I don't like the music they 
Play." 

"I was told that if I put my 
name on the petition it would 
help keep SGA from giving 
KNWD more money." 

"I signed it because Greg 
told me to." 

SGA does not have the 
authority to raise anyone's 



fees, including KNWD's. The 
only thing they can do is call a 
referendum to allow students 
to decide if they want to raise 
the fees. 

Apparently, Greg Ross is 
trying to influence the votes 
that some senators cast. He 
may have forgotten that all 
former SGA Presidents are 
ex-officio members of the 
Senate. As a former president 
he has the right to attend 
meetings and voice his 
opinions in front of everyone, 
where his remarks go on 
record. Ross has not chosen to 
attend any meetings. 

It appears that Ross is 
taking a more active role in 
student government this year 
than he did last year as 
president. Of the nine senate 
bills voted on so far this year, 
Ross has actively opposed at 
least two. Nine bills and 
several resolutions have been 
considered after only five 
weeks this semester. Last 
years SGA, under Ross' ad- 
ministration, acted on only 
three regular bills. 

Although he has opposed 
some of the bills this year, 
Ross has admitted that he 
supports the new, revised 
constitution. In a conversation 
with Clinton Davis and Bob 
Ryder, some weeks ago, he 
admitted, "You did a pretty 
good job on the constitution; I 
would never have thought to 
combine offices the way you 
did. 



I am back again this week 
from my short, unexpected 

vacation. I was surprised 
when I took a look at page two 
last week and found there was 

to be no "Co's Corner"; in 
fact, there was not to be even a 
"Co's inch." 

I was not too upset since I 
had no idea what in the world I 

was going to say. (At times I 
still wonder what I am going 
to write for others to read.) 

I guess every one has 
noticed that the sun seems to 
be setting earlier every 

evening and the nights and 
early mornings are getting 
cooler. Autumn seems to have 

crept onto the NSU campus 
and is to be here for a three 
month visit. 

Now that autumn is here 
and the nights are getting 
cooler, everyone should be 

getting tnat football game 
fever. Football game fever is 
that disease that descends on 
a college and the students can 

only get relief from it by at- 
tending a home football game 
and cheering their hearts and 
lungs out for their team. 



Football fever used to be 
highly contagious at one time. 
People were known to be 
quietly sitting in the stands 
watching a fairly interesting 
game when the person beside 
them would start yelling 
"Go!Go!Go!" at the top of his 
lungs. 




GO 



Suddenly, they noticed that 
they had risen to their feet and 
were chanting in unison with 
that fellow beside them. And 
the disease went on down the 
line until the whole stadium 
was filled with the one voice 
saying, "GO" repeatedly. 

True, those were the good 
old days, but I bet the same 
could happen on this campus if 
we just gave it "the good old 
college try." 



Get Involved 

Too many times I have 
heard people on this campus 
say, "What can I do to get 
involved?" There are quite a 
few organizations on campus 
you can get involved in. One 
such group is the Student 
Governing Board. 

The SUGB is a diversified 
organization made up of an 
executive board, 9 
representatives-at-large 
(seven elected by the student 
body and two appointed by the 
SGA), seven committee 
chairmen, and the committee 
members. 

Each committee (Big Name 
entertainment, hospitality, 
music and films, publicity, 
fine arts, coffeehouse, and 
decorations) takes application 
for membership. There is no 
deadline for applying for a 
committee; each is always 
open and more than happy to 
have additional members. 

Notice, each committee 
encompasses a different area 
of interest. Each is designed to 
plan a program of events and 
activities which will please the 



student* 
only w ^ 



majority of 
campus. The 
accomplish this goal is to^ 
a representative con^ The Thet 
which cannot be achj« m Omega 
without members. ^ attend( 

Committee membe r| [/wisiana « 
gives you a chance to qj IP M onroe . 
others who may have simj Brothers 
interests to yours. A j^peeting 
that committee memberj Robinson, 
is the opportunity to meet| Jerome Fi 
artists and performers , tfarvin 
appear here. jijchardsor 

Now, I am not saying , f* * 5 '. 
. . ' r« I Aapters t 

you have to go out and fa c 

T^Tf" * " ^ling 1 

y fi, you r antt °Rho °mej 

involved and see how «* „ 

^ Tau-Mor 
get done on campus in, 1 n . N 

area, go by Room 214 g 

Student Union and fill „ Gr J m ^J[ 1 

committee application/" 6 

understand that the SUGB j,, 

especially looking for * * 

to join the Decoraa, JL^. Ml 

Committee which recen ^j, saH 

received a new chairmaa 1 ^^ , 

There is nothing to 1<J their annul 
applying and there is pleat) ^ * 
be gained. No one is just g« chitoches 
to walk up to you out of | to suppoti 
clear blue and say, "I *, giving con 
you to work with t^tos 
Sometimes, you have to 
them know you are there, 



r 



SGA at a glance 



Readers comment on issues 



Dear Editor; 

I would like to thank all who 
voted and elected me to the 
position of sophomore class 
senator. I want to especially 
thank those who helped me in 
my campaign. 

We, as students, do have 
problems at NSU. They range 
from inefficient lighting at 
night to lack of parking 
spaces, and lack of concern 
for the student's welfare as a 
whole. 

. I know I am only one 
student, but with cooperation 
and a zeal to get things done, 
we can have a better NSU. As 
for myself, I intend to do my 
part 

Sincerely, 
Roger D.Adams 



Dear Editor: 

I have been here three and 
one-half years and haven't 
bitched yet, but here it is. 

Last Tuesday and Wed- 
nesday night, the SUGB 
presented for the student's 
enjoyment the movie "The 
Reincarnation of Peter 
Proud." Since the film 
committee has been getting 
excellent films lately (where 
are the concerts?) the 
auditorium was crowded with 
students anxiously waiting to 
spend a quiet evening at the 
movies. 

Here is where the bitching 
comes in. Why was it that the 
blacks in the rear sections of 



the auditorium would never 
shut up? Was it that they 
couldn't understand what was 
happening in the show? Were 
the sex scenes so horribly 
shocking that it shook them up 
and made them uneasy? (I 
seem to doubt that!) 

I agree that the blacks were 
not the only ones making 
noise, but they were the ones 
constantly making noise. Sure 
I believe in laughing when 
something is funny and even 
shrieking a time or two when 
something is scary, but not 
continuous talking, gigling, 
and laughing! If they didn't 
want to listen to the show, they 
could have at least had the 
courtesy and decency to let 
the others who did want to 
watch the film watch it. The 
admission by an ID could not 
allow someone or a group ruin 
the others good time because 
they paid just as much 
(probably more) man those 
disturbers for that card. 

One thing I can't stand and 
that is being in a room full of 
screaming kids. That is 
exactly what this group 
reminded me of. They showed 
an excessive amount of im- 
maturity and were grossly 
disrespectful of the others in 
the audience. 

The film committee has 
done an excellent job in 
selecting films that the 
students enjoy. I enjoyed 
"Peter Proud" tremendously 
(what I could hear of it). 
However, I feel that more 
respect and more maturity 



needs to 
future. 



be shown in the 
Concerned Student 



Dear Editor: 

On Sept. 29, the Student 
Senate met in a special 
meeting to decide whether or 
not to call a student 
referendum to determine if 
the students want to raise 
KNWD's student assessment 
fee from $.50 to $2.00. 

The bill was originally 
considered at the regular 
Senate meeting on Monday, 
Sept.27. At that time the bill 
failed to pass by one vote. On 
Sept. 29 the bill passed 11-3. 

During the past few days 
many of the facts surronding 
this issue have been 
misrepresented by certain 
people. 

In an effort to "pressure" 
certain senators, last year's 
SGA President circulated an 
"anti-KNWD" which was 
eventually signed by 65 
students. The petition stated 
that the undersigned students 
were against the Senate 
calling a referendum. Some of 
these persons signed the 
petition because they were 
told that the petition would 
"stop the Senate from giving a 
fee increase to KNWD." This 
is not true. 

The Senate cannot "give" a 
fee increase to anyone, they 
can only call for a student 
referendum to see if the 
students want one. 



EVERYBODY NEEDS A GANG! 

Maybe you think you don't, but well 
bet you do— no man is an island! 

Maybe we could be that gang. 

Here's the story .... 



INVOLVEMENT 
Mo rWZitJ^ I 





HAVE WE GOTTA DEAL FOR YOU 

You have the capacity to lead 
others -we have the capacity to 
develop it. 

You have a great friendship 

to share— we have the opportunity 

to share It. 

You have the potential to enrich 
the lives of others— we have the 
potential to develop it. 

The leadership, friendship and 
service you begin with us will take 
the rest of your life to finish. 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA 
NATIONAL SERVICE 
FRATERNITY 



FOUNDED IN 1925- 
Just slightly ahead of our time- 
Through our emphasis on service, we 
stressed involvement with people- 
before involvement was popular. 

Through our open membership 
policy, we accepted all people as 
they were -before acceptance 
was popular. 

Through our no hazing policy, we 
emphasized human dignity- before 
human dignity was popular. 




OPEN MEETING: WEDNESDAY , OO. 6. 
TIME : 7:00 PM 

PLACE : STL'DENT IT.' ION, ROOM 321 
EVERBODY'S GOT TO HAVE A GANG . 
CAN UE BE YOl'RS? 



The reason we supported the 
fee increase referendum is 
because we felt that the issue 
needed to be settled once and 
for all— by the students. 

Most, if not all, of KNWD's 
equipment is damaged or 
broken. The transmitter needs 
to be moved to a location 
where it will not interfere with 
T.V. sets on campus. KNWD 
still owes SGA $5,250. 

These things cost money- 
money that KNWD doesn't 
have. 

The radio station cannot 
continue to operate under the 
present conditions. A vote 
against the referendum would 
be the equivalent of "pulling 
the plug on KNWD." If the 
station is forced to close down, 
and it will be if they don't get 
more money, then SGA, and 
the students are out $5,250. 

This semester KNWD has 
introduced a totally new 
format, one which appeals to a 
broad cross-section of the 
students on campus. They are 
not playing "Acid Rock 
Music." 

The issue at hand here is— 
Do we want a radio station or 
not? We felt that the issue was 
much too important to let it 
die in the Senate, without the 
students having an op- 
portunity to decide if they 
want KNWD to continue 
broadcasting. 

KNWD has improved a lot 
over last semester, and it took 
a lot of hard work. (Unpaid 
work at that) With the fee 
increase they can buy the 
equipment, restore good T.V. 
reception, pay back SGA 
immediately, and make the 
changes needed to get even 
better. 

Without the increase we all 
lose something. 

Sincerely, 
David Walker 
SGA Vice President 1 
Bob Ryder 
SGA Senate Chairman 



The Senate of Northwestern 
was called to order at 6:39 
p.m. Sept. 27 by Bob Ryder. 
, Absent were Lynch and Boyd. 

Minutes were amended to 
include Mary Pat Baldridge 
and Shasta Shattinger on the 
Student Services Committee. 

OLD BUSINESS 

Pittard discussed Senator 
pictures. Walker announced 
that they would be taken 
'between 2:00 and 4:00 
■Tuesday. C. Davis read the 
budget, McKellar reported on 
SUGB. 

NEW BUSINESS 

C. Davis appointed Joani 
Rosenthal as chairman of 
State Fair, and John Breland 
as co-chairman of School 
Spirit. Johnson moved to 
accept appointments, Lane 
seconded. Appointments 
accepted. 

Johnson moved to accept 
1976-77 budget. Lane secon- 
ded. Budget was approved. 

Bill No. 6 which states "...be 
it resolved that the SGA of 
Northwestern State 
University does appropriate 
$200.00 for use by tile Drama 
Agency.. ."was moved to be 
tabled until next week by C. 
Davis and seconded by 
Johnson. 

Sue Garcia, Debbie Page, 
and Liz Posey were chosen as 
nominees from SGA for State 
Fair Court 

*»* ui«x! 

C. Davis discussed Bill No.7 
which states"... therefore be it 
resolved that the SGA does 
authorize David Walker and 
Bob Ryder to attend the 
leadership seminar at 
Louisiana Tech University, 
Oct. 8 and 9 and incur ordinary 
and necessary travel expense 
as limited by the laws and 
regulations of the state of La." 
Johnson moved to accept the 
bill. Nugent seconded. Bill 
passed. 

C. Davis then discussed Bill 
No. 18 stating"... therefore be it 
resolved that the SGA does 
authorize a student 
referendum to propose an 
increase in student self 
, assesments by 25 cents per 
semester to fund a 
cheerleader agency account 
for use by the NSU 



cheerleaders." Lane moved to 
accept bill, McKellar 
seconded. Bill passed. 

C. Davis discussed Bill No. 9 
which states". ..Therefore be 
it resolved that the SGA does 
authorize a student 
referendum for the purpose of 
proposing an increase in 
student self asses- sments for 
KNWD from 50 cents per 
semester to $2.00 per sem- 
ester." Pittard moved to 
accept, Tyler seconded. Ryder 
and C. Davis requested roll 
call vote. Voting as follows: 
Yes: V. Davis, Dyess, 
Johnson, McKellar, Page, 
Pittard, Thompson, Baham 
No: Lane, Nugent 
A Abstain: Ryder 
Absent: Lynch, Boyd, 
Telambus 

Bill failed due to 
requirement for two thirds 
majority vote. Ryder moved 
to reconsider. Baham 
seconded . Ryder again 
requests roll call. Voting as 
follows: Yes: V.Davis, Dyess, 
Johnson, McKellar, Page, 
Pittard, Ryder, Thompson, 
Baham 

No: Lane, Nugent 

Absent: Lynch, Boyd, 

Telambus 

Bill again fails. Paged 
moved to table until next 
week. Dyes seconded. Motion 
passed. 

Nugent moved to adjourn. 
Pittard seconded. Motion 
passed. Meeting adjourned at 
7:52 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Debbie Page 
Senate Clerk 

There was a called meeting 
of the Northwestern SGA on 
September 29, 1976. Bob Ryder 
called the meeting to order at 
6:40 p.m. There were no ab- 
scences. 

Walker announced that 
there would be a meeting of 
the Student Service Com- 
mittee Wednesday October 6 
at 3:00 p.m. 

OLD BUSINESS 

Senate Bill No.9 was read 
and discussed before moving 
into new business. 

NEW BUSINESS 

Motion was made by 
Johnson and seconded by V. 
Davis to pass Bill No. 9 which 
states "...therefore be it 
resolved, that the SGA does 



authorize a student 
referendum for the purpose of 
proposing an increase in 
student self assessments for 
KNWD from 50cents per 
semester to $2.00 per 
semester." Question was 
called. Roll call was requested 
concerning question. Voting 
was as follows: 

Yes: V.Davis, Johnson, 
Lynch, McKellar, Page, 
Pittard, Ryder, Thompson, 
Baham, Boyd, Telambus. 

No: Dyess, Lane, Nugent 



question was accepted. R 
call was requested for vott 
of Bill No.9; voting 
Follows: 

Yes: V.Davis, Johnso 
Lynch, McKellar, Pagj 
Pittard, Ryder, Thomji3 
Baham, Boyd, Telambus. I 

No: Dyess, Lane, Nugi 

Bill was accepted. 

Johnson moved to adjoint 
Baham seconded. Meettj 
adjourned at 6:52 p.m. 

Respectfully SubmitU 
Debbie Pa) 
Senate a« 



\ 



Current Sauce 



COLETTE OLDMIXON 
Editor 



BOB RYDER 
Managing Editor 



BILL BOSSIEP 
Sports Editor 



PAULA JETTON 
News Editor 



OLU AKINRINADE 
Assistant News Editor 

MARK BANDY 
Business Manager 

RODNEY WISE 
Circulation Manager 



RONALD BUZZETTA 
Assistant News Editor 

MARK SMITH 
Advertising Manager 

CRAIG BERTHOLD 
Cartoonist 



drear, 
brothers w 
be shoppii 
two bridge 
Sickle Cell 
The Esc 
Omega Psi 
m Mon. 
Student TJ 
bership inc 
Frenard 
Kennedy, 
Reporter, 
President, 
President 
Secretary, 
Treasurer, 
Herschel 
Harris, 
Wendell 
Kelly, Mic 
Traylor, J 
Daniel Jo 
Qab also 1 
A Bayou 
money for 
The O 
fraternity 
beading a 
allBlack 
campus fi 
elections t 



MIKE RABALAIS FAIR HYAMS 

Photographers 

FRANKLIN PRESSON 
Adviser 



the official publication of the student body 

k ia_ . •_ » . _ . _ i_ ■ » . . --:«na ' 



Current Sauce is 

orthwestern State University ' in Natchitoches, Louisiana 
newspaper is entered as second class matter at the Natchitoches f 
Office under an act of March 3, 1879 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday during the fall and sf», 
semesters with the exception of holidays and testing periods a™ 
weekly during the summer semester. It is printed at the Natchi 1 
Times, Highway 1 South, Natchitoches, Louisiana. 

Editorial offices are located in Room 225, Arts and Scle 
Building and telephones are 357 5456 and 357 6874, Business. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are solely those ot 
student editors and do not necessarily represent the viewpoint ' 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body of Northwestern- 

Letters to the editor are invited and contributions are solicited t 
students, faculty, and staff and from student organizations L * Vj 
must be signed and no more than 500 words to be considered y 
publicahon. Names will be withheld upon request. , 

The staff of Current Sauce reserves the right to edit all M te - 
sake of lournalistic style and available space 




BAKER'S 

We Seldom Say No! 

THE OFFICE PEOPLE 
IN NATCHITOCHES 

Phone NSU Hot-Line 352-6466 



INTRODUCING 

WORD OF LIFE BOOKSTORE 

BIBLES PAPERBCKS 
SUNDAY SCHOOL SUPPLIES S0NGB00KS 
STATIONERY G|FTS 
SHEET MUSIC TAPES 
ALBUMS OPEN UNTIL 6:00 

617 SECOND STREET-NATCHITOfHEQ 




GINE 
ticipat 
f ore di\ 

* r e Bett 
Lad 



October 5. 1976 CURRENT SAUCE Page 3 




sh this goal is to 1,, Omega Psi Phi 
sentative corr^ fhe Theta Delta Chapter of 
annot be omega Psi Phi Fraternity, 

members. l_ attended the annual North 



Some of the duties will include 
transportation to the polls, 
visitation to the homes in the 
j)C.a«enaeauie annual ii or in community and giving out 
littee memberiwisjana area workshop held leaflets concerning the can- Alpha fe^m. "boOi teams' ai 
u a ^chance to ^ Monroe, La. on &t Oct 2. didates in the elections, and undefeated going into this 



tut if you want to 



A, TTK^ 



Greek Review - 

OH><& KKH» ITT 



4*1 



students to come out for the 
showdown Wednesday af- 
ternoon, between the Kappa 
Sigma No.l team and Kappa 



ho may have sajjj grothers attending the 

to yours. A ^ jieeting were: Wendell 

imittee member, Robinson, James Smash, 

jortunity to meet, Jer<wne Fay, Albert Sibley, 

nd performers , jlarvin Rogue, Jerry 

lere. [Richardson, Gary Richards, 

tod Ricky Christopher. Other 
am not saying i t t , . 
to o out d '(hapters that were present 
go ou an jo(i| -ere Gamma Gamma- 
)mmittee to g e t 



proper voting procedures. 
Omega Psi Phi would like to 
invite all other students who 
are interested to participate in 
this project. 



fere Gamma Gamma 
grambling State University, 
and see how ?mega-Shreveport Mu 
"^Tau-Monroe, Gamma 

Onoicion-Minden, Pi Tau 
by Room 21 « ^ ^ 

Union and fill (J 



game. The Kappa Sigma is 
lead by veterans Henry 
(Hands) Grabner, Terry 
Downs, John Breland, and 
Gary (JackRay) McElwee. 

New members to the offense 
this year who have done a 
great job are Mark Matthews, 
Mark Monval, Mark Cottrell, 
Delta State journeyed to Tom Barton, Freddy Wiggins, 
Natchitoches for the football and Denma Mayeaux. The 

defense hosts a team full of 



Phi Mu 

On Saturday, September 25, 
a group of nine Phi Mu's from 



Garcia for their new addition 
to their family, a baby girl, 
Laura. Laura is Kappa 
Sigma 's first Starduster ever 
at NSU. 

SIGMA KAPPA 
Sigma Kappa held a drop 

letter ceremony and a fireside 

chat, last Tuesday. 
The Sigmas played their 

first football game against the 

Tri-Sigs, and won 12-0. 
Pledge of the Week is Marid 

Russo. Sunshines of the week 

are Noonie D'Angelo and Anne 

Bates. 

Following the pep rally last 
Thursday afternoon, Sigma 
Kappa held a chapter ex- 



game that night. After the 

B game, another win for the veterans with Lang Bailey and 

chapter Chap e Demons, the girls spent the Mon **° the ^""^ Ua 

;ee application, ^ess anfa^ sS PP 

id that the SUGB T^a a Ka V. WCre several NSU Phi Mu's t" 1 * 5 *** mt # ven *e op- ^f 133 " ^, . 

i -ui . 4 Iscussed and a dinner was «verai nmj rni mu s. . „ . « I Congratulations go to Bettv 

y baking for * ^ ^ Last Monday Sigma Kappa £™ «"* J» Williamson for all her hS 

the DecoraBj^,. £ u Tau . No. 2 flag football team for- throw - To » ve them a break, 



tee which receaj ^ ^ ^ 9> ^ feited to Phi Mu making the 

a new chairman. Brothers ^ ^ engaged in record 1-0 this season with a 
is nothing to Iom their annual Sickle Cell drive game ***** ^ta Zeta to be 
and there is plea, Held in the city of Nat- rescheduled sometime in the 
L No one is just a cbitoches. Everyone is urged ^ ure - 
up to you out of to support the chapter by 
le and say, "I *, giving contributions to fight 
work with am this 
es, you have to 
>w you are there. 



n was accepted. R 
requested for vott 
No.9; voting 



we have Andy (Killer) 
McGlathrey to provide the 
rush. At middle linebacker we 
have veteran Billy (White 
Shoes) Stewart who also is 
head coach. At defense backs 
the Phi's sold homemade we have Jr. David Walker, 
dreadful disease The cocki ^ and cupcakes in the ^ Ranger, Mark Cottrell, 
Others will be stationed at dorms as a money making Gary McElwee and Victor 
fee shopping centers and the P"*"* for their pledge class. Logan. Doing toe kicking for 
*o bridges, so please give to ^ was very sue- the Sigs is rookie Frank (legs) 

sujjlg ceii cessful and the pledges would Cecero. 

The Esquire Club of the Uke to thank all the people who The brothers would like to 
Omega Psi Phi fraternity met from them. congratulate John Breland 

on Mon. Sept. 27, in the ^ entire chapter would and David McKinney for 
Student Union. New mem- Uke to wish their entrants- Jr - Oass ^tor. We 

bership include the following: Deni " Gueringer, Kay abo held a chapter exchange 
Frenard Jackson, Danny B°hnger and Layne Benson — with the sisters jrf Sigma 
Kennedy, Tyrone Johnson- K"* 1 luck » the pageant. 
Reporter, Charles Walker- 
President, Eddie Hamilton-V. KAPPA SIGMA 

Derry Wilson- The Kappa Sigma football thegirls for attending. 



It was held on Cane 
River at the Ho Down Plan- 
tation. We would like to thank 



We would also like to 



/.Davis, Johnjo 
McKellar, P|l 
Rvder ThonmJ President, 

Secretary, Donald Johnson- team has continued its win- 
Treasurer, Matthew Pearson, ning streak by defeating TKE congratulate Brothers Lane 
Berschel Moore, Larris 3W>, Sigma Tau Gamma 28-7, Johnson and Jimmy 
Harris, Larry Duncan, and Phi Bete Sigma 2M. The Crawford. Jimmy was 
Wendell Bonner, Michael Kappa Sigma offense has tw ° "ffif 
Kelly Michael Lewis Stevie scored a total of 90 points Lane ut "e dust this past 

^Vtfu^vM^' ^ t****' and 016 Mean Sw " 1 ° n SatUrday ' 

Daniel Jones. The Esquire defense have given up only 7 

Qab also held a "Disco Tex" points. The Casa Bandits, 

at Bayou Jacko's to raise which is Kappa Sigma's No.2 

money for new T-shirts. team, tied Kappa Alpha's 

The Omega Psi Phi team, who won by first downs. 

fraternity is also spear- The Bandits played a great wouia aiso i«e «, recogmze . ~- . - ~ ~ 
K . Mme bv stonninc Aloha our brothers on the team, Jack *appa aigma «o 

r Sg aV* PP Tty Brittain No.25, Randy Bon- Monday. The next game will 

toTZnd half witLut two nette No.65, Bobby "Killer" be^ainstKappaSujmaNo.2. 

elections to be held Nov 2 key players. We invite all Kirchoff No.73, and Alison The roses of Sigma Tau 
aecaons 10 oe neia «ov. i. j f-/ gcott Nq g< Good Lucfc Gamma held then: annual 

Brothers. slave sale ' Roses are sold to 

We would also like to the highest bidder and must 
congratulate Sue and Jay perform such chores as 



loyd, Telambus. 
'ess, Lane, Nuge 
) accepted, 
i moved to adjoor 
econded. Meetii 
at 6:52 p.m 



Debbie Pa| 
Senate Clei 



auce 



LLBOSSIEP 
ports Editor 



,D BUZZETTA 
nt News Editor 

RK SMITH 
tising Manager 

G BERTHOLD 

Cartoonist 



IRHYAMS 



Brothers. 

We would like to wish Coach 
A.L. Williams and the rest of 
the Demons good luck against 
the Colonels from Nicholls. We 
would also like to recognize 



beading a group project 
allBlack organizations on 
campus for the up-coming 



work as this year's director of 
Lady of the Bracelet Pageant. 
Also, to Darken Damico and 
Anne Bates, the two 
assistants. 

Sigma Kappa's five 
nominations for LOB, are 
Patty Harvey, Deanie Lan- 
clos, Debra Scott, Lee 
Williams, and Amy Yar- 
brough. 

Sigma Tau Gamma 

Sig Tau would like to 
congratulate the Demon 
football team for doing a 
fantastic job against Delta 
State. 

The brothers of Sig Tau 
would like to thank the 
brothers of Kappa Alpha and 
their dates for adding to the 
fun of the game Saturday 
night. Sig Tau was pleased to 
have all the parents at the 
Delta State game. 

Sig Tau would like to 
welcome Kary Collins and 
Mike Jones as new pledges to 
the brotherhood. 

An exchange with Delta 
Zeta sorority was held 
Wednesday night at White 
Columns. 
Sig Tau was defeated by 
1 last 



Four of the NSU Arabian 
horses received awards at the 
fall All-Arabian Horses Show 
in Baton Rouge. 

Aayar, a gelding, won first 
place in the English pleasure 
class and finished fourth in 
showmanship. Aayar is a 
veteran Arabian show horse 
that has been shown at many 
of the top exhibitions in the 



the student bodv^ 
les, Louisiana 
he Natchitoches r 

ngthefallandsl* 
sting periods .an 
d at the Natchi"*T' 

Arts and SC^f 
174, Business. 
; solely those «• 
t the viewpoint * 
of Northwestern ., 
msare solicited ' 
rganizations. L ■* ^ . 
to be consider* ^ 
est 

to edit a 



>nsio=' — 
aM letter* 





washing their cars, carrying 
their books and such for a 
certain length of time. 

Sig Tau sends best wishes 
and lots of luck to Brother 
Paul Myers and Rose Pat 
Mathews who were recently 
engaged and plan to be 
married in December. 
Congratulations. 

Delta Zeta pledged eight 
new girls Wednesday, Sept. 22, 
at the Delta Zeta lodge. The 
girls were Lore Cheatham, 
Diane Edwards, Elaine 
Howell, Donna Johnson 
Debbie Lackey, Mandy 
LeCroix, and Marian 
McLaurin. We would like to 
welcome these girls into our 
sisterhood. This brings the fall 
pledge class to a total of 31. 

Most of the pledges found 

out who their big sisters were 

last Wednesday by the old 
shoe method. 
Delta Zeta won its first 

intramural football game by 
forfeit. Buster Brady and 
Scottie Wise are our football 
coaches. The girls appreciate 
the great job that is being done 
by their coaches. 

TAU KAPPA EPSILON 
The upperclassmen pledges 
of the Epilon-Upsilon Chapter 
are preparing themselves to 
go through Active Board 
tonight. The objective of the 
Active Board is to see if the 
associate members are 
adequately prepared for 
initation. Going through it will 
be Mike Anyan of Winnfield 
and Chuck Preston of New 
Orleans. 

The Lil Sis of TKE are 
having a 50's "sock hop", at 
toe house Friday for the 
members. 

SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 
Congratulations go to 
Rhonda Baham and all the 
other newly elected Senate 
members. Rhonda was 
elected sophomore class 
representative. 

Plans are underway for Tri- 
Sigma's fall work projects. 
The first project will be a car 
wash scheduled for the 11th 
and 12th of Oct. The cars will 
be cleaned, washed and 
vacuumed at the City Bank 
East Branch on Keyser 
Avenue. Tickets may be 
purchased from any member 
of the sorority . 



Arabian horses win 
honors for NS U 



nation. 

Iben Thunder Bolt, the 
junior champion of the 
Louisiana All- Arabian Horse 
Show last spring, placed third 
in the halter class for 1975 
colts. 

Fourth place awards were 
won by Alpha Omega in the 
halter class for three-year old 
mares and in the western 
pleasure class for junior 
horses. 

Aina, a three-year old 
Arabian mare acquired by 
NSU from Sunburst Arabians 
of Borne, Texas, won fourth 
place in pleasure driving. 

NSU's Arabian show horses 
were trained and shown by 
NSU students who are 
enrolled in courses in the 



equine science division. 

Showing horses in the Baton 
Kouge show were Wayne 
Fisher, Lee Bennett, Gail 
Thompson and Martha 
Murdock. 

This month the NSU 
students are scheduled to 
participate in the horse shows 
at the Louisiana State Fair in 
Shreveport, according to Mrs. 
Cedle Hetzel, head of equine 
science division. 

The students will enter the 
American Quarter Horse 
Association show on Oct. 30-31 
and the Appaloosa Horse show 
on Oct. 23. 

They will serve on the 
production staff for the Pony 
of the Americas show on Oct. 
29. 



Phi Eta Sigma meets 



GINE! — Girls who accepted invitations to 
Jticipate in the 1976 LOB pageant found time 
*°re diving into a hectic but fun-filled schedule 
~\eet fellow contestants and trade gossip, 
•ng to the girls during the acceptance tea 
J e Betty Williamson, executive director of the 
Ij^nt, and Cheryl Purcell, the reigning Miss 



Lady of the Bracelet. 



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arms, legs & face 
REMOVED. ..quickly ana 
permanently by a Registered 
Electrologist. "G, J." 
Johnson, 1013 Parkway Drive, 
Phone 352- 4933. By ap 
pointment only! 



Phi Eta Sigma Honor 
Fraternity will meet Tuesday, 
October 5, in Room 114 of the 
Biological Sciences Building 
at 7 p.m. Dr. Harry G. Mobley, 
an obstetrician and gyneco- 
logist here in Natchitoches, 



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will speak to the group on the 
subject of the "Oral Con- 
traceptives-its Benefits and 
Side Effects." 

All interested NSU students 
are invited to attend. 

DISCOUNT 
PRINTING 



IBM Bond Copier 

Phone 352-6466 
132 St. Denis St. 






I 


1 

1 





KAPPA ALPHA - The Kappa 
Alpha Order pledged 33 new- 
members to their chapter this fall. 
Members of the pledge class not 



pictured above are Richard Mc- 
Crory. Eric Schmidt, Clifford 
Kowzer. Ronnie Bruit and 
Murdock. 



Allen 



Campus Colloquy 
FORMULA FOR FULFILLMENT 



1 



Dr. Michael DeBakey 
(Dr. DeBakey is the 
president and chief executive 
officer of the Baylor College of 
Medicine in Houston.Texas. A 
world famous pioneer of ar- 
tifical heart surgery, he is the 
recipient of the Modern 
Medicine Award, the 
Distinguished Service Award 
of the American Medical 
Association, the Gold Scapel 
Award of the International 
Cardiology Found 
ation, and for two years the 
Medical World News salute as 
"Doctore of the year.") 

Think not that I came to 
destroy the law, or the 
prophets; I am not come to 
destroy, but to fulfill. Mat- 
thew, 5:14-17 

I am pleased to have the 
opportunity to offer a message 
to college students through 
Campus Colloquy, whose 
purpose exemplifies the goal 
of education— the free ex- 
change of ideas and transfer 
of information. It is especially 
gratifying to see this forum for 
positive ideas on the college 
campus, in light of the undue 
and somewhat misleading 
emphasis in the news media 
on the dissent, militant 
element in the colleges. The 
prevalence of such negativism 
has, I believe, been highly 
exaggerated, and is certainly 
at odds with my personal 
experience in visiting college 
campuses, conversing with 
young students throughout the 
country, and with my daily 
relationship With my own 
students. The habitual 



protestors, the agitators, the 
malcontents, the arsonists— 
these are only a small, albeit 
highly vocal and widely 
publicized, fraction of the 
college population. 

Far more representative of 
our young people are those 
who have expressed to me a 
genuine interest in their 
studies and in the pursuit of 
excellence, with a serious 
desire to achieve something 
worthwhile in life. Realization 
of such a goal requires an 
education today, and 
education requires self- 
discipline. It is the lack of self- 
discipline that leads the 
nihilist to dissipate his energy 
in negative thoughts and 
destructive acts. 

We must not, therefore, 
allow the publicity given the 
dissident factions to mislead 
us into believing that ir- 
rational protest and non- 
negotiable demands are the 
order of the day. The more 
enobling, though perhaps less 
newsworthy endeavors in life 
are far more prevalent— and 
more gratifying. The 
discovery of an exciting new 
scientific concept, theory, or 
natural law in the resear- 
cher's pursuit of truth: the 
creation of a great painting, a 
moving poem, or a lovely 
sonata : the successful 
medical or surgical treatment 
of an otherwise fatal disor- 
der—yes, even the repair of a 
nonfunctioning television set, 
air-conditioner, or plumbing 
system— can bring deep and 
lasting gratification. By 



contrast, how fleeting the 
"high" derived from smoking 
a marijuana cigarette, 
dropping acid, or resorting to 
other forms of chemical 
copout. Momentary too is the 
satisfaction of toppling the 
established system of the day 
in retaliation for presumed 
injustice, for that satisfaction 
quickly fades in the inevitable 
aftermath of self- 
recrimination and remorse. 

The threshold of maturity on 
which the college student 
stands is the doorsill of the 
expansion of the mind— a 
stage of life that has always 
been accompanied by skep- 
ticism and dissent. Rational 
skepticism is the hallmark of 
the scholar and reasonable 
dissent of the bedrock of 
democracy. But these function 
best for us when we have a 
positive, constructive goal in 
mind. And this I believe the 
preponderance of college 
students have today. Today's 
students are brighter, better 
informed, and more socially 
conscious than any of their 
predecessors. They are less 
frivolous, and more deeply 
emersed in sociocultural 
affairs. I have been impressed 
with the sincere human 
concern and the intentness of 
purpose of those with whom I 
have spoken. They are pur- 
suing their studies diligently, 
eager to prepare themselves 
for responsible places in 
society and for wise social and 
political judgements in later 
life. 






BIG SPECIAL SALE!!! 
OCTOBER 1-23 

DISCOUNT PRICES 
THROUGHOUT THE STORE 

10% to 50% OFF 

SANDEFUR JEWELERS 



624 FRONT STREET 



PHONE 352-6390 



Page 4 CURRENT SAUCE October 5, 1976 



Public Relations progra m 



Students get involved 
in real life activities 



by KEN LANDRY 

NSU's advanced public 
relations program has 
recently received a 
scholarship to continue the 
work it performs in the 
Alexandria Mall. 

The NSU Foundation will 
award the scholarship each 
semester to a student par- 
ticipating in the advanced 
public relations project, 
coordinated by Franklin I. 
Presson, associate Drofessor 



of journalism. 



The scholarship was 
presented to the University by 
Paul Broadhead and 
Associates on Aug. 30 of this 
year. It is in the amount of 
$200 per semester and will run 
for an indefinite period. 

"Students participating in 
the promotion of Alexandria 
Mall, directed by Mrs. Anne 




SCHOLARSHIP ESTABLISHED — President 
Arnold R. Kilpa trick accepts the check from Paul 
Broadhead, of Paul Broadhead and Associates for 
NSU student scholarships. The scholarship is 
valued at $200 a semester and is sponosred by the 
Alexandria Mall. 



Shapiro, promotions coor- 
dinator, are chosen as 
recipients of the award." said 

Presson. 



"They take part in fields 
related to their academic ma- 
jors. This has included, in the 
past, projects in advertising 
design, art, merchandising, 
advertising in newspapers, 
radio and television, special 
projects, customer profile 
surveys, and newspaper 
publication," Presson con- 
tinued. 



"The customer profile 
survey designed and con- 
ducted by students from the 
College of Business and from 
public relations classes on the 
Natchitoches and Fort Polk 
campuses have received 
national recognition from the 
American Institute of 
Decision Sciences," Presson 
nrMed. 

Two different follow-up 
surveys have been conducted 
by business and public 
relations students. 

Presson commented, "One 
group of art students planned 
the mall theme for Christmas 
promotion of 1975. This theme 
was utilized in decorating the 
entire mall for the holiday 
season." 



"Another group of students 
planned and coordinated 



special exhibits, such as one 
including an Air Force trainer 
plane and a Fourth of July 
celebration," said Presson. 



Presson continued, "The 
program is designed to give 
NSU students involvement in 
real life activities in their 

major fields and direct con- 
tact with businessmen and the 

general public in respon- 
sibilities to develop their skills 
for employment after 

graduation." 

Two students involved in the 
program this past summer 
have stated that the program 
has exposed them to the type 
of things which could not be 
taught in a textbook or in the 
classroom. 

"Members of the Alexan- 
dria Mall Merchants 
Association —more than 50 in 
number — have cooperated 
fully in the program and have 
expressed appreciation for the 
quality of performance 
demonstrated by Nor- 
thwestern students," Presson 
said. 

"Efforts are being made to 
enlarge the program of 
teamwork in Alexandria Mall 
projects and to provide con- 
tinuing academic op- 
portunities for students on a 
basis of single projects, 
multiple projects, and 
semester projects," added 
Presson. 




1 

PERCUSSIONIST AT WORK _ John R. Raush, featured percussion 
soloist at the Natchitoches-NSU symphony concert gave a Der- 
formance many will not forget. Also featured at the concert was soprano 
Earline Miller. 



Tri Beta 
Travels 



Tri Beta, NSU's biology, 
oriented society, ventured out 
last weekend, to Cumberland 
Break. This swamp section of 
Kisatchie Forest proved to be 
an exciting challenge to the lj 

adventurers. The travelers 
were treated to scenes of 
beauty. 

Tri Beta will also visit the 
autumn sights of Arkansas 
Oct. 29-30. 

Several tentative service 
projects have also been 
planned one of which is at the 
Caroline Dorman Nature 
Preserve near Saline, La. 

The next meeting of Tri. 
Beta will be Thursday Oct. 14. 



Vacant dormitories eyed 
as possible offices, hotels 



by KEN LANDRY 

Utilization of vacant dor- 
mitories on the NSU campus 

as office space for state 
agencies is presently in the 
planning stages. 

If the state approves the 
project for NSU it will help 
"eliminate the drain on the 
System Fund," said President 
Kilpatrick. 



The program calls for the 
iorms to be leased out in two 
ways: as office space and as 
hotel type accomodations. 

Leasing the dorms out as 
office space would be prac- 
tical for both Northwestern 
and the agencies concerned. 



Dr. Kilpatrick said the 
agency could lease the space 
cheaper than it would cost the 
agency to build a structure of 
its own. He went on to say that 
NSU would benefit because it 
would generate revenue for 
space not now being used by 
putting it to use. 

President Kilpatrick con- 
tinued by saying such a plan 
will help "to pay off the in- 
debtness of the building and, 
by putting it to use, it would 
reduce the rate of deter- 
ioration." 



Before NSU can begin to 
lease these buildings the 
businesses concerned will 
have to study the feasibility of 
using them. 

The other method of leasing 



out the dorms would be as a 
hotel-tvpe accommodation 
where state agencies could 
send their employees. This 
would be cheaper than putting 
them up in a hotel, Kilpatrick 
said. 

The reason these agencies 
would send their employees 
here, Dr. Kilpatrick said, 
would be to take refresher 
courses which would be of- 
fered by NSU. 



Dr. Kilpatrick indicated 
that the strongest possibility 
among the dorms to be leased 
out would be Prudhomme and 
Bossier. 



The reasons these two 
dormitories are being con- 



sidered so highly is because of 
their parking areas. "Neither 
of these parking areas is being 
used now," said Kilpatrick. 

"In Bossier's case, if ad- 
ditional parking space is need- 
ed, we have the area around 
which it can be added on to," 
Kilpatrick said. 

Dr. Kilpatrick stated, "Over 
a period of time the Reserve 

Fund will be in jeapordy; it is 
not now, but if funds are not 



made available for it, it will 
be; therefore, we are trying to 
build up an emergency type 
thing to help pay off the 
dorms. The only money to pay 
for the dorms comes from the 
students." 



I*- -f Fiction contest announced 4- -f 



Women and men between 
the ages of 18 and 28, who have 
not previously published 
fiction in a magazine with a 
circulation greater the 25,000, 
are eligible to enter a new 



short story contest, announced 
today by Redbook magazine. 

The contest, which offers a 
first prize of $1500 and 
publication in Redbook's 
annual August fiction issue, 



will be judged by a panel of the 
magazine's editors. Second 
prize is $3oo, and there are 
three third prizes of $100. 

Details of the contest, ap- 
pearing in the magazine's 




current (October) issue, 
specify that manuscripts 
should be typed, double- 
spaced, on one side of white 8 
%-x-ll-inch paper, not more 
than 25 lines to a page. The 
stories must be no longer than 
25 pages, and each story must 
be submitted separately to 

Redbook's Young Writer's 
Contest, Box F, 230 Park 
Avenue, New York, N.Y. 
10017. Entries must be post- 
marked no later than 
December 31, 1976 and 
received by January 20, 1977. 



This is where it all happens 



t 



Behind a desk that 

seldom looks like the 

one pictured at the right 

sits a person whose job 

it is to see that the 

Current Sauce is put 

together in some type of 

coherent fashion and 
then printed and 
distributed to the 

students for their 
reading and criticism. 



"When told I had 
cancer of the larynx, 

my reaction was: 
what good is a lawyer 

without a voice?" 



Frank Purcell, Attorney 




I Who invented the telephone? 
A. Billy Gmhant. B. Alexander Gra- 
ham Bell. C. Graham Cracker. 

2 Hue or false. You ean sare up to 
(Wk during the week wheii you 
dial long distance the 1 + way before 
knXa.m. class instead of after. 

3 What citv has more telephones 
than people? A New York; X. Y. 
B. Copenhagen, Denmark. C. Wash- 
ington, D.C. 

4 Dialing 1 + long distance calls 
out of state after 11 p.m. costs 
. or less for the first minute. 



5 At 5:00 Sunday afternoon, rates 
for dialing 1 + calls: A Go up. 
B.Go down. C. Stay the same. 

6 One Plus dialing means: A You 
dial 1, plus the area code, if dif- 
ferent from youroicn, plus the num- 
ber to call long distance. B. You add 
up all the digits in a phone number 
and divide by 4.3. Tlic total equals 
t trice your age, plus one. 




(That's for out-of-state calls within the 
continental U.S.A.. of course. I A 
B. S1MC tfSM Each additional 

minute costs no more than 

A.SI4SB. M C. 75C. 



7 When is the very cheapest time 
to dial a 1 + call? A From 11 p.m. 
to S a.m. B. All weekend until 5 p.m. 
on Sunday. C. Weekdays, 8-5. 

8 If your budget is overspent again 
and you dial long distance the 
1 + way after 11 p.m. to get more 
money from home, you will: A . Get a 
busy signal B. Wake up your folks. 
C. Be a s??ia>i caller. 



South Central Bell 



"That was nine years ago. In less 
than two months after the operation. 1 
was back at work and talking. Sure, 
with a different voice. But still talking. 
Today, I do everything I did before. 
Even try cases in court. And. believe 
me. that takes a lot of talking. 

"All of this is thanks to early detec- 
tion, effective treatment made possible 
through advances in cancer research, 
and an overpowering will to talk again. 
Not to mention the extremely benefi- 
cial voice training program offered by 
the American Cancer Society. 

"I've won my battle. But the battle 
against cancer goes on. So. please, 
have regular checkups. And give to the 
American Cancer Society. We want to 
wipe out cancer in your lifetime." 



IDS -H'V-l : Y-9 -T-? ■V'Y- i r OS :3)l iL'Z- : 9'l I WIMSNV 



* 



American Cancer Society 

t mis SP4CE CONTKBu'EC B- -he buBl.SmEU »S » PuBl'C SES.'CS 



SEXI- 
NESS 
IS... 



HOMESTRETCH 
GOWNS 

by VAX I I V FAIR 




It has beer 
{lings musl 
pd the Ark 
f oved thus 
iorthweste 
,turday nij 
The Demo 
I 2 game 
mild not ke< 
f powerful 
, a 44-24 dei 
it 

tfSU, with* 
jl-Amerk 
jdney Thoi 
jjnage 94 
Bring the c 
jdians ran 
jfenseama 
ie ground 
(rnered 33 
pair, while 
9, giving 
jense total 
jspectively. 
It was al] 
tginning a: 
(eningkicki 
ay, 80 yar 
beASU off i 
jyne at qui 
ieir plays 
suited in gi 
SU defense 
The Indian 
ird facei 
gainst the D 
id goal at t 
ies from the 
the 1 an* 
bwn, ASU | 
to the endz 
The next tb 
indson the I 
kicky Laynt 
irds and ar 



Fla 



Intramural 
munderws 
it, and tl 
iaity of v 
l Both 
mi greek lei 
action si 
September 22 

to Tuesdaj 
pendent 
itated the 
OTC Rangei 
Vides Rait 
Hghnecks 2 
i the Steele 
Wtof 76 by 



Kappa 
® by the s 
tipped Phi 1 
'Kappa Phi 
"xUtsfoughl 
Kap 




; sar -;R 5 . 5 ssr. 



*$*r"Y.' II?, 



32-2= 



Dixie Pla^a Shopping Center 
Natchitoches. La. 




}E AGO 

Jhy ... s 

"ornton ai 
I field aj 
f'ters. NJ 
^ to see 



if; 



rs. 

& Lou U 
^ssor « 
J*tion at 
* Univers 
intei 
1 executiv 
%na As 
^Uegiate 



s 



• Pat Jo 
<*sity of 
and 
mac 
ent oi 



Ocolber 5. iy<o i.Lhn£,i\i o.-\<. ^ 



Bete 

vels 

NSU's biology, 
ity, ventured out 
, to Cumberland 
iwamp section of 
rest proved to be 
lallenge to the lg 

The travelers 
i to scenes of 

'ill also visit the 
its of Arkansas 

aitative service 
jve also been 
of which is at the 
'orman Nature 
it Saline, La. 
meeting of Tri- 
ITiursday Oct. 14. 



Indians end Demon Win Streak, 44-24 



ghly is because of 
5 areas. "Neither 
ing areas is being 
said Kilpa trick. 

>r's case, if ad- 
ng space is need- 
the area around 
be added on to," 
lid. 

ick stated, "Over 
ime the Reserve 

in jeapordy; it is 
if funds are not 



ble for it, it will 
, we are trying to 
emergency type 
lp pay off the 
nly money to pay 
i comes from the 



It has been said that all good 
Dings must come to an end, 
pd the Arkansas St. Indians 
roved this old adage to the 
orthwestern Demons last 
iturday night. 

The Demons, riding high on 
2 game winning streak, 
(did not keep it going against 
f powerful Indians and fell 
,g 44-24 defeat in Jonesboro, 

tfSU, without the services of 
^-American candidate 
0ney Thornton, could only 
jgnage 94 yards rushing 
uring the contest, while the 
jdians ran over the NSU 
jfense amassing 422 yards on 
ie ground. The Demons 
trnered 334 yards through 
t air, while Arkansas gained 
53, giving the teams total 
jense totals of 428 and 555, 
upectively. 

K was all ASU from the 
tginning as they took the 
pening kickoff and began a 15 
ty, 80 yard scoring drive, 
be ASU offense, with Bucky 
iyne at quarterback, mixed 
ieir plays up well, which 
suited in gaping holes in the 
SU defensive front line. 
The Indians, aided by a 16 
ird facemask penalty 
gainst the Demons, got a first 
id goal at the NSU 4. Three 
jes from the 4 moved the ball 
the 1 and on the fourth 
urn, ASU punched the ball 
to the endzone. 
The next time ASU got their 
tods on the ball, quarterback 
ucky Layne dashed for 52 
irds and another six points 



for the Indians. The PAT was 
no good because of a bad snap 
and this left the score at 13-0. 

If scoring the first two times 
they had the ball wasn't bad 
enough, ASU scored a field 
goal on their third possession 
of the evening. The Indian 
defense once again forced the 
Demons to punt and ASU took 
the ball from their own 10 to 
the NSU 18. The driver fizzled 
out here, and the Indians 
settled for a 35 yard field goal, 
stretching their lead to 16-0. 

The Arkansas St. defense 
continued to give the Demons 
all they could handle when 
they tried to run the ball and 
the early passes were falling 
away from their intended 
receivers. 

Bucky Layne, however, 
gave the Demon defense all 
they could handle. A 52 yard 
run gave ASU their second 
score and a 34 yard TD pass 
early in the second quarter put 
six more points on the board. 
The PAT made the score 23-0, 
ASU. 

NSU had an opportunity to 
get one the scoreboard at 
about the five minute mark of 
the second period. The NSU 
defense, finally awakened 
themselves, behind 23-0, 
sacked quarterback Layne 
forcing him to fumble. 

Jerry Edwards recovered 
for the Demons at the ASU 36. 
The Arkansas St. defense held 
the Demons for two plays and 
then Butch Ballard found 



Frank Haring open on the 
sight sideline for a 17 ayrd 
gain. The play was nullified on 
a holding penalty. This was 
the end of the NSU drive and a 
poor 17 yard punt gave ASU 
the ball at their 35. 

The Indians, not slacking up 
at all, marched 65 yards in 
only seven plays to make the 
score 30-0. 

After the kickoff, a Stuart 
Wright-Wyamond Waters 
bomb was good for 65 yards 
and a first down at the ASU 21. 
Two plays later, Wright found 
Waters in the left front edge of 
the endzone for the TD and the 
dock showed one second left 
in the half. The try for two 
points failed and the half time 
score was 30-6. 

A partially blacked Dennis 
Pendergraft set up ASU's first 
score of the second half. The 
punt only went for 20 yards 
and gave the Indians a great 
opportunity at the Demon 26. 
On first down, Layne fired a 
pass to Middlebrook over the 
middle for another ASU TD. 
The PAT was good, making 
the score 37-6. 

NSU's offense couldn't get 
anything going against the 
Indians tough defense. Mark 
Rhodes, David Wright and 
Butch Ballard all tried their 
hand at quarterback but it did 
not seem to get the Demons 
anywhere. NSU punted for 11 
times in the game for a 36.5 



Flag football gets results 




Intramural flag football has 
m underway for two weeks 
if, and there has been 
ity of very interesting 
ittan. Both the independent 
id greek leagues have been 
action since Tuesday, 
tytember 22. 

* Tuesday, the 22nd in- 
pendent action, BSU 
fated the Bows 13-6, the 
UC Rangers defeated the 
fides Raiders 16-6, the 
Ighnecks 20, Varnado 12, 
'the Steelers stomped the 
ft of '76 by the score of 25- 

Vednesday's greek action 
J» Kappa Sigma trounce 
"~ by the score of 36-0, KA 
*d Phi Beta Sigma 14-7, 
Kappa Phi and Coussau's 
""ts fought to a 6-6 tie, with 
Kap winning 



penetrations, Zeta Phi Beta 
forfeited to DZ, the BSU girls 
beat Tri-Siema No. 1 6-0. and 
Tri Sigma No.2 forfeited to 
Sigma Kappa. 

Thursday's action saw the 
Spirit of 76 bounce back and 
defeat the ROTC Rangers 19-6, 
the Bows beat the Roughnecks 
by the same 19-6 score, PEK 
and the Rapides Raiders tied 
6-6, with PEK getting the 
victory in a tiebreaker, and 
Couyon 8 blanked BSU 25-0. 




This past Monday's greek 
action was very spirited, as 
Sigma Kappa blanked Tri- 
Sigma No.l 12-0, KA and 
Coussau's Bandits fought to a 
13-13 tie, with KA winning on 
first downs and Kappa Sigma 
whipped Sigma Tau Gamma 
by the score of 26-6. 

Wednesday saw Sigma Tau 
Gamma whip Coussau's 
Bandits 27-0, Pi Kappa Phi 
squeak by TKE 7-2, the Hot 
Dogs forfeited to BSU, and 
Kappa Sigma blasted Phi Beta 
Sigma 26-0. 

Entries for intramural 
tennis will open on October 1, 
and will remain open until 
October 8. There will be action 
in singles, doubles, and mixed 
doubles, and play will begin 
Oct. 15 and run through Oct. 17 
on the NSU courts. 



tor «fl 



!JJS AGONY ... EVEN IN VIC- 
JHY ... Sidney "Thundering Bull" 
^rnton as he is being assisted off 
J. field against DSU by the NSU 
? l ners. NSU coaches and fans were 
^ to see that the injury he suf- 



fered in the first quarter against 
DSU was not as serious as it ap- 
peared to be. "The Bull" has been 
limping somewhat, but he will be 
back. 



^Irs. Lewis named LAIA Wtreas. 



J*- Lou Lewis, associate 
" e «sor of physical 
**tion at Northwestern 
* University, has been 
U^ted interium treasurer 
executive board of the 
j^ana Association for 
^collegiate Athletics for 



Pat Johnson of the 
*^ity of Southwestern 
tr*na and president of 
• ^ made the an- 
ent of Mrs. Lewis' 



appointemnt. 

The Louisiana Association 
of Intercollegiate Athletics for 
Women is an organization 
which sponsors state cham- 
pionships in volleyball, 
basketball, tennis, and soft- 
ball for the 14 member 
colleges and universities. 

Mrs. Lewis, who formerly 
coached women's basketball 
and volleyball at Nor- 
thwestern, joined the 
university's faculty in the 



Department of Health, 
Physical Education and 
Recreation in 1965. 

She has more than 35 years 
of experience as both a 
teacher and coach. Mrs. Lewis 
taught and coached at Sarepta 
High School for 12 years and at 
West Monroe High School for 
10 years. Other schools where 
she previously taught or 
coached are Sterlington High 
School, Neville High School, 
and Bryceland High School. 



yard average, while ASU 
punted only four times for a 
42.3 yard average. 

A four play, 80 yard drive 
gave the Indians another 
score before the end of the 
third period. This drive was 
aided by a 30 yard pass in- 
terference penalty against 

NSU. 

The interference penalty put 
the ball on the Demon six, and 
it took only one play for the 
Indians to score. This was the 
end of ASU's scoring, but it 
was more than enough, as 
they had a commanding 44-6 
lead going into the fourth 
quarter. 

Two ASU fumbles set up 
NSU's next two touchdowns. 
An Indian fumble early in the 
fourth quarter gave the 
Demons the ball at the ASU 34. 
A third down pass from 
Wright to Waters gave NSU 
the score, a 34 yard strike in 
the endzone. 

Another ASU fumble gave 
the Demons the ball at their 
35, Stuart Wright, going 
mostly to the air, found Kenny 
Meeks, Mike Almond, and 
Wyamond Waters on several 
good yardage plays. With first 
and 10 at the Indian 14, the 
Demons could go nowhere. A 
five yard penalty against ASU 
moved the ball to the 10, and 
on second down, Mark 
Schroeder scored the six 
points for the Demons. 



The last Demon score was 
set up on a 49 yard pass play 
from Wright to Waters that 
put the ball at the ASU 16. On 



first down, Wright found Bo 
McCollister open in the end- 
zone for the last Demon score 
of the evening. 
The Demons return to 



Natchitoches this Saturday 
night to try and make it three 
in a row at home against the 
Nicholls State Colonels from 
Thibodaux. 



Nicholls was last year's GSC 
champions and were a 14-0 
winner last week against 
Cameron University of 
Oklahoma. 







Pigskin Predictions 



It couldn't have happened to a nicer guy, 
but Bob Ryder really blew it last week on his 
predictions. Ryder and Bill Hochstetler tied 
for the cellar, both going 6-15 for 40 percent. 
Dr. Miller was a close second, going 8-15 for 53 
percent, and yours truly led the pack with 9-15 
for 60 percent. 



This week's guests are Mike Rabalais and 
Chris Ferguson. Mike Rabalais is a staff 
photographer for the Current Sauce and Chris 
is a trainer for the NSU Demon football team. 






NSU vs NICH 
LSU vs VANDY 
TUL vs. SYRAC. 
USL vs LAMAR 
TECH vs UT-A 
MCNEESE vs NLU 
SLU vs TROY ST. 
GRAM vs TENN ST. 
OKLA vs TEXAS 
GA. vs MISS. 
ATLANTA vs N. O. 
MIAMI vs BALT. 
DEN. vs HOUSTON 
DALLAS vs Giants 
SEATTLE vs. G. B. 

Last week's totals 
Percentages to date 



BOSSIER 

NSU 24-14 
LSU 38-6 
SYRAC 66-3 
USL 17-10 
TECH 27-13 
MCNEESE 28-17 
TROY ST. 28-21 
TENN ST. 17-12 
OKLA 28-12 
GA. 14-13 
N. O. 17-13 
BALT. 28-21 
HOUSTON 31-13 
DALLAS 42-27 
SEATTLE 10-7 
9-15. .60 
34-58, .59 




1 



RYDER 

NSU 24-10 
LSU 56-7 
TUL 13-7 
LAMAR 21-14 
TECH 28-17 
MCNEESE 17-13 
SLU 20-17 
GRAM 38-31 
TEXAS 21-20 
MISS 7-3 
N. O. 23-17 
BALT. 27-17 
HOUSTON 20-17 
DALLAS 24-20 
SEATTLE 17-13 
6-15, .40 
29-58, .50 



RABALAIS 

NSU 14-10 

LSU 21-10 

TUL 14-0 

USL 21-0 

TECH 28-21 
MCNEESE 10-7 

TROY ST. 20-14 

TENN ST. 21-10 
TIE — 17-17 
MISS. 7-0 

N. O. 14-7 

BALT. 10-7 

HOUSTON 21-10 

DALLAS 17-10 
SEATTLE 28-3 



6-15, .40 
1MB, 4fi 



FERGUSON 

NSU 21-10 
LSU 14-13 
TUL 10-7 
USL 28-7 
TECH 21-14 
MCNEESE 31-14 
TROY ST. 14-6 
TENN ST. 14-10 
OKLA. 28-14 
GA. 24-10 
N. O. 21-17 
BALT. 24-21 
HOUSTON 17-14 
DALLAS 24-10 
SEATTLE 7-6 

8-15, .53 
32-58. .55 



Ladies Begin Action 



The Northwestern State 
University Lady Demon 
volleyball team began action 
this past Saturday down in 
Thibodaux against the 
women's team from Nicholls 
State University. 

This year's team will be 
aiming for the state cham- 
pionship, which narrowly 
escaped them last sason. The 
Lady Demon volley bailers lost 
to the team from Tulane in the 
state finals last year, and had 
to settle for second place. In 
1974, the Lady Demon team 
was the state volleyball 
champions. 

This year's squad is much 
younger than last years team, 
and will face very stiff 
competition in tournament 



action this fall. 

October 4 will find the Lady 
Demon team at home, facing 
the team from Northeast 
Louisiana University. The 
action begins at 7:00p.m. in 
NSU'S Health and P.E. 
Majors Building. 

Members of this year's 
squad include Diana Cary, 
Cheryl Dore, Sheila Credeur, 
Jill Hyatt, Mary Sonnier, 
Gwen Teekell, Doray 
Schonfield, Debbie Jenkins, 
Gail Brown, Pam Moore, 
Jonan Courtney, Carolyn 
Quave, and Tammy Pruitt. 



NATCn <0CHES PARISH FAIR 

OCT. 5-9 

Fair Time 

Means 
Western 
Wear Time! 



"YOU WANT IT, 
WE GOT IT, 
COME GET IT." 

SHAMROCK 
DISCOUNT LIQUOR 



302 HWY. 1 SOUTH 



352-8309 



OUR OCTOBER SPECIAL: 

With purchase of any pair of 
men's boots, ONE PAIR OF W 

LADIES' MOCCASINS FREE 
FOR YOUR WIFE OR GIRLFRIEND. 

Moke the Hitchin' Post your Western 
Wear Headquaters. You'll find what 
you're looking for. Our prices are 
fair - Our quality is Tops! 



* v hitchin' 

r> P65T 

I WESTERN STORES 

MANY LA , AN J NATCHITOCHES IA 



iv* B H 

If RODEO 

OCT. 7-8 
THUR. & FRI. 



Page 6 CURRENT SAUCE October 5, 1976 



Beef program initiated 



by Marvin L. Horton 

Dr. Zoel W. Daughtrey, 
head of the Agricultural 
Science Department at NSU 
recently described the beef 
cattle farm and the new plans 
for the NSU packing house. 

NSU received a lay out plan 
and approval from the legis- 
lature for a $240,000 meat 
facility for slaughtering, 
packing and retaining for 
beef. 

Daughtrey said that in past 
years NSU operated a dairy 
but had to close it down 
because it did not meet the 
State Health Department 
requirements. It would have 
cost over $250,000 to remain 
inoperation and bring the 
farm up to health standards, 
yet it does not cost as much to 



raise and breed beef cattle, registered Polled Herefords. 



Construction is expected to 
begin sometime in 1977 on one 
of the east pastures of the 
farm, Daughtrey stated. 

The program will be in 
conjunction with Natchitoches 
Trade School, which will teach 
meat cutting and packing. 
NSU Veterinary Technology 
and Agriculture Science 
Departments will use the farm 
to meet the academic needs of 
the students at NSU. 

Daughtrey said that since 
the system has changed, 
agricultural science's main 
interests are to raise prime 
registered beef herds. The 

NSU beef farm has about 50 
Charolais and about 30 



Daughtrey said Agricultural 
Science is a wide field that 
covers agriculture, hor- 
ticulture, natural science, 
forestry, and geology. 

The Char Swiss cattle were 
purchased for the Agricultural 
Science Department and a 
Red Brahma bull was loaned 
to the university in order that 
the students could study and 
breed NSU stock. 

Darrell Saul of Des Arc, 
Ark., donated a Polled bull to 
NSU that has a value of over 
$10,000. This bull was given to 
the university about two years 
ago and is now being used to 
up- grade the quality of the 
NSU beef herd. 



Bike rated no. 1 hazard 



Bicycles have been listed as a 
number one hazard in a 
list that includes just about 
every product used in and 
around the house by the U.S. 
Consumer Safety Com- 
mission. 

In Louisiana last year, over 
1,300 cyclists were injured and 
21 additional state residents 
died. Over 460,000 riders are 
taken to hospital emergency 
rooms nationwide. Seventeen 
per cent of the accidents 
around the country were due 
to mechanical and structural 
problems that could have been 
elemeinated with proper care 
and bicycle selection. 

There are also ten 
provisions of the State Law 
that pertain to bicyclists. The 
ten provisions are: 

1 All bicycle riders using a 
highway of this state have the 
same rights and are subject to 
the same laws applicable to 
the motor vehicle driver. 

2. Bicycle riders should ride 
as near to the RIGHT SIDE of 
the roadway (if riding with 
traffic) as practicable and 
exercise due care when 
passing a standing vehicle or 
one proceeding in the same 
direction. 

3. Bicyclists must not use 
roadways when bicycle paths 
are provided adjacent to a 
roadway. 

4. Bicycle riding on 
Louisiana interstate highways 
is against the law. 



5. Bicyclists should not 
carry more persons at one 
time than the bicycle is 
designed to carry. 

6. When riding the bicycle it 
is prohibited to cling or attach 
to any moving vehicle on a 
highway. 

7. The bicyclist must ride on 
a permanent or regular seat 
attached to the bicycle. 

8. At 8 U times the bicyclists 
must keep at least one hand on 
the handlebars. 

9. For night riding a bicycle 
must have a front white light 
and a rear red reflelctor. 



10. Working brakes that will 
make the braked wheels skid, 

on dry, level, clean pavement 
must be present on all 
bicycles. 

Tapp also urges all cycles to 
make it safer to ride on the 
roads by following these 
privisions and to also use 
common sense when riding or 
if you are in a vehicle near a 
bicyclist. Anyone who wants 
to learn more about cicycle 
safety can write for a free 
pamphlet available from the 
Governr's Office of Consumer 
Protection (P.O. Box 44091- 
Capitol Station, Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana 708045.) 






■ .... ■ .. 



Box office opens 




LAST TIME TONIGHT 



John Wayne 
In 

"THE SHOOTIST" 




STARTS TOMORROW 



"SWASHBUCKLER* 
Rated PG 



LAST TIME TONIGHT 



"SURVIVE" 
- -Plus — 
"HUSTLE" 
Both Rated PG 

Buck Nights 
'ednesdav-Tti 

"The Devil With In Her" 

— Plus — 
Hark of The Devil Part II ' 
Both Rated R 



Friday & Saturda 



- 



•FUTURE WORLD' 
With 
Peter Fonda 
—Plus- 
David Niven 
In 

"OLDDRACULA" 
Both Rated PG 




The Box Office is now open 
for the NSU Theatre 
production of the hilarious 
comedy, "Who's Happy 
Now?" by Oliver Hailey. The 
Box Office hours are 1-5 p.m. 
Monday-Friday and the 
number is 357-4179. 

Season tickets for the 1976-77 
season may also be purchased 
at this time. Tickets for the 
general public are $5.00 and 
tickets for NSU faculty, staff, 
and members of their families 
are $1.00. The season ticket 



sale will end Oct. 16. 

"Who's Happy Now?" is 
NSU's entry in this year's 
Louisiana Division of the 
American College Theatre 
Festival. The Festival is an 
annual event presented by the 
John F. Kennedy Center for 
the Performing Arts and the 
Alliance for Arts Education. It 
is produced by the American 
Theatre Association and 
sponsored by Amoco Oil 
Company. 



5$* 



Pizza Inn's Old Fashion Thick Crust 
Pizr.a . . or our Original Thin Crust. 
Your Choice . . . Both from the makers 
of America's Favorite Pi«a 
BUY ONE GET THE NEXT 
SMALL SIZE FREE!! 
Coupons Available In Room 211 
of the Student Union 

HWY 1 SOUTH 
PHONE 352-8263 



Pizza inn 




SAM MEMBERS — Northwestern State 
University's student chapter of the Society for the 
Advancements of Management has elected new 
officers for 1976-77. The newly-elected officers are 
(from left) publicity chairman Timothy Bonnette; 
program chairman Joe Lang, sponsor Dr. Marie 
Burkhead, Department of Business Admini- 
stration and Economics; secretary Keith Fon- 
tenot, membership chairman Steve Hudson; 
treasurer David Harding and President Carl 
Richie. 



NSU is fun place 



by Bob Rash 

Tired, or bored, or just want 
something to do. Check into 
the many different activities 
that are offered here on 
campus. A person can do 
anything from swimming to 
tennis to sailing and canoeing. 

There are different types of 
activity courses that are of- 
fered for course credit. In this 
way a student can get a grade 
for doing something that is 
enjoyable. 

If a person enjoys com- 
petition, he or she can enter 
into one of the many in- 
tramural games and contests 
that are offered throughout 
the fall and spring semesters. 
All one has to do is go by the 
Intramural office and inquire 
about upcoming activities. 
The office is located in the 
Recreation Building. 

A student may also check 
with the front desk of the dorm 
in which he resides to see 
games and equipment which 
may be checked out from 
them. 

The natatorium is open 



every day for the students use. 
The pool hours are : Monday 3- 

7 p.m., Tuesday thru Friday 3- 

8 p.m., and from 1-5 p.m. on 
Saturdays and Sundays. The 
student must bring his I.D. 
card to get in. 

The gym in the Health and 
P.E. Majors building is open 
Monday thru Friday from 5 
p.m. to 8 p.m. and the gym in 
the Recreation building is 
open from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on 
the same days. 

The game room in the 
Student Union is open every 
day from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. at 
night. Here the student can 
rent a pool table for a dollar an 
hour or play foosball. The 
bowling alley is open at the 
same time with the exception 
of a class going on at that 
time. The cost is 50 cents a 
game with shoes rental at 25 
cents. One may pay a 15 dollar 
fee and have free use of the 
alley for the semester. 

So if you can't think of 
anything to do, just look 
around you and discover the 
many activities that are 
awaiting you. 



Students framed 

A photograper for POT- 
POURRI portrait (class) 
pictures will return to the 
Natchitoches campus for four 
days, Nov. 2-5, to shoot those 
students who were unable to 
make appointments for the 
current two-week period. 

Patsy Black, yearbook 
editor, said appointments may 
be made for the four-day 
shooting, from Oct. 25 through 
Monday, Nov. 1. The place and 
times to make appointments 
will be announced later. 

She added that each student 



for the first time will receive 
proofs of their pictures from 
the photographer and be able 
to select the pose he or she 
want to appear in the year- 
book. 

"However, we caution 
students to make their 
selections quickly after 
reciving the proofs," Black 
said. "Our deadlines must be 
respected, and the 
photographer will have to 
choses a pose for the yearbook 
if the student does not do so by 
the date of return requested. 



Ford wins La. poll 



by KEN LANDRY 

" If the presidential election 
were held today, Jimmy 
Carter would be in the White 
House," according to George 
Gallup, president of The 
Gallup Poll. 

But which candidate will 
carry Louisiana? 

In the last three presidential 
elections the Republican 
Party has carried both 
Louisiana and the South. 
However, Carter is leading 
Ford in the South by a two to 
one margin, according to the 
last Gallup Poll. 

So, will we see a change in 
the voting behavior of 
Louisianians in November? 

Perhaps not 

President Ford seems to be 
well ahead of Carter in Loui- 
siana. 

When KNOE TV released 
the results of a poll they had 
taken Sept. 24, Ford was well 



Ski trip planned 
for NSU alumni 

The Northwestern State 
University Alumni 
Association is sponsoring in 
January a one-week ski 
vacation to Telluride, Colo., 



Alpha Beta Alpha 
plans conference 

NSU's seventh annual 
Teenage Media Conference 
will be conducted Oct. 20 
under the sponsorship of the 
NSU chapter of Alpha Beta 



which 
most 



is 



one of the nation's Alpha national library science 



When you think 
of men swear.... 
think of Jfc 



[Capuan , » 



popular ski resorts, fraternity. 



Participants in the winter 
vacation will leave for 
Colorado on Jan. 2 at 1 a.m. 
from Prather Coliseum on the 
NSU campus and will return 
to the University on Jan. 9. 

Alumni, members of the 
faculty and staff of the 
university and others are 
being invited to participate in 
the unique ski trip to Colorado. 

Dr. C. B. Ellis, assistant to 
the president and director of 
external affairs at Nor- 
thwestern, said the cost per 
person for the trip will be $180. 
Included in the cost are the 
round trip bus transportation 
to Colorado, five nights 
lodging at Telluride Lodge and 
five days of skiing. 

Ellis said rental of ski 
equipment, meals and private 
or group lessons are not in- 
cluded in the charge being 
assessed by the Alumni 
Association for the ski trip. 

Reservations are now being 
accepted on the first-come, 
first-served basis. Alumni and 
faculty and staff members 
making reservations for the 
trip must be received no later 
than Oct. 15. 

Coordinating the ski trip is 
Jim Pierson, president of the 
Natchitoches chapter of the 
Northwestern Alumni 
Association. 

Pierson said, "We are 
confident that a number of 
alumni will take advantage of 
this unusual winter vacation 
opportunity being offered by 
the alumni association. 



Located next to Broadmoor Shopping Center 



More than 400 students from 
some 40 high schools through- 
out the state have been invited 
to participate in the conf- 
erence, which includes 
workshop sessions in John S. 
Kyser Hall on the university 
campus. 

Topics to be discussed 
during two morning workshop 
sections are the processing 
and care of library materials, 
activities for Book Week and 
National Library Week, both 
sharing techniques, bulletin 
boards and displays, public 
relations and the student 
assistant, library club act- 
ivities and organization, 
audio-visual services and the 
student assistant, and the 
training of student assistants. 

The theme of this year's 
conference is "campaign 76: 
Make Media Your Choice." 
This theme will be em- 
phasized during each of the 
conference's eight workshop 
sessions. 



Hay mon, Christine Her 
Brenda Holland, Q| 
Johnson, Sheila Posey, 
Rabalais, and Janet Ru 

Peabody MagnatH 
Elizabeth Andrews, v«]J 
Bond, John Fenceroy, ^ 
Melony Hedrick, and 
Ann Simon. 

Weaver Elementary, 
Anne Andries, Kathy ] 
Sherry Salter, Lydia 
Debrah G. Bennett, 
Brossett, Mary Dale, ] 
Federick, Cynthia Chat 
Brenda Dyson, Cathy 
Jeneau, Karen MarcanJ 
Sharon Trisler, Joan 
Wallace, and Vickie Pro, 

North Natchitoch, 
Elementary— Jo Anne 
dries and Sharon Trisler. 

Northwestern Junior 
Jack D. Antilly, Bobby 
Manasco. 

Natchitoches Central 
School— Jack D. Antillt 
Denise Bandy, Brenda s Vol 
Carroll, Eugene Dixon, Jo| 
Laborde, Jeannette Prim 
Denise Veuleman, Cyntl$^ n # M * 
Echenhofer, Martha Guntt 
Lawrence Lambert, Bob 
Ray Manasco. 

Nachman Elementary 
Sherri Arnold, Cai 
Patrick, Susan Holt, 
Hedrick. 

Southwood High— Ji 
Bunke, Shane Bordi 
Daniel Bell, Jr., 
Carson, Terri McConnf^ 
Irving Perry, Jacquel 




LXI 



F 




by 

isions 
ents and 

of discu 
r in the 
Dinting 
along at a 



Highlighting the meeting, strong, Mary Terracine, i fzJJjjLli.in 
which begins at 8 a.m. with ^mas. ^ u J ™ 

registration, will be tours of 
Eugene P. Watson Memorial 
Library and a luncheon ad- 
dress by Monica Watson vice 
president of the Alpha Beta 
Alpha chapter at NSU. The 
theme of Miss Watson's 
presentation will be "Get Out 
and Vote— for Books." 

A special meeting for 
librarians and other 
professional personnel at- 
tending the conference will be 
held during the morning 
sessions. 



ahead of Carter in the Monroe 
area. 

A New Orleans newspaper 
said that President Ford has 
picked up support in south 
Louisiana with his recent trip 
there. 

While on that trip President 
Ford said , "The Republicans 
will carry some Southern 
states in Novem- 
ber." "We are en- 
couraged in Virginia, 
Louisiana, and Mississippi." 

In a poll taken here on 
campus, Ford picked up 83.3 
of the vote to Carter's 16.7 
when students were asked who 
they thought would win the 
election. And when those 
polled were asked about the 
results of the first debate, 80 of 
them said that Ford was more 
impressive. 

So, if these polls are ac- 
curate, it appears that 
President Ford will take 
Louisiana. 



Bonnette to serve 
in program 

Dr. Vern Bonnette, a 
supervising teacher in the ele- 
mentary laboratory school at 
NSU, has been granted a 
year's leave of absence to 
serve as a clinical professor in 
the North Louisian National 
Reading Improvement 
Program. 



Co-chairmen of this year's 
conference are Craig Kubic 
and Marilyn McConnel. 
Working with them on the 
steering committee for the 
event are Stephanie Davitt, 
Sherry Anderson, Linda 
Williams, Annabel Bozeman, 
Donna Lawrence, Terri 
Pearce, and Miss Watson. -30- 



irong, sau 
.Fletcher a 
bt the sake 
tie sake of 
two bask 



The program is the only one 
of its kind in the nation and 
was formed by an 
organization of schools 
representing the parishes of 
Jackson, Lincoln, Ouachita, 
Richland and Winn. 



NSU lists fall 

student teachers 

Eighty-seven education 
majors at NSU are fulfilling 
their student teaching 
requirements this fall in 
elementary, junior and senior 



Alexandria Senior what 
Barbara Bodin, Phil Bon^ Kwhencor 
Emma Ellerman, Jose l ntuation 
Moreau, Randy Pric fte choice j 
LaRayne M. Prothro, Wil M mQng 
Wilson, Jr k consequ 

Brame Junior High— Veil , lThe nc 

Bond, Phil Kenneth Borddjj cansom 

Winnfield Senior Hi| 
Carol R. Breed, Pami 
Dushan, Douglas Noi 
Albert Perine, Warren 
Parks Elementary- 
Bunker, Peggy Hemphir r , 
Linda Payton, Ruby flre . 
son, Juanlta Stanly ^sotcm 

Leesville High-Janice * 
DeBelevue, Laverne Jacto p A 
Janet Manuel, Marcia Mof \J J\ 
George Smith, James Smi 

Caddo Heights Elem arj b V 
June Landers, Joyce I* «* runoff 
Patty McGinty, SW"" and Sa 
Traveler. * for 

Pineville High-Pa* 'turnout w 

Nolen, Judy Rone. 200 votin 8 
Woocflawn High-Hapi 'new com 
Phillips, Katherine Pier Riming , 
Lillian Priest, Lef 17 *-yes, 2. 



Robinson, Jack Zator. 



Dr. Bonnette said the 
purpose of the project is to 
strengthen elementary 
reading programs in North 
Louisiana. It is also designed 
to unite the efforts of school 
systems, universities and the 
State Department of 
Education in developing 
reading skills and models of 
exemplary reading practices. 

The program utilizes four 
clinical professors whose 

:oncern is t 
theory into practice through 
demonstration as opposed to 
lecture relative to teaching 
methodology. 

Clinical professors in the 
program will be Dr. Bonnette, 
Dr. Carolyn Talton of La. Tech 
and Grambling University, 
Dr. Anna Ham of Northeast 
and Dr. Virginia Melton of the 
State Department of 
Education. 



Dr. W. Avery Philp, 
professor of education and 
director of NSU student 
teaching program, said the 
students assumed teaching 
assignments on Aug. 24 and 
will continue in their practical 
experience work through Dec. 
10. 

Public schools which are 
participating in Nor- 
thwestern's student teaching 
program are Kerr Elemen- 



tonstitution 
Selection a 
irtmary ele< 
lor three co 
tot Sauce. 



Integrity Club 
lists plans forftM* runoff 

r , K Pitty 

The Integrity Club "J Bay Gingl 
high schools in North Central organization f people * lining the 
Louisiana, tegrity throughout the «Jl was Mar 

We are part of *" 
ternational group with *w 
home base in Colorado, j 
local branch of the Inw W^M 
Club is based at NSU_ ' M. ^ 
president is David Was* 1 
secretary is Mary Kay S* flowing s 
and faculty advisor is 'WaylnCu 

John Waskom. 
The Integrity Quboffe^ this! It 

series of classes this P^T* 11 305 - ^ 

which were initiated * ? r °° mbec 
presentation from ^ J^wer 

cuiuvw piuiraauia muumn pru&raiu are mit ciemen- nationally known sp* "r7 
primary concern is to relate tary in Bossier City; Peabody George Emery. This ye* , J ° f f 
th^rv into nmrtice throuffh Magnate, Alexandria Senior Integrity Club is iniO'L.. 18 men 

High, Nachman Elementary 
and Brame Junior High in 
Alexandria; Weaver will be appealing and * 
Elementary, North Nat- 
chitoches Elementary, North- 
western Junior High, Nat- 
chitoches Central High School 
and Parks Elementary in 
Natchitoches; Southwood and will run for a P*| 
High School, Caddo Heights 
Elementary and Woodlawn 
High School in Shreveport; 
Winnfield Senior High School 
in Winnfield; Leesville High 
School in Leesville and 
Pineville High School 
Pineville. The 
education 



another new series 
presentations which 



*lf hemigl 
„e c L 0v er em 
: , c ii ^ble disp 



for a variety of people 
The 



»h ir, *asgivei 
meetings, whicn b 

begin Thursday, Sept* rv- 71 
30,willbeheldintheS^ViVli 

Union, Room 316 at 7^ } 



"The long range goal of the 
program," Dr. Bonnette 
stated, "is to branch out each 
year until all parish systems, 
universities and the State 
Department of Education are 
working closely together 
through sharing, planning and 
continuous staff development 
to improve reading programs 
in every school in Louisiana." 



presentations will be *»v £ *senc. 
Spt.^pireU^e^AM, 

movie, 



in 

following 
majors at Nor- 
thwestern have been assigned 
student teaching positions for 
the fall semester. 

Kerr Elementary— Clair 
Almand, Yvonne Fisher, John 



Design I; Oct. Spi^ 
Magic of Design H; J* ^ 
Patterns of Growth > b about 
Development of J?!?^*™ 



Oct. 
Our 



Our 

Children ; 



ponsibi^i^. " 

Oct- T^ood in 

- NU 5 Which 
H; Nov. U^nesisjf^ 

Creative ProcessI; *J F 
Genesis and the 



Nutrition I; Nov.4- ^ "A 
11-Genesis « 



°o exhibit 



Man Call, 



cu 
sur 



Process U. 



A Man 




Sen. Brooke speaks Thursday 



iristine Hei 
island, 
ila Posey, 
1 Janet Ri 

Ma 
ndrews, v«i 
Fenceroy, a 
•ick, and 

Elementary 
i, Kathy 
r, Lydia 
Bennett, 
ry Dale, 
Tithia Cha 
on, Cathy 
ren Marcantj 
isler, Joai 
1 Vickie Proc^ 

Natchitochi 
—Jo Anne 
laron Trisler 
ern Junior 
illy, Bobby 

les Central 
k D. Antilli 

dy, Brenda sjvol. LXIV, No. 5 
;ene Dixon, Ji 



by Muffett Richardson 
United States Senator Edward W. 
Brooke of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts will speak Oct. 14 at 2 
p.m. in the Fine Arts Auditorium. 

Senator Brooke, first elected to 
Congress in 1966, was reelected in 1972 
for the term expiring in January, 1979 
by a plurality of 682,654 votes. He is a 
member of the American Bar 
Association and the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences. 

Sen. Brooke has been the recipient of 
the Spingam Medal from the NAACP 
and received the Charles Evans Hughes 
Awards from the National Conference 
of Christians and Jews. He received 
both of these awards in 1967. 



Sen. Brooke, who attended Dunbar 
High School in Washington, D.C., is the 
recipient of thirty honorary degrees 
from colleges and universities. He 
attended the Boston University Law 
School where he was editor of the "Law 
Review." There he earned a Bachelor 
of Laws Degree in 1948 and a Master of 
Laws Degree in 1950. In 1941 Sen. 
Brooke earned his Bachelor of Science 
at Howard University. 

Sen. Brooke holds five committee 
assignments and serves on ten sub- 
committees. He works on Banking, 
Housing and Urban Affairs; Ap- 
propriations; Select Committee on 
Standards and Conduct; Special 
Committee on Aging; Joint Committee 
on Defense Production and is chairman 



of the Board of Directors for the 
American Revolution Bicentennial 
Administration Committee. 

The subcommittees Sen. Brooke 
serves on includes Housing and Urban 
Affairs (as the ranking minority 
member), Securities (as the ranking 
minority member), Consumer Affairs, 
Financial Institutions and Oversight. 
All of these fall under the Banking, 
Housing and Urban Affairs Committee. 

Sen. Brooke is active in five sub- 
committees under the Appropriations 
Committee. They include Foreign 
Operations (as ranking minority 
member); Labor, Health, Education 
and Welfare (as ranking minority 
member); HUD and Independent 
Agencies; State, Justice, Commerce, 



and the Judiciary; and Military Con- 
struction. 

From 1961-62 Sen. Brooke served as 
chairman of the Finance Commission 
for the city of Boston. He also served as 
Attorney General of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts from 1963- 
67. 

Sen. Brooke's military record in- 
cludes a position of Captain in the U.S. 
Army Infantry during WWII. He has 
five years of active service in the 
European Theater of Operations and 
served with "Partisans" in Italy. Sen. 
Brooke is a recipient of the Bronze Star 
and Combat Infantryman's Badge. He 
has also received a Distinguished 
Service Award for American Veterans 
of WWH from the AMVETS. 




SAUCE 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 



NATCH (TOCHES, LOUISIANA 



October 12. 1976 



lannette Prim 
tleman, 
Martha Guntt 
Lambert, Bot 



extinguished Lecture Series 



Elementary 
mold, Carol 
isan Holt, Hi 



tiane Bordeli , 
11, Jr., Cecl^ 



Fletcher lectures on values 



by Ken Landry 

becisions concerning value 
High-Jcjjnients and moral norms was the 
discussion by Dr. Joseph 
. in the second lecture of the 
erri McConai fl Extinguished Lecture Series, 
rry, Jacquel' 1 
y Terracine, 



'" leaking at an assembly in the Fine 
e ' i Auditorium Friday, Dr. Fletcher 
I the question of how to choose 



Anted th 

* dSd 2 Ken wnat u ri** and what 18 
Jin, Phil Bonk) wnen conironted with a particul- 

pT' Z Mtion - 

♦h wnii "* choice is ^ween rules about 
Prothro, WiM,^ mmg and ^ween ^ cnoice 

Jibe consequences." Which means 
tiior "JJ 1 — 2 I "The normal rules of con- 
Kenneth Bordd L ,.. can sometimes ^0, somethings 
I Senior Rig! ^ „ Sflid ^ richer. 

Breed, P«™ Letcher added, "We tell the truth 
Douglas Non JIjthe gflke ^ tdllng ^ faut 

re, WarrenS* fc sa ke of loving." 
.lementary-De from wWch we 

»eggy Hempj (to choose accor ding to Dr. 
ton, Ruby IW^ are . (1) Deciding whether 
i Stanly . ^ of on i y relatively 

High— Janice 1 

K^S&A announces winners 

th, James Smi 

by Stan Tyler 



valid or absolutely correct on their own 
merits. (2) Do we decide what we ought 
to do in a decision making situation by 
assessing the consequences and 
choosing the one that maximizes the 
one we want or some pre-fabricated 
rule. 

Dr. Fletcher listed three modes of 
approach to the two basic issues. They 
are (1) legalistic, (2) spontaneous and 
(3) situational. 

Explaining the legalistic approach 
Fletcher said that it is rule or duty 
ethics that one is obligated by con- 
science to obey the rule. 

To further explain that Fletcher 
described a hypothetical situation using 
the Ten Commandments and a fron- 
tiersman in early American history. 

The frontiersman learns that the 
Indians are going to stage an attack on 
his family. He gathers his family 
together and hides his four children 
inside the fortification into which he has 



moved. The Indians attack. They find 
one child and "destroy" him. The In- 
dian then turns and asks the fron- 
tiersman if there are any more children 
hiding about. Adh earing to the legalstic 
approach and the Ten Commandments 
it is the frontiersman's duty, according 
to Fletcher, to tell the truth regardless 
of the consequences. 

Fletcher explained the spontaneous 
approach by saying that a person's 
actions are spontaneous. To further 



explain he used as an example two 
factory workers. One worker turned to 
the other and said, you know Tom has 
been having a rough time of it lately. 
Would you lend him $100? The worker's 
response was, I don't know. I'll have to 
wait until he asks me. 

The situational approach is one which 
is somewhere between the legaltistic 
and the spontanious. It is a person who 
on one hand obeys rules yet on the other 
hand has no rules, said Fletcher. 




OR. JOSEPH FLETCHER 



Who's Who lists NSU students 



Rone. 
High-Hapt 



ack Zator. 



tyClub 



rom our past 



ights Elem af 
■rs Joyce Leo lthe runoffs for Freshman class 
'Ginty, Snai "° r 81,(1 Senior class senator and 
Dte for the new SGA constitution, 
! High— Patt r hirnout was very light with less 
"* voting on October 5. 
p new constitution passed with a 
atoerine Pi* * belmin 8 majority. The results 
Priest L* l: 17 *-y es > 21-no. The reason behind 
institution being held over till the 
ft election and not being voted on in 
Wmary election was so it could be 
'or three consecutive weeks in the 
*nt Sauce. 

ins for ft * 6 runoff for Freshman class 
tor, Pitty Cathey won defeating 
rity Club » Ray Gingles and David Pearson, 
of people of bnjng ^ Senior class senator 
ighout the «• (fwas Marvin "Shag" Roque who 
art of an 
group with 
in Colorado 
l of the Intefl 
jed at NSU- 
David WasM 
Mary Kay S* "blowing story appeared five years 
- advisor i* [^'y in Current Sauce.) 
im . y°u think you've got problems, 

rity Club off en » to this! It seems that Albert Rider 
sses this pa* 1 ' f* 1 305 > Bossier Hall couldn't study 
; initiated £ room because of the pictures and 
i from the " * *at were written and drawn on 
known spe* 1 a result, he talked to the 

ery This ye* ^ of the floor he was on, and the 
nub is ini * d 13 charge 01 the building. He 
lew serie» he might get his room painted 
»Wch *e ? Ver embarrassing and un- 
^g and** 1 ** ble Splays of art which had 
' rf people- L° n exhJbit to his room. As usual 
tmgs wnic" ^ * as 8i ven 801116 excuse as to why 

-sday, 
leld in the 
<n3ieat7:*M 

n for apf" Called Horse" is the next 
a. The to^ ^eduled for NSU students in the 
ns will he j « Sciences auditorium. On Oct. 
jiral the Jj 3 "A Man Called Horse" will be 

Oct. SpH* 1, ^ beginning at 7:30 p.m. 
►esign II; °* l mov ie, which stars Richard 
of Grow** 1 * 1 is about an English aristocrat 
ent of Chi 1 * J* captured by the Sioux Indians. 
ResponsiC*^ ^ chance for escape is to prove 
iren • O ct \j it 0O( * m t° e savage culture, an 

Nov 4- * 1 1 Whicn culminates in the ritual 
'-.Genesis *e sun." 
rocessl; de Picts the Sioux life and 

ind the' ^ 1 tbe wav ^ Indians actually 
^Uring this time in history in 
A Man Called Horse" occurs. 



defeated Debbie Mayeaux. 

The next election to be held on 
campus will be on Tuesday, Oct. 12, for 
the purpose of electing a state fair 
court. There are 19 beauties competing 
for the court of nine. Of the nine elected, 
the contestant receiving the most votes 
will be the queen. 

The nineteen nominees are : Lorraine 
Billeadeaux, Lissa Parson, Cindy 
Etheridge, Cammie Hargis, Mary Lyn 
Bartek, Cheryll Purcell, Lola Camons, 
Tina DeViller, and Liz Posey. Also, 
Sherry Anderson, Debbie Page, Patty 
Harvey, Donna King, Ronda Baham, 
Marlene Fogleman, Suzanne Willis, 
San da Wells, Mania Straham, and 
Jane Thompson. 



Northwestern State University 
received notice recently that 47 of its 
upper classmen students had been 
named to the 1976-77 Who's Who Among 
Students in American Universities and 
Colleges. 

This is aan honor bestowed annually 
(since 1934) on campus leaders for 
scholastic and community 
achievement. 

NSU students are nominated for this 
award by fe and campus organizations 
in the spring. Students nominated have 



contributed to NSU, participated in 

various organizations, and rendered 

service to the school community in 
general. 

NSU students recognized this year for 
the Who's Who Among Students in 
American Universities and Colleges 
are Mary Ackel, Rory Alexander, 
Sherry Anderson, Julia Beeson, Louise 
Bonin, Frances Byrne, Spring Cloud, 
William Curry, Clinton Davis, Jeff 
Delaune, Vicki Downing, Terry Downs, 
Jo Ford, Veronica Hart, Debbie 
Hawkins, Stan Haynes, Christine 



Herring, Barbara Hogeboom, Bryce 
Jackson, Lane Johnson, Debra Kilman, 
Donna King, Susan McCaleb, William 
McKellar, Sharon Mack, Rick Mooney, 
Vernelda Morning, Patricia Nolen, 
Colette Oldmixon, Sheila Posey, Vickie 
Procell, Cheryl Purcell, Mike Rabalais, 
James Radial, Linda Robinson, Marvin 
Roque, Joani Rosenthal, Jan Russell, 
John Russell, Barton Sealy, Cereece 
Smith, George Smith, Diane Villard, 
Jarja Wells, Frederick Wiley, Rodney 
Wise and Stuart Wright. 



The two alternates named are David 
Hughston and Laura Langston. 

NSU is one of 11,000 institutions of 
higher learning who nominate students 
for this honor. The number of students 
each school can nominate is deter- 
mined by the enrollment. 

The National Office will send each 
student a form to fill out and return. 
Prompt compliance in filling out and 
returning this material will enable 
them to meet their publishing deadline. 



SUGB plans concert 



S ovie slated 



his room could not be painted. Every 
night, Albert had to sit there and look at 
nude women and bad words, of which 
he did not approve. Being a Christian, 
and not liking what he saw, Albert 
bought himself some paint and went to 
work. When he finished, the room 
looked better than it had in years. 

One afternoon, Albert and his 
roommate had company. It appears 
that the lady who pretends to mop the 
rooms every morning, had told on him. 
All at once, he had the attention which 
should have been his at first. He 
thought he had done no wrong, but it 
seems that the people who are supposed 
to be in charge of Bossier Hall thought 
he had committed a crime. To correct 
this crime, he was told to pay $40. 

Albert did not like this idea, and so he 
went to talk to the director of housing 
about this situation. He was told there 
to pay the $40 and they sent a man over 
to the room to give an estimation of how 
much it would cost to repair the 
damage. What do you know? This man 
thought $40 might cover the damage. 

Is this a sample of students' rights? If 
it is, what will happen to us next? The 
fact remains that we were not told that 
we could not paint our rooms? Did 
someone neglect their duties, or did 
they care at all? 



"Caring is Love and to me. ..that's 
what it's all about," according to Richie 
Lecea, an accomplished singer, 
songwriter and guitar player who will 
appear on campus Monday, October 25 
at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Auditorium. 

Lecea, called a surprise treat at 
concerts where he has performed, sees 
himself as an entertainer. "As a 
recording artist, I'm trying to evoke 
emotions from the listerner and I'm 
hoping the things I'm saying will make 
them take notice." 

Lecea has played with Shango, the 
group which released the national hit 
"Day after Day." Lecea's debut solo 
album "Magic" showed two distinct 
sides of his talent— ballads and up- 
tempo songs. He also has a second 
album out called "It's all done with 
Mirrors." 

This talented performer has played 



warm-up music for the concert of such 
greats as David Loggins, Jose 
Feliciano, Linda Ronstadt and Barry 
Manilow. Each one of his appearances 
has surprised and delighted his 
audiences. His performances leave 
crowds asking for his return. 

A native of California, Lecea feels 
"stars have a responsibility to share 
their gifts. "My whole life is devoted to 
writing and performing tunes for 
people." 

Lecea has written more than 40 songs 
with his wife, Lynn. Chubby Checker 
recently recorded one of his songs 
called "She's a Bad Woman." 

The concert, sponsored by Big Name 
Entertainement, promises unusual and 
talented performer in Richie Lecea. 

Students will be admitted to the 
concert with their IDS and tickets for 
non-students will cost $2. 




RICHIE LECEA 



Play opens Wednesday 



The first major production of the NSU 
Theatre Season, ' "Who's Happy 
Now?" opens tomorrow night at 7:30 in 
the NSU Little Theatre. The Box Office 
is open 1-5 p.m. Monday-Friday and the 
number is 357-4179. NSU students will 
be admitted with ID. Tickets for faculty 
and staff are 50 cents. Faculty and staff 
members may also purchase their 
Season Tickets during Box Office hours 
through Friday. 

"Who's Happy Now?" is a comedy 
set in a barroom in the small Texas 
town of Sunray. It is by Oliver Hailey 
and is under the direction of Ray 
Schexnider. 

The cast includes Bill Adger, Bob 
Gilmore, Sally Levasseur, Rick Bar- 
nickle, Ginni Lelong, and Kay 
Baumartner. 

"Who's Happy Now?" is NSU's entry 
in the American College Theatre 
Festival. Last year NSU's production of 



David Rabe's, "Sticks and Bones," won 
the state competition and went on to 
represent Louisiana in the regional 
contest in Fort Worth. 

The American College Theatre 
Festival is an annual event presented 
by the John F. Kennedy Center for the 
Performing Arts and the Alliance for 
Arts Education. It is produced by the 
American Theater Association and 
sponsored by Amoco Oil Company. 



A representative from South Central 
Bell will be on campus Tuesday, Oct. 19 
from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. The purpose of 
his visit is to take applications from 
Stan Cards (Student Telephone Account 
Number.) All on-campus students need 
a Stan Card if they intend on making 
long distance direct calls. 

The representative will be located in 
Room 310 of the Student Union. 



Cancellation 

Due to unforeseen circumstances and 
negative reactions the KA Pie Day 
which was to have been held Thursday, 
Oct. 21 , has been cancelled. 

Dance 

NSU's annual Wreck Tech Dance has 
been scheduled for October 21 in the 
Student Union Ballroom. "Delta 
Queen" will be the band for the evening 
presenting a wide variety of current 
soul, rock and boogie for the pleasure of 
those in attendance. 

The dance will begin at 8 p.m. and 
will continue until 12 midnight. Any 
student with an I.D. and his or her date 
will be admitted. Dress casual and 
come for an evening of fun and dancing. 

Hot Sauce 



Why does a certain fraternal 
organization get to leave their table in 
the cafeteria instead of putting it up like 
every one else? 



Everyone is urged to clean up their 
table after they are through eating. 
Everyone includes members of I 
fraternities, members of sororities, 
independents, athletes, and anyone else 
who eats in the cafeteria. The problem 
is not just with one small group. 



Referendum 



The Student Government Association 
has announced a student referendum in 
which students will be able to vote as to 
whether they would like to raise student | 
fees to fund two seperate agencies. 

Two propositions are to be con-| 
sidered. 

Proposition one would increase 
student fee assessments by $.25 per 
semester to fund a cheerleader agency 
account for use by the NSU 
Cheerleaders. 

Proposition two would increase the 
student fee assessments for KNWD-FM 
to $2.00 per semester. 

The propositions will be considered 
by students on Oct, 27. 



Page 2 CURRENT SAUCE October 12, 1976 



CO> s Corner Readers comment on issues 
^"^^ ^"'^ ^^^^ (Editor's note: In our mainritv Aninvorl it 1 MA a*,, ^ » o »u- - n rj;. 



This week has been declared 
Newspaper Week all across 
the country. I would not be a 
true journalist if I let this 
opportunity pass without 
saying something about some 
phase of the newspaper field. 

Until recently, a reporter 
typed his story on sheets of 
paper and handed them to his 
editor to read. After it passed 
the editor's inspection and 
close scrutiny, the story was 
sent back to the print shop to 
be set into galleys, otherwise 
known as trays of set type 
which compose the pages. 

Today, in this eraof the 
space age, newspapers are 
keeping abreast of the times. 
Computers have come into 
their own in the field. 

The New York Press has the 
industry's most advanced 
automation and electronic 
technology employed by any 
newspaper. 

Because of a device called a 
Harris cathode ray tube, 
editors have direct control of 
news copy every step of the 
way from the reporters; input 
to the final page proofs. 

(I quote the following from a 
news release about the New 
York Press.) 

"It works like this: 

A reporter returning from 
an assignment will "write his 
copy on a video typewriter. He 
won't need copy paper, pencil, 
glue pot, or even have to strike 
out mistakes. 

A little larger than an or- 
dinary typewriter, the 
"Harris 2500" CRT typewriter 
is equipped with a standard 
keyboard. The reporter's 
story is displayed on the 
screen in front of him as he 
writes it. The copy is 
hyphenated and justified 
automatically and instantly. 
Correcting is done by striking 



over a word with new 
characters, erasing the error 
from the screen as the correct 
character appears. It's all 
done in micro-seconds. 

The writer can recall any of 
his copy to his screen to revise 
or rewrite prior to sending it to 
the computer memory bank. 
Editors retrieve the story on 
their video screens for final 
editing, updating, additions, 
and headline writing. 

When the copyediting is 
completed, the news editor 
presses a "set it" button and 
the story is set by high speed 
computerized 
phototypesetters. 

The computer also holds 
stories which have been 
slugged to a specific category 
such as national news, 
financial, sports, women's 
page, etc., and accurately 
measures and reports each 
story's length for makeup. 

Proofreading is completed 
before type is set since the 
final output is seen on the 
video tube. Phototypesetters 
are not subject to the 
mechanical errors inherent in 
hot metal linecasters." 

This is only on example of 
the many pieces of equipment 
which have been spawned by 
the space age and make 
newspaper production easier, 
faster and more accurate. 

Of course, I am glad of the 
new technology, but I am also 
happy not to be in that rat 
race. Things seem to move too 
fast— micro-seconds. 

Actually, this is only one 
phase of the newspaper field. 
There is more to paper 
production than typing a 
story. That is where the true 
challenge is— going out and 
collecting the news, making a 
scoop, or just the experience 
of learning something you 
didn't know before. 



FOOTBALL 
CORSAGE 

NSU VS LA. TECH GAME 

CORSAGES CONTAIN: 

★ A Gorgeous Mum 

★ Purple ft White Streamers 

★ NSU Demons Printed on Streamers 

★ Football ft Cowbell 

Prie. $ 6.00 

POSEY MART FLORIST OF SHREVEPORT WILL BE 
STATIONED, AS USUAL, BESIDE THE STATE FAIR 
STADIUM WHERE YOUR FRESH CORSAGE WILL BE 
PREPARED AND WAITING. 



As a journalist, I get a 
chance to learn something 
new every day and that is 
what makes it all worthwhile. 
I know that some people think 
that you have to be a little 
insane to be a reporter. I do 
not find this the case though it 
does help to have a healthy 
sense of humor. 

There was some misin- 
formation in the story on 
recreational activities at NSU. 
The Games Area in the 
Student Union is open on 
Saturdays and Sundays from 
1-10 p.m. Students may rent a 
pool table with the cost being 
computed as to the number of 
players and the time. The $15 
fee charged the bowling 
classes only covers use of the 
alleys for instructional time 
during class. Any further use 
of the alley must be paid for. 

★★★★ 

Boy, I almost forgot! Today, 
484 years ago, an Italian, 
seemingly insignificant at the 
time, named Christopher 
Columbus sighted land on the 
horizon. Sailing under the 
Spanish flag of Ferdinand and 
Isabella, Columbus 
discovered for Spain unknown 
lands which were to be the 
source of wealth and contr- 
oversy to this day. 

On October 12, 1492, 
Christopher Columbus, 
commanding the Nina, the 
Pinta and the Santa Maria, 
landed on an island in the 
Carribean, setting in motion a 
period of colonization which 
would give birth to countries 
such as Canada and the United 
States of America. 

As we celebrate our 
bicentennial we should salute 
the man whose determination 
and curiosity played a part in 
our country's discovery. 

SGA 

at a glance 

October 4, 1976 
SGA Minutes 

The Northwestern Senate 
was called to order on October 
4, 1976 by Bob Ryder at 6:35 
p.m. Absent were Johnson, 
and Pittard. 

Walker announced a Student 
Services Committee meeting 
for Wednesday, October 6, 
1976. Dyess discussed parking 
at the Student Union. 

NEW BUSINESS 

Lynch moved to ajourn. 
Nugent seconded. Meeting 
adjourned at 6:45 p.m. 

Respectfully Submitted 
Debbie Page 
Senate Clerk 





If you want to capture 
someone's attention, 
whisper. 



COTY 




TWO NEW 
TRAVEL- 
PERFECT 

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darumw a pfjarmarg 

Broadmoor Shopping Center, Natchitoches, Louisiana 

PHONE 352-4582 



(Editor's note: In our 
masthead we state that letters 
to the editor are invited, that 
they must be signed, that 
names will be withheld upon 
request, and that they should 
be no more than 500 words to 
be considered for publication. 
The letters printed here do not 
reflect the personal, editorial 
or administrative views on 
any issue. They are simply 
statements made by students 
on campus and they are 
printed as such.) 

Dear Editor: 

In regard to last week's 
Current Sauce I wish to ex- 
plain my reasoning behind the 
change of my vote from yes to 
no. I was unaware of the 
hostile feeling that prevailed 
throughout this campus 
concerning fees and the radio 
station. After voting yes I was 
confronted by many students 
regarding my decision. I 
changed my mind because I 
felt the vote of no increase was 
the majority feeling among 
the students. 

I think this matter could be 
handled in an entirely differ- 
ent way. Has the radio station 
ever thought about selling 
enough advertisements to pay 
its own bill? The students, as I 
found by talking to many, are 
sick and tired of outrageous 
fees. In case you didn't know, 
it's cheaper to go to LSU than 
it is to Northwestern. 

Although I think the radio 
station is an asset to the 
university I feel obligated to 
say no to any increase for the 
student body. 

Sincerely yours, 
Senator Danny Dyess 



Dear Editor: 

In reference to comments 
made in last week's issue of 
the Current Sauce pertaining 
to the immaturity and 
disrespect shown by blacks at 
a recent SUGB movie 
presentation, it always 
mystifies me the degree to 
which some people allow bias 
to influence objectivity. 

Perhaps I am too naive, but 
I felt we as a society had 
progressed intellectually 
beyond the point of using 
generalities in expressing our 
opinion. In the past such usage 
has done more harm than 
good, and I am sure this will 
be no exception. At both 
movies I attended there 
seemed to be very vocal 
responses from the majority 
in attendance (both blacks 
and whites). We all express 
our emotions differently, 
more because we are in- 
dividuals rather than a 
member of a particular group. 

Each time I left the movie 
with the impression that the 



majority enjoyed it. I did say 
MAJORITY. In a society 
supposedly based on majority 
rule, it seems that anyone 
wanting to restrict others 
from enjoying something in 
the lawful manner in which 
they please is the one showing 
disrespect. 

I do not deny anyone their 
rights, but these rights are not 
intended to benefit one person 
at the expense of a hundred 
others. On night I would like to 
go to bed without my room- 
mate coming in noisily just 
before dawn waking me; 
however, it is his right to come 
in whenever he pleases. 

We do not live in this world 
alone. Perhaps some of us 
have yet to realize that fact. 

The movie presentations 
(thank you, SUGB) are in- 
tended to add to the students 
social activities, not to his 
disciplinary curriculum. 

Jackie Williams 



Dear Editor: 

I would like to say that I also 
have been a part of this in- 
stitution for three years. 
During the three years that I 
have been here, this univer- 
sity has gone through a vast 
number of changes. I strongly 
feel, along with many other 
black students, that a lot of 
these changes are aimed at 
the black students. 

Being a minority group on 
campus, the blacks are a 
closely knitted group. But 
since the black enrollment is 
increasing, the rules and 
regulations have become a lot 
stricter. Things have gotten so 
bad that ever time blacks get 
together to converse, Campus 
Security arrives on the scene 
with some report of a 
distrubance. 

• " W- #■ ■• ' •' 

. ■> ■ .-4. *:f ' r . > 

There was an incident not 
too long ago in which I was 
involved where a few guys and 
I were sitting under a tree in 
front of Sabine talking. We 
weren't there thirty minutes 
before Campus Security 
arrived with a complaint that 
there was a group of black 
males sitting under a tree in 
front of Sabine smoking 
marijuana. 

It was a most 
embarrassing thing standing 
there enptying our pockets 
while people were passing by 
looking at us. It seems as 
though the administration or 
Campus Security is out for the 
black Students. 

As for the incident that 
occured at the showing of 
"The Reincarnation of Peter 
Proud," I must commend the 
"Concerned Student" who 
wrote the article in last week's 



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Current Sauce on the proper 
way to write racial slurs. 

I was sitting in the general 
area in which this person 
spoke of and on both nights of 
the showing there seemed to 
be quite a few white students 
located in this area. And 
whether they were interested 
in the move or not, they made 
their noises and funny com- 
ments. The only way I see that 

anyone could really write such 
mess is that they had to be 
right in the middle of it all. It 
seems as though this person 
was on the outside looking in 
the general area of the so- 
called incident, then they 
couldn't have written this 
trash. 

There seemed to be as 
many whites as there were 
blacks who were "constantly 
making noise." Are they also 
immature? Was it that they 
also couldn't understand what 
was happing? Were the sex 
scenes too shocking or uneasy 
for them? I am inclined to 
believe that before anyone 
attempts to write articles of 
such a nature, that they should 
get the facts straight. 

Although the writer tried to 
be unbiased, they were very 
successful in directing his-her » 
thoughts towards the blacks. I 
strongly hope that in the 
future the Current Sauce will 
refrain from publishing such 
slurs. 

Concerned for my fellow black 
students, 

Jerome D. Fay 



Dear Editor: 

In last week's CURRENT 
SAUCE, I was quite surprised 
to find the letter concerning 
people talking during the 
SUGB movie. While I admit 
there were viewers being 
inconsiderate of those who 
were trying to watch the film, 
it was also rude of the "co Fl- 
eered student" at attack such 
a group with such verbal 
force. 

The "concerned student" 
managed to take what began 
with a group of students 
talking at an inappropriate 
time and build and extend the 
incident through insults into a 
considerable distrubance here 
in Sabine Dormitory. 

While I attended the R.A. 
workshop, we were told of how 
to approach racial 
problems.— I would certainly 
appreciate it if people would 
not resort to name-calling, 
thus causing more problems 
for all. 

If this student was truly 
"concerned," he could have 
used more tact and refrained 
from interjecting so much of 
his personal feeling in what 
should have been an objective 
letter. In fact, I believe that a 
little more tact on the part of 
all people here on campus 
could relieve much of the 
strain which exists. 

People , you've got to realize 
that you are mature adults! 
Please remember this; throw 
away your childish ways now 
that you are at college, and we 
will all be the better and 
happier for it. 

Sincerely 
Stephanie Davitt 



Dear Editor: 

In the interest of calming 
student fears about the lack of 
concerts I would like to let you 
know, "we are working on it 
folks." No, we are not getting 
Tower of Power. We tried but 
our offer was rejected. But 
wait there's good news, we've 

just offered the Beatles $6000 He will also be doing con<C 
plus sound and lights. So hang a t Tech, Southwestern 
in there folks and keep those Nicholls. 



cards and letters coming 
Sammie Rag s < 
V. P. of Entertain^ 

P.S. 

You will enjoy the 
Show. He's an exciting 



that members of 
previewed earlier this 



The 



Third 



I 



¥ 

The Kt 
team ren 
^ e boj beating I 
Sigma d 



H and 



Long away and far ago 

And on a world that moved tooslow, 

There lived a kind of funny man 

Who had a kind of funny hand. 

The hand just sat atop his head 

And waved at all the passing dead 

And sometimes one would come to life 

And shake the hand that eased the strife. 

The man knew not the hand was there 

Some say 'cause he never washed his hair. 

One day I saw him on the street, 

His hair was washed; so neat and clean 

And on the head of this clean man 

There sat a funny drown-ed hand. 

James Carr 





FREEDOM 

OF THE PRESS 



dominate 
Stopped tl 
and allo\ 
complete 
played gc 
scored oi 
Breland 
next sco! 
worked i 
completii 
JfcElwee 
and Barb 
Sig tea 
congratul 
The offei 
points ai 
given up 
game w 
thought v 
KA for I 
came th 
Kappa SI 
strong by 
through 
there was 
15 pulled 
tlemen r: 
pond. Sii 
eiiminatii 
for more 
results, 
semester 
undefeate 
events. \ 
Hketoths 
keg to the 
was held 
war at t! 
would Ilk 
and the 
against 1 
Sign 

Roses o 
recently t 
They an 
president 
vice-presi 
Nicholson 
Han, 
Wartell, 
nan; and 
Robin 1 
chairman 
a car ws 
and Thur 
busy (Join 
guys who 
the slave 
With 1 
proaching 
busy mat 
the week 
possible. 
Sig Ta 
Sigma 2, : 

f 

Delta Zt 
with the ! 
ftaternit 
tober 6, 1 
house. Th< 
team wor 
•his week 
opponent. 

Joani I 
Pointed 
P»rliamei 
Presently 

Current Sauce is the official publication of the student bodf p s , 
Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, Louisiana. Tl U 
newspaper is entered as second class matter at the NatchitochesC Crosley 
Office under an act of March 3, 1879. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday during the fa II and spf'J 
semesters with the exception of holidays and testing periods and 1 
weekly during the summer semester. It is printed at the Natchi!° cW i 
mes, Highway 1 South, Natchitoches, Louisiana 
Editorial offices are located in Room 225, Arts and Scle^T girls 
Building and telephones are 357-5456 and 357 6874, Business. „ 
Opinions expressed in editorial columns are solely those of " 
student editors and do not necessarily represent the viewpoint of ' 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body of Northwestern , p 

Letters to the editor are invited and contributions are solicited^ ^ebratJoi 
students, faculty, and staff and from student organizations Le«J jjj ^ „ 
must be signed and no more than 500 words to be considered T"* 01 w 
publication. Names will be withheld upon request 

The staff of Current Sauce reserves the right to edit all letters 
sake of journalistic style and available space 



' 1 

Current Sauce 



COLETTE OLDMIXON 
Editor 



BOB RYDER 
Managing Editor 



BILL BOSSIER 
Sports Editor 



PAULA JETTON 
News Editor 



OLU AKINRINADE 
Assistant News Editor 

MARK BANDY 
Business Manager 

RODNEY WISE 
Circulation Manager 

MIKE RABALAIS 



RONALD BUZZETTA 
Assistant News Editor 

MARK SMITH 
Advertising Manager 

CRAIG BERTHOLD 
Cartoonist 



FAIRHYAMS 



Photographers 

FRANKLIN PRESSON 
Adviser 



"toney-ma 
Katie Les 
Onager. 



Plans ai 
k our 



KITCH 

COUPON 
SPECIAL 



*&gratula 
king el- 
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« a S 
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PICK UP COUPONS IN STUDENT UNION 
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October 12. 1976 CURRENT SAUCE Page 3 



GX 



<S>M 



A, TTK^ AKIV 

— Greek Review 



and 



life 

strife. 

lere 

his hair, 
clean 



Ties Carr 



\ 



Kappa Sigma 

The Kappa Sigma football 
team remains undefeated by 
beating KA 13-0. The Kappa 
Sigma defense completely 
dominated the game. They 
stopped the KA running attack 
and allowed them only five 
complete passes. The offense 
played good ball control and 
scored on a pass play from 
Breland to Ranger. On the 
next scoring drive the Sigs 
worked it down the field by 
completing passes to Grabner, 
McElwee, Downs, Cattrell, 
and Barten. The whole Kappa 
Sig team needs to be 
congratulated for the season. 
The offense has scored 103 
points and the defense has 
given up only 8. When the 
game was over, everyone 
thought we were through with 
KA for the night, but then 
came the tug-of-war. The 
Kappa Sig team started out 
strong by pulling Spirit of 76 
through the pond and then 
there was KA again. The same 
IS pulled the Southern Gen- 
tlemen right on through the 
pond. Since it was double 
elimination, they came back 
for more but getting the same 
results. So far the Fall 
semester, Kappa Sigs are 
undefeated in all intramural 
events. We would especially 
like to thank KA for donating a 
keg to the victory party which 
was held following the tug-of- 
war at the Bunker Club. We 
would like to wish Coach A.L. 
and the Demons good luck 

against Tech next week. 
Sigma Tau Gamma 

Roses of Sigma Tau Gamma 
recently elected new officers. 
They are Jackie Phillips, 
^president; Barbara Judice, 
Y |J_ X^/J^j vice-president; Mary Alice 
Nicholson, secretary; Rhonda 
Rylan, treasurer; Lucy 
Wartell, fund raising chair- 
man; and Jennifer Karr and 
Robin McDonald, social 
chairman. The Roses also had 
a car wash last Wednesday 
and Thursday They are still 
busy doing their jobs for the 
guys who bought them during 
the slave auction last week. 
With Tech Weekend ap- 
proaching, all the Sig Taus are 
busy making plans to enjoy 
be weekend as much as 
possible. 

Sig Tau defeated Kappa 
Sigma 2, 28-0 this past week. 
Delta Zeta 
Delta Zeta held an exchange 
with the Sigma Tau Gamma 
fraternity Wednesday Oc- 
tober 6, 1976 at the Sig Tau 
house. The intramural football 
team won two more games 
*ls week by forfeit of the 
°Pponent. 

Joani Rosenthal was ap- 
pointed as our new 
Parliamentarian and is 
Presently serving as State 
fair Chairman. Sheila 
frostey was appointed as 
jboney-making chairman and 
*atie Leslie as House Corp. 
Manager. Congratualtions 
Arts. 

Plans are now being made 
•or our Founder's Day 



for the members. 




L BOSSIER 
irts Editor 



BUZZETTA 
News Editor 

< SMITH 
ing Manager 

BERTHOLD 
rtoonist 



iHYAMS 



s student bod* 
, Louisiana. 1 
Natchitoches^ 



dered 



the fa 1 1 andspf 
ng periods and 
t the Natchitoo" 

rts end Sclent* 

Business, 
alely those of 
e viewpoint o* 

Northwestern- - - — j 

are solicited if* ^ebration to be held at the 

nizations. Let* 
oe consi 



edit all letters 



"'in 



*d of October. 
D Z would like to 
*ngratulate Pitty Cathey for 
"^ng elected Freshman 
. ator, Debbie Willie for 
a Sig Tau Rose, and 
Wmtg^E? 1 * 1 Sim P s °n for being 
*°Pped to Buster Brady. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 
-m The Epsilon-Upsilon 

Vter of Tau Kappa Epsilon 
JDl vote tonight on whether or 
* to Initiate Chuck Preston 
New Orleans and Mike 
San of Wiimfield, into TKE. 
i *ey pass, they will be 
"tftiatied next week. 
This Friday the TKE Lil* Sis 
having a "50s" sock hope 



INIONi 
GH 



52 



81 It 



DISCOUNT 
PRINTING 

Bond Copier 

Phone 352-6466 
s J32 St. Denis St. 



1 



I'VE GOT IT!— This 
young man is just 
waiting for the ball to 
descend to his arms 
during the Sigma Tau 
Gamma-Kappa Sigma 
flag football game. 

Pi Kappa Phi 

The Beta Omicron Chapter 
of Pi Kappa Phi has just 
completed a very successful 
week in intramural football. 
On Monday, Oct. 4, we 
defeated Sigma Tau Gamma 
12-6 and last Wednesday we 



defeated Phi Beta Sigma. The 
football team now has a 
record of four wins and no 
losses. 

This past Thursday, the 
brothers helped the Nat- 
chitoches Chamber of Com- 
merce deliver the new city 
maps to the local businesses. 
Saturday night we had a party 
after the Nicholls State game 
at White Columns Clubhouse. 
We have plans for parties 
for Tech weekend and 
Homecoming. 

The chapter would like to 
thank the Natchitoches Fire 
Department for fixing the 
flagpole. 

Phi Mu 

Last Monday night after the 
pledge meeting, the actives 
surprised the pledges. Then, 
in a candlelight ceremony, the 
identities of their Big Sisters 
were revealed to them. 

On Saturday, October 9, we 
held a fund-raising rummage 
sale at Dixie Plaza Shopping 
Center. Also, we sold sand- 
wiches on the front lawn of the 
Well's home during the 
Natchitoches Tour of Historic 
Homes. Mrs. Carol Wells, the 
owners of the old home, is a 
Phi Mu alumni. 

This week promises to be a 
very busy one for the Phi Mus. 
On Thursday, after the Pep 
Rally we will have a chapter 
exchange with KA. Then on 
Friday night all the Phi Mus 



will attend the Phi Mu 
Hawkins Dance." 



Theta Chi 

The Eta Omicron chapter of 
Theta Chi wishes to congrat- 
ulate all of the other frater- 
nities on their rushes. 

The chapter pledged 8 
people and has been educating 
them on the Greek life. The 
pledges are: Robert 
Alexander, Kenny Clark, 
Tommy Doucet, Robert 
Chauvin, Scott Dumbar, 
Moaveni Siamak, Dan 
O'Leary and Lee Bennette. 

The chapter has high hopes 
for the pledges. Members are 
looking forward to Tech 
Weekend and the annual toilet 
bowl pageant and game in 
Shreveport. The chapters 
workday and dinner at the 
house on greek hill were all 
successful. Members are 
looking forward to a very 
successful semester. 

Kappa Alpha 

The brothers of Kappa 
Alpha Order wished the 
football team good luck 
against Nicholls State. A 
champagne party was held 
after the game. Plans have 
been made for State-Fair 
weekend. The KAs will have 
reservations at the Captain 
Shreve Hotel. Parties are 
scheduled for Friday and 
Saturday night. Tickets for the 




Saturday party to be held at 
the Civic Center are on sale . 
For further information 
contact any KA. "Earth" will 
provide the music. 

The interfraternity football 
team defeated TKE handily 
and is preparing for Kappa 
Sigma 1. Both teams are 
undefeated and it should be a 
great game. 

Kappa Alpha Psi 

The brothers of the Theta 
Lambda Chapter of Kappa 
Alpha Psi held a car wash at 
the East Natchitoches branch 
of the Exchange Bank on 
October 9, 1976 

Civic projects the brothers 
are currently undertaking 
include a membership drive 
for the Natchitoches Voters 
League and holiday parties for 
children at the North Street 
Day Care Center. 

The Diamond Club of Kappa 
Alpha Psi will meet tonight at 
7:30 in the Student Union. All 
young men interested in 
learning more about the 
fraternity are asked to attend. 
For further information 
contact Emitte Rogue at 
phone number 352-5283. 

The brothers would like to 
congratulate the Demon's 
offensive and defensive 
players of the week for their 
performances in last week's 
football game. Continued good 
luck to the entire Demon 
team. 



Spirit of '76 earns spot in playoffs 



by KEN LANDRY tramural flag football play- Baxter Welch on a 50 yard 
The Spirit of '76 came from offs Thursday. pass play. The extra point 

behind to defeat PEK 14-6 and PEK was first to score when attempt failed and the score 
earned a spot in the in- Ken Wood connected with stood at 6-0 at the end of the 






RECORDING ARTIST— Becky 
Hobbs, a fresh new sound on the 
music scene, will be interviewed 
over the air on KNWD this Thursday 
at 8 p.m. She will talk of her new 
single which is predicted to hit the 



Top 40 Charts. Becky has an album 
out called "From the Heartland." 
Chuck Cason, KNWD general 
manager, says this is a first for the 
NSU radio station. 



first half. 

The Spirit of '76, on their 
first possession in the second 
half, took the ball on their own 
20 yard line and marched it 
down to the PEK 24 on a series 
of short runs up the middle by 
running back Tim Fontenot. 
Facing a fourth down and four 
yards to go for a first down, 
quarterback Dusty Landry 
connected on a pass with tight 
end Mark Gremillion at the 17. 
Two plays later from the 15, 
Landry hit running back Skip 
Clary with a pass in the end 
zone. The extra point attempt 
was successful when Landry 
hit Johnny Edens on a pass. 

On their next possession The 
Spirit of '76 successfully 
maneuvered the ball down 
field on short passes and runs. 
The drive was capped off 
when Landry scored on a four 
yard run. The extra point 
attempt was successful as 
Landry and Edens again 
teamed up on a pass. 

The victory raised the Spirit 
of '76's record to three wins 
and one loss and earned them 
the right to meet Couyon 8 in 
the first round of the play-offs 
Monday Oct. 18. 



ATTENTION FRATERNITIES 
& SORORITIES... 

DESIGN YOUR OWN PADDLES. 

SEE OUR SELECTION OF WOODEN 
LETTERS, PADDLE FORMS, 
CRESTS, ETC. 



WOODEN 

OT BACKGROUND* 

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114C HWY. 1 SOUTH 



PHONE 352-8940 




CAN'T WE DO THE SAME?— After the CURRENT SAUCE, bicentennial 

the three time capsules were found tokens and any other fitting objects, 

on campus it was suggested that the a time capsule found 20 to 30 years 

same metal box be placed back in its from now would be a revelation to 

original niche. It was suggested that the finders of NSU in 1976. 
in the box there be placed a copy of 




RIDE'EM COWBOY— This young 
man demonstrates the fine talent of 




WOOEW THERE— This person seems to have the 
goat well in hand as the partner awaits the best 
chance to slip the sack over the goat in Thursday 
night's goat sacking competition. 



handling a bucking horse in true 
Western style. 



Officers 
elected 

Pi Omega Pi recently 
elected its new officers for the 
Fall, 1976 semester. 

The officers are presently 
working on a list of students 
who will be selected to receive 
invitations inviting them to 
become members of Pi 
Omega Pi this semester. Since 
only a selected few are in- 
vited, it is quite an honor to 
receive an invitation. 

Officers and sponsors for 
the Fall 1976 Semester are: 
Marilyn Richmond, president 
Elliette Borrero, vice- 
president; Juanita Bogan, 
secretary-historian; Danny 
Ross, treasurer; Glenda 
LaCaze, publicity chairman; 
and sponsors Sarah Williams 
and Judy Boone. 



Congratulations, 
you're in medtcal school. 




Now, you have to 
pay for it. 



That can be a very serious problem today, especially with 
tuition costs climbing relentlessly Yes. you can borrow, but by 
the time you enter practice those debts can be substantial 

There is an alternative— an Armed Forces Health Profes 
sions (AFHP) scholarship. Whether you're studying to be a 
physician or a dentist, whether your goal is to become an 
osteopath or an optometrist, it can pay your entire tuition and 
fees all through medical school It will also provide you with a 
substantial monthly allowance In other words, if you qualify, 
one of those scholarships can give you financial independence 
now, when you need it most. 

When you're ready to go into practice, an AFHP scholar 
ship will also have paved the way for you to start your career 
under highly favorable circumstances. You'll be a commissioned 
officer in the military branch of your selection. Your practice 
will be waiting for you. You'll step into it and know that the 
challenges you'll meet will be solely medical ones and profes 
sionally stimulating. 

There will also be opportunity for further study The 
Armed Forces have created extensive and outstanding clinical, 
teaching and research programs. Once you decide on a spe- 
cialty, you may find yourself taking the graduate medical studies 
of your choice at one of their facilities 

The details are many. But if you'll send in the coupon. 



we'll mail you literature which will give you a good overview of 
the scope of our operations Why not write? We think you'll 
be interested in the possibilities. 



I Armed 1 

PO Bo» AF. Peoria. IL 61614 



ZCN106 



luTI 



Yes. I am interested in Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship 
opportunities I understand there is no obligation 
I am especially interested in 

□ Army □ Air Force □ Navy 

□ veterinary" □ Psychology (PhD)" □ Physician □ Dental 
D Optometry 



Name- 



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(School) 




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(month, year) 



'Uetertnary not available i 
Progra 



Navy Program. Psychology no( available m Army 



Armed Forces Health Care. 

Dedicated to health care and 
the people who practice it. 



Page 4 CURRENT SAUCE October 12, 1976 





do m. umt to mi m me on 



E 



Not willi 
•4 defeat 
Hrkansas 
,go, th 
pemons s 
fom Nich 
,ere truly 
pemons 
^fending 
ftiibodam 
The De 
tontrol £ 
both then 
passing gi 
K mix up 
Speakin 
pemon i 
lOcholls 
nly 69 ya 



STATE FAIR COURT NOMINEES— It is quite an 
honor to be elected to the State Fair Court. Lolo 
Camors, Lissa Parsons, and Jane Thompson are 
three of the 19 girls running in Wednesday's 

contest. 

What do you think? 



New stickers have been 
distributed to all the buildings 
en campus to be placed on 
fight switch plates urging 
Users to "Help Put Me Out!" 

Certainly an effort is being 
made (though the effect- 
iveness is in question) to 
conserve electricity, even 
though the design of the 
stickers is a definite success in 
promoting ugliness and poor 
design. 

Several years ago small 
black and white stickers were 
placed on light switches 
throughout the campus. These 
stickers were simply block 
printed with a black border 
using only one color ink 
.black) on a white 
background. Now in a new 
Conservation push we have 
been supplied with two color 
printing (red and green) on a 
white background. The 



process of two color printing 
requires too press runs in 
order to place the two colors 
on the paper, so more energy 
was used in these two press 
runs than in the old black and 
white stickers. 

Perhaps the designer of 
these new stickers could 
explain the necessity of the 
two color printing unless we 
are after a year round 
Christmas touch on every 
light plate . Also, the design 
itself lacks clarity and pur- 
pose. 

It takes some study and 
thought to grasp the concept 
behind George Washington 
saying HELP PUT ME OUT! 
Perhaps our designer could 
have been more original and 
put a sketch of former Gov. 
John McKeithen with a 
caption saying, "WON'T YOU 
HEP ME?" 




STATE FAIR COURT NOMINEES— State Fair 
Court election is being held Wednesday in the 
Student Union on the second floor from 8 a. m. to 7 
p. m. Donna King, Tina Devillier, and Debbie 
Page are campus coeds on the ballot. 



SUGB holds LOB 




NORTHWESTERN SPECIAL j: 

KB™' 5 10% OFF OK MY ITEM 



i 

) 
1 
J 

) ■ 

J in our Athletic Department. Good for such items as Adidas 
j Nike and Converse Shoes; Softball and Football Jerseys; Jog 
* ging 'and Warm-up Suits; Tennis Rackets, and Levi Blue Jeans 



: ging and Warm-up fcims; lennis nwawu, **— i . | 



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e Why cut it short? 



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Cancer Society i 



Writing, speaking hints given 



E. B. White has said 
"Writing is an act of faith." 
Undoubtedly he means that to 
express yourself well you 
must have faith in yourself, 
and in your thoughts and in 
your ability to express them. 
The key is to be confident and 
competent enough to convey 
those thoughts to the reader. 

Admittedly, that is easier 
said than done. Writing, like 
any skill worth mastering, 
takes practice and work. But 
the process of improving your 
writing can be fun and 
challenging, and the benefits 
well worth the effort. After all, 



Lady of the Bracelet 
pageant activities are 
proceeding smoothly and the 
list of preliminary contestants 
is now complete with the 
names of thirty-two girls. 

Preliminary judging will 
occur on Oct. 30 with four 
judges. They include Mrs. 
Mary Ann Robinson, Mr. Skip 
Russell, Mrs. Marilyn Stevens 
and Mr. Jake Ussery. 

Participating in 
preliminary events will be 
Sherry Anderson, Dolly Ar- 
nold, Marylyn Bartek, Layne 
Benson, Cindy Black, Lee Ann 
Blaufuss, Kay Bolinger and 
Dianne Carter. 

Other girls included in 
preliminaries will be Pitty 
Cathey, Alike Cole, Edna 
Davis, Vanessa Davis, 
Stephanie Davitt, Linda 
Denise Dees, Lisa Delery and 
Denise Gueriuger. 

Also involved are Edith 
Harris, Ronda Henson, 
Marion Holcomb, Helen 
Hubley, Deanie Lanclos, 
Debra McHaffey, Linda 
McKnight and Peggy Jo 
Middleton. 

Completing the list of 
preliminary contenders are 
Charlene Miller, Nell Reed, 
Debra Scott, Jaree Sherrer, 
Marria Strahan, Donna 
Vaughn, Lynn Waller and 
Karen Weeks. 

There's 
lots of living 

and 
loving ahead 



in tests or exams you should 
be able to write clearly about 
what you have learned. Or, 
when your friends are away, 
you should be able to write 
them interesting letters. And 
later, when you are working, 
the ability to express yourself 
will be invaluable-in a letter to 
a prospective employer, for 
example, or in office 
correspondence, business 
reports, or sales proposals. 

This article from the 
Association of American 
Publishers is an overview of 
the techniques of writing. It 
reviews the main elements of 





STATE FAIR COURT NOMINEES— Nine girls 
are elected to serve on the court with one girl 
being crowned the queen. Cammie Hargis, Vivian 
Billeaudeau, and Mikki Wells are vying for a 
chance to serve as a member of the court. 



BIG SPECIAL SALE 

YOU CAN GET FROM 
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TOP QUALITY 
MERCHANDISE 
THROUGHOUT 
THE STORE! 

SANDEFUR 
JEWELERS 

624 FRONT STREET PHONE 352-6390 





grammar and the principles of 
good composition-the 
framework upon which you 
build your skills. 

1. Choose words carefully 

2. Punctuate, capitalize, and 
spell correctly 

3. Construct sentences and 
paragraphs clearly 

4. Appraise and outline each 
assignment 

5. Write, review, and revise 
"To understand others and 

be understood by all , know the 
big words but use the 
small." Anonymous 



Through practice you will 
learn how to use words accur 
ately and effectively. You win 
know, for instance, to reply on 
concrete nouns and on strong, 
active verbs for impact. Yon 
will use passive verbs less 
frequently since they can lack 
strength and character. You 
will come to understand that if 
you are precise in your choice 
of nouns and verbs, you will 
have no need to add qualifying 
adverbs or adjectives to make 
youself understood. 




Have you ever thought of 
yourself as a wordworker? 
Actually we all are. It is 
through words that we express 
our thoughts or emotions. 
Without words we would be 
unable to record, preserve, 
explain, or enjoy the learning 
of the ages. Man's unique 
ability to communicate ef- 
fectively depends upon a 
familiarity and facility with 
words. 

Imagine carpenters, whose 
livelihood depends upon the 
ability to work with wood. 
Before they can build 
anything they must learn how 
to handle the raw material of 
their trade . First, they study 
the different kinds of wood: 
their uses, their textures, and 
their weaknesses and 
strengths. Through practice 
they learn to cut, shape, and 
smooth their work so that it 
serves the purpose for which it 
is intended. 

So it is with words, the raw 
material of language. First, 
we must recognize the eight 
types , or parts of speech: 
nouns, pronouns, adjectives, 
verbs, adverbs, prepositions, 
conjunctions, and in- 
terjections. The more familiar 
we become with each of these- 
the easier it is to use them 
correctly. 



A competent writer is one 
who uses qualifying words or 
phrases sparingly. Sentences 
built with strength and 
precision require no patching 
or additional support. More 
forceful writing uses the 
positive rather than negative. 
It is also better to avoid 
colloquial, foreign, or slang 
expressions because they can 
interrrupt the smooth flow of 
English. 



[SU vs KI 
TUL vs A 
NLU vs L 
SLU vs L 
PCH vs T 
MCNEES1 
LA. TECI 
JJSL vs F 
ERAM. v: 
!AMA vs ' 
BALT. vs 
BNCI vs 
DALLAS i 
10. vs & 
SEATTLE 



One of the best ways 
improve your facility with , 
words is to keep a dictionary f l^n 
nearby. You will find in it not LJxi 
only definitions and spelling, j 
but derivations, synonym*, the Nort 
pronunciation, and word iversity t 
usage . If you acquire the habit lies it's 
of looking up new words, yon 
will expand your vocabulary 
and will better understand the 
subtleties of meaning. Ac- 
curacy in the use of words is a 
very important aspect of • 
writer's skill. 



If you look again at some of 
the good books you have read 
you will probably notice that 
the words used are exact is 
their meaning and that the 
language carries you forward 
without interruption. Long 
descriptions can be boring' 
Clear and concise writing 
makes for more interesting 
reading. When you write, keep 
your readers in mind. 



\ 




Mk 




W 



STATE FAIR COURT NOM I NEES— The que?, ' 
and her court will participate in the activities ^ ' 

SS k ° C \- 23 and rei § n over game th*! 
night Cheryl Purcell, Cindy Etheridge, * 

St! Tut had their 0311168 placed 



oflk 



n 



barterba 
* the 1 
'rthwe 
Wsity's 
his i 
""ance in 
*nsas S 

Alght, wt 
'**sfor 3C 
*ndowns 
I within: 
time pi 
>for a 
/has 554 
\ Jettons 
, ^ in f oi 
**ing an 
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J*Wante 

V ii 

^OVEC 
f| »anentl 
. 'Prolog 
^on, loi 
IV>n e 3S 

ijllpient o 



October 12. 1976 CURRENT SAUCE Page 5 



2-f 

OF 

, 




Demons defeat "other" NSU 20 -8 



Not willing to die after a 44- 
;4 defeat at the hands of 
Arkansas State two weekends 
( go, the Northwestern 
Demons showed the Colonels 
jrom Nicholls State that they 
#ere truly alive and well. The 
pemons rolled past the 
defending GSC champs from 
fliibodaux, 20-8. 
The Demons used a ball 
control attack, employing 
both the running game and the 
passing game interchanging! y 
to mix up the Colonel defense. 
Speaking of defense, the 
Demon defense held the 
[ficholls running attack to 
only 69 yards in 39 carries and 



allowed 150 yards through the 
air. 

This was the Demons first 
victory ever over the Colonels 
since they have met for the 
first time in 1973. In 1973, the 
Colonels won a close 3-0 
decision over the Demons. The 
Colonels managed to win the 
1974 encounter 7-0, and in '75 
defeated the Demons 23-10 
while on their way to the GSC 
championship. 

Sidney "Thundering Bull" 
Thornton returned to action 
after sitting out a week with a 
knee injury adding 68 yards on 
17 carries to the Demon attack 
and accounted for the first 



Demon touchdown of the 
evening. Freshman standout 
Mark Schroeder also scored a 
TD for the Demons late in the 
fourth quarter that put the 
game out of reach of the 
Colonels. 

Schroeder finished the 
evening with 61 yards on 13 
carries, while Frank Haring 
carried 15 time for 44 yards. 

Dennis Pendergraft 
provided the rest of the 
scoring for the Demons, 
converting on the 2 PATs and 
kicking field goals of the 30 
and 40 yards. 

Coach A. L. Williams said 
after the game that "I was 



disappointed with our con- 
tinuation to make foolish 
mistakes in very key places in 
the game. We have a lot of 
things to iron out before we 
meet Tech." The Demons will 
meet arch-rival La. Tech in 
their next game, Oct. 23 in the 
State Fair Stadium in 
Shreveport. 

The Demons got the 
scoreboard first as Dennis 
Pendergraft kicked his first 
field goal of the game. The 
Demons drove from their own 
nine yard line to the Nicholls 
13 when the drive stalled. 
Pendergraft's 30 yarder made 
the score 3-0, Demons. 



Two possession later the 
Demons pushed the ball into 
the endzone with Thronton 
doing the honors. The Demons 
drive that set up this score 
was aided by excellent runs of 
Thornton and Schroeder that 
gave the Demons crucial first 
downs. 

Pendergraft came in with 
seconds showing on the clock 
at the end of the first half to 
boot a 45-yard field goal at- 
tempt. His effort was wide to 
the left, but Nicholls was off- 
sides on the play. With one 
second left, Pendergraft's 40 
yard try was good giving the 
Demons a 13-0 lead at the 



Pigskin Predictions 



ven 



actice you will 
se words accur- 
;tively. You will 
nee, to reply on 
s and on strong, 
or impact. You 
jive verbs less 
:e they can lack 
character. You 
iderstand that if 
e in your choice 
verbs, you will 
o add qualifying 
jectives to make 
stood. 

; writer is one 
ifying words or 
igly. Sentences 
strength and 
ire no patching 
support. More 
;ing uses the 
■ than negative, 
etter to avoid 
eign, or slang 
■cause they can 
smooth flow of 




Last week's winner was 
Mike Rabalais, our Current 
Sauce staff photographer. 
Mike was 11-15 for 73 percent, 
while Chris Fereuson and 



myself tied with a 10-15 mark. 
Ryder brought up the rear, 
going 9-15 for the week. 

This week's guest panelists 
are Jim Adkins, Director of 



the Student Union Games 
Room, and John Russell, 
President of Kappa Sigma 
fraternity at NSU. 




>7? 

™ in 


BOSSIER 


IfiU vs KEN 


LSU 27-17 


TUL vs ARMY 


TUL 17-13 


NLU vs LOUIS 


LOUIS. 17-10 


SLU vs LIVINSTON 


SLU 28-20 


MCH vs TENN-MARTIN 


NICH 14-13 


J1CNEESE vs UT-A 


MCNEESE 35-20 


LA. TECH vs LAMAR 


TECH 21-17 


USL vs FURMAN 


USL 28-7 


GRAM, vs MISS. VALLEY 


GRAM 38-6 


JAMA vs TENN. 


BAMA 38-31 


BALT. vs BUFFALO 


BALT. 27-14 


UNCI vs PITTS. 


CINCI 28-25 


DALLAS vs St. LOUIS 


DALLAS 31-21 


H.O. vs SAN FRAN. 


S.F. 14-10 


SEATTLE vs TAMPA BAV 


SEATTLE 17-7 





RYDER 



LSU 21-10 
TUL 14-7 
NLU 14-13 
SLU 24-7 
NICH 13-10 
MCNEESE 16-7 
TECH 27-14 
USL 20-13 
GRAM 31-21 
BAMA 17-14 
BALT. 24-17 
PITTS. 14-13 
DALLAS 24-10 
S.F. 13-10 
TAMPA BAY 7-3 



RUSSELL 



LSU 21-14 
TUL 14-10 
LOUIS. 17-14 
SLU 21-14 

TENN-MARTIN 14-7 
MCNEESE 28-10 
TECH 34-7 
USL 24-0 
GRAM 24-14 
BAMA 17-10 
BALT. 31-17 
PITTS. 24-17 
DALLAS 35-28 
S.F. 14-10 
SEATTLE 24-10 



ADKINS 



LSU 34-14 
TUL 27-14 
NLU 24-17 
LIVING 18-7 
NICH 21-10 
MCNEESE 44-0 
TECH 40-0 
USL 36-16 
GRAM 50-0 
BAMA 35-24 
BALT. 37-24 
PITTS. 27-9 
DALLAS 30-17 
N.O. 30-14 
SEATTLE 21-7 



best ways 

• facility with 
;ep a dictionary 
rill find in it not 
ns and spelling! 
ms, synonym, the Northwestern State 
n, and word hrersity tennis team con- 
acquire the habit nes it's winning ways, 
new words, yon ^ 
four vocabulary 

• understand the 
meaning. Ac- 
use of words is * 
nt aspect of a 



again at some of 
s you have read 
•ably notice that 
ed are exact ft\ 
I and that theji 
ries you forward I 
•ruption. Long R 
can be boring. 'M 
concise writwp 
lore interesting *» 
l you write, ke«? 
In mind. 



Demon netters continue impressive victories 




Vright makes biggest jump in NSU statistics 



I— The que«J 
ictivities h el ( 
le game th a , 
leridge, a 
ies placed 



compiling impressive vic- 
tories over the teams from 
McNeese and Northeast 

MANNING AND 
VARELA...Both of 
these two Demon net- 
ters have been playing 
exceptional tennis, 
along with the rest of 
the Demon tennis squad. 
Manning teamed with 
Ricardo Acuna to defeat 
Gustavo Rivera and 
Arthur Heygate of 
McNeese 6-4, 6-3 in No. 1 
doubles competitioa 
Against Northeast, 
Manning defeated Bruce 
Erhardt 6-3 and 7-6. Luis 
Varola, inaction against 
McNeese, stopped 
Heygate 4-6, 6-2, and 6-1. 
In the match against 
Northeast, Varela 
stopped Bill Siegel 6-4, 
6-2. The Demon tennis 
team is performing like 
the squad that compiled 
a 24-1 dual match record 
last year. 



Louisiana University. 

The Demon netters, who 
compiled a 24-1 dual match 





record in the spring of this 
year, picked up where they 
left off in the shutout victory 
win over the Cowboys in their 
opening match of the season. 

Ricardo Acuna of Santiago, 
Chile, playing in the No.l 
position, defeated Gustavo 
Rivera 6-3, 6-4 and teamed 
with Gregg Manning to defeat 
Rivera and Arthur Heygate 6- 
4, 6-3 in the No. 1 doubles 
match. 

Jose DeCamino, returning 
to the NSU team after a year 
of tournament competition, 
downed Reddy Gustine 6-2, 6- 
2; Luis Varela stopped 
Heygate 4-6, 6-2, 6-1; Juan 
Lopez beat Paul Shepherd 6-4, 
6-3 and Steve Fricker defeated 
Hugh Fisher 7-5, 7-5 in other 
singles matches. 

DeCamino teamed with 
Varela for a 7-6, 6-0 win in No.2 
doubles over Gustine and 
Ventura, and Lopez and 
Fricker downed Fischer and 
Shepherd 6-2, 4-6, 6-1 in the 
No. 3 doubles. 



In action against NLU, 
Acuna easily won his No.l 
singles match 6-2, 6-1 over 
NLU's Raymond Pascale. 
Other singles winners in- 
cluded Gregg Manning 6-3, 7-6 
over Bruce Erhardt, Jose 
DeCamino over David Hall 6- 
4, 6-2, Luis Varela 6-4, 6-2 over 
Bill Siegel, and Juan Lopez 
over Tim Burnham, 6-3, 6-1. 

Pascale and Erhardt 
teamed for a 6-3, 3-6, 7-6 win 
over Acuna and Manning in 
the No.l doubles match, 
giving NLU their only win. 
Lopez and Steve Fricker 
downed Hall and Burnham 4-6, 
7-6, 6-4 in the other doubles 
match. 




Wterback Stuart Wright 
the biggest jump in 
lr thwestern State 
bersity's football statistics 
* his near-record per- 
*>ance in the 44-24 loss to 
Was State University. 

'fght, who hit on 16 of 35 
for 307 yards and three 
^downs in the game, 
■ ^Within 24 yards of NSU's 
time passing yardage 
"tl for a single game. He 
'has 554 yards on 34 of 84 
'Metions and four touch- 
es in four games so far, 
^ing an average of 136 



a game. 



Waymond Waters, 
sophomore wide receiver 
from Dallas, Texas, held on to 
tills lead in pass receiving 
after his 178 yards on five 
catches and two touchdowns 
against ASU. 

Waters 178 yards 
also moved him into second 
place on the NSU listings for 
total yardage receiving in one 
game. He now has 285 yards 
on 11 catches, Just ahead of 
sophomore Mike Almond's 10 
f»atr>hf>s for 142 yards. 



Sidney Thornton, who did 
not play against ASU because 
of an injured knee, still 
remains the team's rushing 
leader with 261 yards, a 5.9 




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average and five touchdowns 
in only five quarters of play 
this season. He is followed by 
freshman Brett Knecht with 
153 yards and freshman Mark 
Schroeder with 116 yards. 

Willie Mosely and Robert 
Hardwell lead the team in 
punt and kickoff returns 
respectively. Mosely has a 
12.7 average per punt runback 
and Hardwell is averaging 
16.3 yards per kickoff return. 

Dennis Pendergraft sports a 



39.7 average punting on 23 
kicks with a long punt of 52 
yards. He kicked 10 times for 
381 yards against Arkansas 
State, both just short of school 
records. 

NSU still leads its opponents 
in total offense average, 331.8 
to 283.8, and for the first time 
this season the Demons are 
passing for more yardage 
than rushing. NSU is 
averaging 172.3 yards per 
game in the air and 159.5 
yards on the ground. 



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intermission. 

Defense was very strong for 
the Demons. In the first half, 
the Colonels only managed 57 
rushing and 47 yards in the 
air. Donnie Pistorious made 
excellent plays, while Bobby 
Kirchoff, Jerry Edwards and 
Roscoe Lewis constantly 
caused problems for the 
Nicholls offense. 

The third quarter saw both 
teams tighten up on defense. 
Both punters, Dan Brown of 
Nicholls and Pendergraft, got 
workouts during this quarter. 
Brown, a product of Robert E. 
Lee High in Baton Rouge, 
punted 7 times for the Colonels 
for a 38.9 yard average. His 
long punt of the evening was a 
59 yard boomer that was 
returned 30 yards by Willie 
Mosely. Pendergraft punted 5 
times for a 37.6 average, his 
long one being a 42 yard boot. 

Nicholls scored their first 
points on the kicking team 
when a high snap from center 
forced Perdergraft out of the 
endzone for a safety, making 
the score 13-2, Demons. 

Using the pass to perfection, 
quarterback Tedd Bergeron 
connected with big tight end 
Gerald Butler for key yardage 
in the Nicholls touchdown 
drive late in the fourth 
quarter. A 16 yard pass from 
Bergeron to tailback Mike 
Shilling gave the Colonels 
their lone TD with a little over 
two minutes left in the contest. 



The Colonels attempt for two 
points was stopped short on a 
fine tackle by U. L. Finister. 

The Demons, not willing to 
rest on their slim five point 
lead, took the kickoff and 
marched in for a score. Fresh- 
man running back Brett 
Knecht set up the last Demon 
score with a 47 yard run off 
left tackle that went to the 
Nicholls 7. Three plays later, 
Schroeder went the final two 
yards for his TD of the 
evening. The PAT made the 
score NSU 20, Nicholls 8. 

Nicholls head coach Bill 
Clements said afterwards of 
the Demon effort: "We were 
impressed with their depth. 
Even with Thornton out, it 



didn't hurt them. We knew 
they were going to be good 
when we came here and they 
didn't surprise us one bit." 

Hopefully, the Demons can 
surprise a team by the name 
of the LA. Tech Bulldogs on 
October 23. The last time the 
Demons defeated the Bulldogs 
was in 1970 by the score of 20- 
12. in recent years, the 
Bulldogs have embarrassed 
the Demons by scores of 26-7 
in 1973, 34-0 in 1974, and 41-14 
last year. 

Tech has a dismal record of 
1-4, losing to University of 
Texas at Arlington 56-35 this 
week. NSU has a 3-2 record, 
losing to only Lamar and 
Arkansas State. 



Football progresses 



by Bob Rash 

The flag football com- 
petition is going strong as the 
action goes through another 
week. 

On Thursday, the 29, 
Steelers beat PEK 34-18 while 
Couyone 8 won by forfeit over 
Varnado. The Spirit of '76 
whipped the Rapides Raiders 
39-12 and the Rapides 
Roughnecks eased BSU 12-6. 

Monday saw Pi Kappa Phi 
get passed Sigma Tau Gamma 
12-6, Kappa Alpha swamped 
TKE 31-0, Kappa Sigma beat 
Cossau Bandits by forfeit, and 
in girls action, Sigma Kappa 



won over the Hot Dogs 6-0. 

In Tuesday's action, the 
ROTC Rangers forfeited to 
PEK, The Steelers also won by 
forfeit over Rapides Raiders, 
with BSU blowing past Var- 
nado 20-13, and Couyon 8 
blasting the Bows 29-6. 

The tug-of-war saw the 
Kappa Sigma Fraternity win 
the mens division and the Hot 
Dogs win the womens division. 
Kappa Alpha was second and 
PEK tied with Spirit of '76 for 
third. Sigma Kappa captured 
Second with Sigma Sigma 
Sigma taking third in the 
women's competition. 



Lady Demons are blazing 



the Northwestern State 
University Lady Demon 
volleyball team is off to a 
blazing start, having compiled 
a 5-1 match record against 
such opposition as Northeast 
Louisiana university, 
Louisiana Tech, Southwestern 
Louisiana, and Nicholls State. 

The Lady Demons, who 
compiled a 22-9 match record 
in 1975, defeated La. Tech and 
Northeast in a round robin 
meet played last week on the 
NSU campus. Tech fell to the 
Lady Demons 15-9 and 15-7, 
while Northeast was defeated 



15-10 and 15-0. 

The Lady Demons could 
only manage a third place 
showing in the Nicholls State 
Tournament October 2 in 
Thibodaux. The Lady Demons 
easily won their half of the 
round robin tourney by 
defeating Northeast, La. 
Tech, and USL, before losing 
to host Nicholls State in the 
sernin finals of the elimination 
bracket. 

With six matches com- 
pleted, the NSU Lady Demons 
have outscored their op- 



ponents 186 to 118. Their game 
total through six matches is 
10-3, losing once to USL and 
twice to Nicholls. 



Individual leaders for the 
Lady Demons are freshman 
Mary Sonnier with 47 points, 
sophomore Jill Hyatt with 42 
points, Pam Moore, who had 
31 spikes for winners in the 
Nicholls meet, has 25 points, 
and freshman Sheila Credeur 
has 17 points. 




NSU STUDENT 
ORGANIZATIONS! 



Have you made arrangements for your group's picture 
to be taken for the 1977 POTPOURRI? 

If not, you should talk with Jo Ford, yearbook 
Organizations Editor, IMMEDIATELY. Her printer 
deadline is fast approaching. 

See her — Call her — POTPOURRI Office, R. 225, A&S 
Bldg. — Tel. 357-5026. Her office hours: Tuesday, 11-12; 
Wed. & Fri., 11-1; and Thursday, 9-10. 



Faculty honor created 



The College of Education at and the three Natchitoches 
NSU has established a banks to provide a cash award 



Distinquished Faculty Chair 
to give outstanding educators 
at the university professional 
recognition and financial 
award for excellence in 
teaching. 

Dr. Robert A. Most, dean of 
the College of Education, said 
a recipient for the 1976-77 
school year will be named this 
fall. The educator selected 
will receive a plaque and a 
$500 cash award. 

"We are attempting to 
recognize the person who had 
demonstrated excellence in 
everything we do," Alost said. 
"It is our purpose to make 
teaching better by providing 
incentives for excellence." 

The College of Education 
has received financial con- 
tributions from student groups 
at NSU, local civic and 
professional organizations 



for the recipient of the honor. 

Nine educators in the 
College of Education have 
been recommended by their 
NSU associated students at 
the university for selection as 
the first recipient of the 
faculty chair award. 

Nominated for this year's 
award were Dr. Mildred Hart 
Bailey, acting head of the 
Department of Elementary 
Education; Dr. Allen Bon- 
nette, professor of health and 
physical education; Dr. 
Thomas Clinton, professor of 
education; Mrs. Mary Lee 
Posey, assocate professor of 
elementary education; Dr. 
Robert Breackenridge, 
associate professor of 
psychology; Dr. Ceclia 
Decker, associate professor of 
home economics; Dr. Hurst 
Hall, professor of educational 
psychology; Dr. Colleen 



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Monk, professor of health and 
physical education; and Miss 
Betty Virginia Johnson, 
professor of home economics. 

The educators were 
nominated for the award by 
students organizations and 
departments in the College of 
Education. 

Currently evaluating the 
recommendations for the first 
award is a committee which is 
comprised of faculty and staff 
members and two students 
from each department in the 
College of Education. 

Faculty and staff members 
serving on the selection 
committee include Phi Kappa 
Phi president Dr. Roderick H. 
Outland, professor of 
biological sciences; Faculty 
Senate president Dr. Nadya C. 
Keller, assistant professor of 
microbiology and 
biochemistry; Dr. James Ft. 
Bartholomew, chairman of 
the Department of 
Languages; Mrs. Hazel H. 
Batiste, counselor, and Dr. 
Auston Temple, Associate 
professor of mathematics. 

Officers listed 

On September 24, 1976 NCAS 
held its' first meeting in the 
Business Building on the NSU 
campus. Officers for the 1976- 
77 year are Karen Mayers, 
president; Terri Bordelon, 
vice-president; Debbie 
Patterson, secretary; Jerri 
Fix, treasurer; Cereece 
Smith, historian and Jocyelyn 
Pousson, publicity. 

Initiation of new members 
by Debbie Van Dine also took 
place at the meeting. New 
members are Amy Hyams, 
Shirley Landrum, Ruth Ann 
Martin, Debra Jackson, Alice 
Durr, Debbie Blaisdell, and 
Kathy Prudhomme. 

Fund raising was the main 
topic dicussed at the meeting 
alone with taking pictures for 
the Potpourri. Following the 
meeting, refreshments were 
served by Terri Bordelon. 




STEER A YEAR— Firal Ryder of Natchitoches 
(second from right), president of the Nat- 
chitoches Parish Cattlemen's Associatioa has 
donated the first head of beef to Northwestern 
State University's "Steer A Year" program which 
was established to provide quality beef for con- 
sumption by members of the university's athletic 
teams. Inspecting the beef which will be prepared 
for and consumed by the athletes during their 
respective seasons are (from left) quarterback 
Stuart Wright of Natchitoches, NSU head football 
coach A. L. Williams and quarterback David 
Wright of Natchitoches. 

Artists visit museum 



The NSU Association of 
Student Artists (ASA) took a 
field trip to the Dallas-Fort 
Worth area museums Sept. 29- 
Oct. 1. 

Visiting the Kimball 
Museum, the club saw a 
featured exhibit of paintings 
from the "Fauve" period. 
This exhibit included works of 
Matisse, Derain, and 
Vlaminck. Also visited were 
the Amon Carter Museum and 
the Dallas Museum of Fine 
Arts. 

The ASA has numerous 
activities planned for the 
semester. Among them are a 
camping trip to Arkansas with 
a follow-up exhibit of work 
done on the trip. 



A Christmas sale is to be 
held in the Student Union 
Lobby December 2-3. 

Members of the Dallas-Fort 
Worth trip were John Haag, 
Charles Coke, Rivers Murphy, 
Billy Bryant, Mark Davison, 
Harry Hillier, James Pickett, 
Adrienne Bordelon, Cheryl 
Purcell, Fair Hyams, Nancy 
McClellan, Ralph Cooper, 
Michael Thellen, Lugene 
Strange, Marie Hebert, Mary 
Hall, Pam Locke, Ken Tracey, 
Jennifer Caldwell, and Irene 
and Bill Fornshell. 

Anyone who is interested in 
joining ASA is welcomed to 
attend next meeting. Mem- 
bership is not limited to art 
majors. 




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Page 6 CURRENT SAUCE October 12, 



Three Columns 



Steinhorst 

scholarship 

Kim Steinhorst, a senior 
social sciences major, is one 
of 25 Louisiana college 
students selected to study this 
fall at the Louisiana Studies 
Center at Paul Valery 
University in Montpellier, 
France. 

The Louisiana Studies 
Center was established by the 
Consortium of Louisiana 
Colleges and Universities in 
1975 under the sponsorship of 
CODOFIL, the Council for the 
Development of French in 
Louisiana. 

The purpose of the study 
center in France is to provide 
an academic program cen- 
tered around French studies. 
The program is applicable 
toward degree credit at all 
Louisiana colleges and 
universities. The 25 students 
who are participating in the 
program were awarded 
scholarships from CODOFIL. 

Dr. Philip Dur, honor 
professor of political science 
at the University of South- 
western Louisiana is the first 
resident director of the 
program. 



dependent Study Project in 
the student's own field of 
interest. An increasing 
number of American colleges 
and universities are giving full 
or partial credit for the 
Seminar year. 

The fee, covering tuition, 
room, board, one-way group 
transportation from New York 
and all course-connected 
travels in Scandinavia is 
$3,800. A limited number of 
scholarship loans are 
available. 

For further information 
please write to: 

SCANDINAVIAN SEMINAR 
100 East 85th Street 
New York, N.Y. 10028 



Opening available 
in seminar 

Scandinavian Seminar is 
now accepting applications for 
its study abroad program in 
Denmark, Finland, Norway, 
or Sweden for the academic 
year 1977-78. This living-and 
learning experience is 
designed for college students, 
graduates and other adults 
who want to become part of 
another culture while 
acquiring a second language. 

An initial three weeks 
language course, followed by 
a family stay whenever 
possible, will give the student 
an opportunity to practice the 
language on a daily basis and 
to share in the life of the 
community. For the major 
part of the year he is 
spearated from his fellow 
American students, living and 
studying among Scan- 
dinavians at a "People's 
College" (residential school 
for continuing adult 
education) or some other 
specialized institution. 

All Seminar student par- 
ticipate in the Introductory, 
Midyear and Final Sessions, 
where matters related to their 
studies, experiences and in- 
dividual progress are 
reviewed and discussed. The 
focus of the Scandinavian 
Seminar program is an In- 



FFA names 
Area I winner 

Alexandria Senior High 
School won the Area I Future 
Farmers of America forestry 
judging contest conducted last 
week on the NSU campus. 

Ringgold High School 
placed second in the com- 
petition, which was sponsored 
by the Louisiana Association 
of Future Farmers of America 
in cooperation with the 
Louisiana Forestry Commiss- 
ion. 

Third place in the area meet 
went to the judging team from 
Sarepta High School. Placing 
fourth in the contest was 
Stonewall High School. 

The Alexandria Senior High 
School forestry judging team 
will now advance to the tri- 
state comeptition to be held 
this spring in Oklahoma. ASH 
will be one of four area win- 
ners from Louisiana com- 
petiting against teams from 
Oklahoma and Arkansas at 
the tri-state meet. 

Dr. Arthur Allen, associate 
professor of biology, coodin- 
ated the event at NSU. Contest 
divisions included pacing, 
timber stand improvement, 
identification of trees native to 
this area of the state, deter- 
mination of board feet in 
sawlogs and evaluation of 
pulpwood production in a 
given area. 

Leighman Martin, area 
supervisor for the vocational 
agribusiness and food 
preservation laboratory 
sections of the State Depart- 
ment of Education , supervised 
the contest at NSU. 



Home Ec club 
holds meeting 

Simple to make, nice to 
give, fun to look at, but ex- 
pensive to buy. Making coke 
bottle dolls was demonstrated 
by Jackie Phillips, HomeEc 
club president. The dolls are 
priced at approximately $8 a 
piece, but Jackie showed how 



When you think 
of mens wear.... 
think of 



Capuan's 



to make them for less than t 
Following the dem, 
stration, Jackie called 
NSU Home Economics 
meeting to order. Repoj, 
from Nancy Chaurnoot 
secretary and Cindy Bla^ 
treasurer, were given, r, 
Reed, reporter, gave a brj 
talk on the LHEA p, 
workshop held in Alexanrjrj 
on September 17-18. 

♦ ♦♦♦ 

Valuable fabric 
donated to NSU 



A piece of gold broeaci 
woven with a silver Georgj s 
cross and used in the privat 
chapels of the Romanoffs a 
altar covers and priests' robe 
has been donated to NSU u 
Gordon C. Peters. 

The fabric, which dates 
back to 1850, is one of seven 
articles of antiquity whid 
Peters, a farmer, presented to 
the University for inclusion i 
the permanent collections o 
the Cammie G. Henry 
Louisiana Room of Watson 
Memorial Library at NSU. 

The piece of gold broeaoj 
donated to Northwestern i 
from a collection of brocade 
assembled from the variov 
Imperial Palaces throughoi 
St. Petersburg and stored j 
the ware rooms of the Wintc 
palace in Russia. 

According to John M. Price 
head of special collection i 
NSU , soldiers of the preset 
government were instructs 
to tear out the linings and rip 
off the galoons in preparatio 
for burning the brocades in 
order to reclaim the precioui 
metals of gold and silver with 
which they were woven. 

Price added that many o 
the gold and silver brocade 
were saved from such ruthlea 
destruction by Dr. Armani! 
Hammer. 

The fabric which NSl 
received was purchased by 
Peters' grandmother, Mrs.W 
F. Cummings, from the 
Hammer Collection at Mm 
shall Field & Company « 
Chicago in 1933. Mrs. Cufl> 
mings gave it to her daughtfl 
Phyllis Cummings Peters, 
that same year. Mrs. Petei 
later presented it to Gordoi 
who is her son. 

Peters also presented 
NSU editions of Winn Part 
newspapers which wen 
printed in the early 1900's h 
are no longer being published 
Editions of the Dodson Tirol 
and Winnfield Times »i 
considered to be of extrefli 
historical value for local an 
regional research. 

Northwestern also receW 
copies of the New York Tim* 
edition of Lindbergh's tranJ 
Atlantic flight in 1927 « 
Shreveport Times' edition < 
the end of World War I, wlu' 
is dated Nov. 12, 1918. 

Considered to be 
historical value is the # 
edition of the Winn Part 
director, which is extreme! 
valuable because it surve: 
the entire parish. 

"Donations such as ttal* 
Price said, "help N« 
thwestem's special collect! 01 
grow in importance *' 



Located next to Broadmoor Shopping Center 






WRECK TECH ! 




Page 2 CURRENT SAUCE October 19, 1976 



Showdown set for Saturday night 



by Muffett Richardson 

This Saturday night the NSU 
Demons will meet the La. 
Tech Bulldogs for their 62nd 
battle, an annual classic at the 
State Fair Stadium in 
Shreveport. This year the 
Demons are accompanied by 
a 3-2 record, while the 
Bulldogs will come into the 
contest with only two wins, 
three losses. 

The NSU Demons have 
received only a few bruses and 
a large amount of experience 
that they plan to use to their 



greatest advantage. They 
have been in strict training for 
a good season and football 
critics have agreed that the 
preparation and dedication 
will pay off in this game. 

It is sad to announce that the 
Bulldogs are due for a long 
stay at a local animal hospital 
in Ruston, and they are not 
looking at all well for the 
upcoming game. Not only are 
they in desperate need of 
facial repairs, but it's been 
reported that they are due for 
a worming. It was recom- 



mended by their doctor that 
they just stay in their dogpen 
this weekend, but the Dogs are 
known for never following 
good advise. 

The Demons also have an 
advantage as far as attitude is 
concerned. After last year's 
disappointing loss to the old 
Dogs, they return in search of 
revenge with a mean bunch of 
bloodletters, also known as the 
NSU football team. 

Through a reliable source in 
the campus police department 
it has been learned that Head 




Coach A. L. Williams was 
warned to "be a little easier on 
the opposing teams before the 
Demons are placed in custody 
for being a lethal weapon." 

Actually, this week should 
be circled in red on calendars 
in northwest Louisiana; at the 
very least it should be 
declared a state holiday. This 
is State Fair Week, better 
named at Northwestern State 
University as Wreck Tech 
Week. 

Parades and pep rallies pop 
up throughout the event-filled 
week. Emotions of love and 
admiration for the Bulldogs of 
Tech felt by NSU students are 
expressed on posters across 
campus reading "Go to Hell 
Tech," "Give 'em Hell 
Demons," and of course, 
"Wreck Tech." The annual 
burning of the bulldog and the 
Wreck Tech Dance unites 
Bulldog detesters in a spirit of 
Demon devotion. 



What do the Demons and 
Bulldogs fight about? In 1976 
it's a matter of pride. This is 
no trivial football game. This 
is a serious meeting of two 
VERY opposing schools, with 
the dominating school leaving 
the stadium tonight with a 
number advantage on the 
scoreboard. 

The original purpose for the 
feud is as unknown as the rea- 
son for the Hatfield-McCoy 
squabble. The important idea 
behind this weekend's con- 
frontation is that the Demons 
are getting another shot at 
their opponent, with more 
power on the NSU side than it 
had the previous year. 

After meeting the Demons 
for 61 years it is understan- 
dable that the Bulldogs are 
ready for retirement. Let's 
hope that they can live long 
enough to see the scoreboard 
at the end of the game when 
the Demons walk away with a 
definite dogfight victory. 



HEY TECH! — The cheerleaders 
are telling it like it is in this sign. The 
cheerleaders for the NSU-Tech 
game are (counter clockwise) 
Evelyn Ashley, Cheryl Babcock, 



Stan Haynes, Marylyn Bartek, 
Bonnie Outlaw, Rhonda Hereon, 
Mike Dykes, Fonda Hereon, and 
Kathy Kelly. Not pictured is Jamie 
Sanders. 



i 

* 
* 

* 

* 

* 
* 
* 

* 

* 
* 

* 
* 

* 

* 

* 

* 
* 



Pigskin 

Prediction 



Since this is not an ordinary 
weekend for Demon Football, 
I decided that this must be 
some sort of special football 
panel. 

Instead of having the usual 
15 games, this week's panel is 



focused only on the NSU- 
TECH game. Members of the 
administration at NSU and 
local people who deal with 
sports were asked to give their 
best predictions on the out- 
come. Here they are: 






g 



Bill Bossier.. .This is the 
year. The Demons have the 
upper hand for a change, but 
they must stop the potent Tech 
passing game. The Demon 
offense must also be con- 
sistent. NSU 42. LTU 21 



* 
* 

* 
* 

* 

* 
if 
* 
* 

* 

* Bob Rush, Student trainer, 

* NSU athletics. ..The defense 

* has the ability to come up with 
J the big plays. Also, the overall 
*• attitude of the Demon squad 

* will be a factor. NSU 31, LTU 

* 17- 



Bob Ryder... It is not a 

question of who is going to win 
but by how bad we are going to 
beat them. If the offense can 
get it together, we might win 
big. NSU 33, LTU 14. 



Dr. Arnold Kilpatrick, 
President of NSU... The 
Demons are improving each 
week and the defense has been 
coming along real well. NSU 
has an added incentive in front 
of a large crowd NSU 20, LTU 
14. 




Dan McDonald, $10...- 
Tech's defense is subject to 
question after Texas- 
Arlington rolled up 56 points 
on them. Look for a high 
scoring contest. NSU 27, LTU 
17. 





Jerry Pierce, Director, 
Informational Services. ..NSU 
has explosive offense and 
tech's defense appears more 
vulnerable than at any time in 
the past. NSU 38, LTU 34. 



Jim Johnson, Asst. Info. 

Director...Good depth in the 
running game will make the 
difference. Look for Almond 
°Pen deep, and look for high 
scoring game. NSU 27, LTU 
10. 



* 

* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

* 

* 

* 
* 
it 
* 
* 
* 
* 

* 

Col well, Sports,* 
Times. ..This J 
year, La. Tech is struggling * 
through their worst season in * 
years. However, I believe that J 
Tech will want the win more. # 
LTU 22, NSU 10. * 




Dr. Richard Galloway, V.P., 
Student Affairs... This is one 
of those years that we can 
compete with them. We are a 
much improved ball team, 
and come Saturday night, we 
will win. NSU 20. LTU 14. 




id 



Steve 
Natchitoches 



***************** ** + *** + * + ** + * + + *^++++++++>f.>(.+ Jf ++ ¥ .± + ¥ . ]f .++++ 



October 19, 1976 CURRENT SAUCE Page 




STARTING OFFENSE: Taking a 
breather from their hard day of 
practice in preparation for the an- 
nual contest against La. Tech are 



front row (left to right) : Pat Collins, 
TE, Petey Perot, OT, Kim Gaspard, 
OG, Bill Hughes, C, Mike Boogaerts, 
OG, and Stan Foster, OT. The back 



row consists of Mike Almond, WR, 
Sidney Thornton, FB, Stuart Wright,' 
QB, Frank Haring, TB, and 
Wyamond Waters, WR. 




STARTING DEFENSE: The North- 
western Demon Defensive starters, 
who have played excellently against 
the run, will have their job cut out 
for them against Tech's passing duo. 

Demons -Dogs 



Starting for the Demon's on defense 
are front row (left to right): Pat 
Dauget, DE, Jerry Edwards, DT, 
Bobby Kirchoff, noseguard, Willie 
Washington, DT, and Gerald Savoie, 



DE. Backing them up will be Stanley 
Lee, CB, Mike Maggio, S, Roscoe 
Lewis, LB, Donnie Pistorious, S, 
U.L. Finister, LB, and Willie 
Mosely, CB. 



Being that this is the 
"Year of the Demons," and 
that the football team from 
Northwestern State 
University has not beaten the 
Bulldogs from Louisiana Tech 
since 1970, the time seems 
right for a change in the 
movement to the two teams' 
series record. 

Louisiana Tech leads the 
series 41-16-4 against the 
Demons and have completely 
dominated the play of the 
annual State Fair game the 



last several years. 

But coming into this year's 
battle it is the Demons that 
have the upper hand for a 
change. NSU, led by senior 
quarterback Stuart Wright 
and Sidney "Thundering Bull" 
Thornton on offense and 
Donnie Pistorious, Jerry 
Edwards, and Bobby Kirchoff 
on defense, have managed a 3- 
2 season record going into the 
Tech game, while the Bulldogs 
have a dismal 1-4 slate. 

As with all contests of such 



A time for a change 



importance to both teams, 
season records can be thrown 
out for this one. This year's 
fray appears to be building up 
as an emotionaly charged, 
hard-fought battle all the way. 

If one has to give a team the 
edge on the basis of emotion, it 
should lean toward NSU. The 
Demons have something to 
prove to the team from Ruston 
and that is that they are a 
better team than the one that 
got beat 42-14 last year. 
Defense will be the key to 



the Demon success. The 
Demon front line has played 
excellently against the rush, 
but appear to be a little weak 
against the pass. 

And the Bulldogs can pass. 
Their quarterback duo of 
Steve Haynes and Randy 
Robertson have amassed 
994 yards through the airways 
and have 10 touchdowns 
between them. 

The Demon offense will also 
have something to prove. 
Scoring only two touchdowns 



in last year's game, the 
running attack of Thornton, 
Schroeder, and Knecht will be 
a vital factor in the success of 
the Demons. The Demons will 
have to balance their attack 
by having a strong showing by 
Stuart Wright, quarterback. 

What it boils down to is this : 
Demon pride will greatly be 
lifted by a victory and La. 
Tech knows this. The 'dogs 
need this one to have a 
mediocre season. Throw away 
all past records 



Page 4 CURRENT SAUCE October 19, 1976 



NSU presents the State Fair Court 





The Queen 



LORRAINE 
BILLEADEAUX 



CAMMIE HARGIS 








CHERYL PURCELL 



MIKKI WELLS 



MARYLYN BARTEK 





DEBBIE PAGE 



JANE THOMPSON 



LIZ POSEY 



DONNA KING 



Wreck Tech activities 




Involvement is the password 



Go, Demons." This is the 
cry which will be heard all 
week as Northwestern 
prepares for the big game 
Saturday night. 

A week full of fun, spirit 
raising activities have been 
planned by the cheerleading 
squad and the school spirit 
committee. 

A "kick off" pre rally was 
held at midnight Monday 
night to begin the week's 
activities. 

How many pancakes can 
you eat? Tuesday will give 
students a chance to eat their 
fill in a pancake eating con- 
test. The SGA and the 
cheerleaders will travel to 
Ruston to play flag football 
against La. Tech's SGA. 

Do you remember the days 
of the Fonz? Probably not, 
since the Fifties were the time 
most students were making 
their entrance into the world. 
The cheerleaders have 
declared Wednesday as 
Fifties Day and encourage all 
students to dress the part. 

Though the time and place 
have not been decided upon, a 
balloon and dance contest will 
be held Wednesday. 

Bang, bash, clang ! ! ! This is 
the sound which will be heard 
as NSU students take out their 
frustrations on a car Wed- 
nesday afternoon. Finishing 
out the day's activities will be 
a pep rally in Iberville Dining 
Hall acting out several skits. 

The traditional bonfire and 
burning of the bulldog will 



take place Wednesday 
evening at 7:00 in the area 
across from Sabine Dorm. 

The most important element 
of the week and the game is 
the football team. A riverfront 
pep rally, preceded by a 
parade, will be held Thursday 
to honor the team. 

The annual "Wreck Tech" 
dance, sponsored by the 
SUGB, will be held Thursday 
evening from 8 to 12 in the 
Student Union ballroom. Delta 
Queen is the featured band for 
this dance. 

A mass exodus is scheduled 
for Friday as most NSU 
students going to the game 
depart and head for a fun- 
filled weekend. 

Saturday is the day of days. 
An early afternoon parade will 
wind its way to the area 
behind the Square where a pep 
rally will commence. 
Following the pep rally, the 
fourth annual Rally in the 
Alley will get under way. 

The parade starts at 2 p.m. 
from the Civic Center Annex. 
All participants should be 
present by 1:30 p.m. The 
parade will go up Crockett, 
right on Spring, another right 
on Travis, down to the River 
where the Pep Rally begins. 

Manor Calhoun Allen of 
Shreveport has declared 
October 23 as Tech- 
Northwestern Day. 

Some of the Rally in the 
Alley activities include Wet T- 
Shirt contest, beer drinking 



contest, poster contest, pie 
eating contest, and reduced 
prices on all drinks. 

The Northwestern Demons 
will take on the La. Tech 
Bulldogs in gridiron com- 
petition in the State Fair 
Stadium. The kick off for this 
match of brawn and brain is 
scheduled for 7:30 p.m. 

Pregame activities will 
start at 7 p.m. with the 

Let's 
Cheer! 

DEMON PRIDE 

Demon — pride 

Will pass those Bulldogs by 
P-R-I— D— E. 
Demon Pride. 

FIRE UP 

Fire up, (Clap-clap), 

Fire up, up, up 

Fire up, Fire-up, (Clap-clap), 

Fire up up up 

Sparks are flying 

Cause we are trying 

To fire up 

Fire up up up! 

★★★★★★★★★★★★ 

Notices for Homecoming 
Court nominations were sent 
out last Wednesday to all 
organizations. Deadline for 
turning in names is 4:30 p.m. 
Wednesday, Oct. 27. Note: 
Anyone who served on this 
year's State Fair Court will 
not be eligible to run for the 
Homecoming Court. 



presentation of the courts and 
their queens. 

Saturday morning the 
mayor of Shreveport will hold 
a brunch and reception for the 
courts, the SGA officials, 
college presidents and deans 
and the mayor's guests. Both 
schools participate in this 
social affair. 

During the week the 
cheerleaders will be looking 
for two groups of spirited 
students to award spirit sticks 
to. Points will be given on for 
the number of signs, par- 
ticipation in the Fifties Day, 
spirit for the Demons at the 
pep rally, and participation in 



the various contests (entering 
and winning). 

Northwestern's 
cheerleaders who will be 
instrumental in leading the 
spirit of NSU are Cheryl 
Babcock and Rhonda Henson, 
co-captains; Stan Haynes, 
Mike Dykes, Jamie Sanders, 
Fonda Henson, Bonnie 
Outlaw, Marylyn Bartek, 
Kathy Kelly and Evelyn 
Ashley. 

Times and locations of 
scheduled events will be 
posted around campus. 

The message should be 
clear to students— go out and 
support the Demons. 



Current Sauce 



Colette Oldmixon 

Editor 

Bob Ryder 

Managing Editor 
Paula Jetton 

News Editor 

Bill Bossier 

Sports Editor 
Olu Akinrinade 

Assistant News Editor 

Ronnie Buzzetta 
Assistant News Editor 



Rodney Wise 
Circulation Manager 
Mark Smith 
Advertising Manager 
Mark Bandy 
Business Manager 
Fair Hyams 
Mike Rabalais 
Photographer 
Franklin I. Presson 
Adviser 
Craig Berthold 
Cartoonist 



•lie "*a * Fair eoi,ion »• 'he CURRENT SAUCE, the official publication of 
i»"enie "a' """^ °* Norlhwes,erri S'ate University of Natchitoches. Louisiana. II 

Cu- rS i S Secona class ma 'ler ai the Natchitoches Post Office 
■hee'x ren '* SaUCe 5 Dub,ished ever v Tuesday during the regular school year with 
Ed.- 6P °" °' holioavs 6na ,es ' dates, and is printed at me Natchitoches Times. 

i OfiBI Off.ces are located In Room 225. Arts & Sciences Building Telephones 
ThiTs- eai ' orial ' anfl 357-6874 . advertising 
. h . ' . ' , a e Fa ' r eol'ion is prepared for 'he mforma'ron of 'he s'uden-s and >s no' 
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to INSl 

gold broead 
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CURRENT SAUCE 

Vol. LXIV, No. 8 NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY NATCH fTOCHES. LOUISIANA October 26 1976 



NATCH fTOCHES. LOUISIANA 



of 
be 

be 




Students decide KNWD future, 
increases : mock election slated 



DELTA QUEEN — Delta Queen performed in the Student Union 
last Thursday for the annual Wreck Tech Dance. The dance 
capped off a day full of events, including a car parade to the pep 
rally by the river. 



by Bob Rash 

Students go to the polls tomorrow to 
decide the future of KNWD-FM. The 
radio station is asking for an increase in 
student fees from $.50 to $2.00 in order 
to compensate for rising costs and new 
equipment. Also, they are trying to pay 
off a $5,250 loan from the SGA. 

According to Chuck Cason, General 
Manager of KNWD, the station was 
forced to buy substandard equipment 
that was intended for everyday use and 
not for professional use originally. The 
reason for this was that the license 
from the Federal Communications 
Commission (FCC) took only six 
months to be approved instead of the 
usual two years. In order to meet the 
time deadline set by the FCC, KNWD 
had to go on the air almost im- 
mediately. If they hadn't the license 
would have been revoked. At that time 
they lacked the funds to buy the needed 
professional equipment. In order to 
purchase enough equipment to go on 
the air within the required period of 



USL slated for homecoming 



by Marvin L. Horton 
Northwestern State University will 
celebrate a special Bicentennial 
Homecoming Saturday, Nov. 13. 
The 92nd Homecoming celebration 
trill recognize NSU as a leading in- 
Kitution of higher learning in 
Louisiana. 

"Proudly We Hail" — key words 
taken from a verse in "The Star 
jangled Banner" will be proudly 
iplayed throughout the campus, 
ftese key words will also be reflected 
!k the enthusiastic spirit of the student 
tedy. 

Homecoming will be highlighted by 
NSU-Southwestern game at 7:30 p. 
in the Harry "Rags" Turpin 
Stadium. 

: Dr. C. B. Ellis, assistant to the 
president and director of external af- 
fairs, along with graduate assistant 
Debbie Hebert are Homecoming 
coordinators. 

"The entire Northwestern family, 
which includes alumni, the present 
student body, faculty and staff, 
recognized that a tribute is due to those 
who 92 years ago started this school on 
the hill in Natchitoches," said Ellis. 

Alumni returning to celebrate 
homecoming will be greeted by an 



"extremely enthusiastic student body, 
Ellis said. 

Homecoming weekend will begin 
Friday evening Nov. 12 with a pep rally 
and presentation of the homecoming 
court. That night, the Student Union 
Governing Board will sponsor a dance 
in Prather Coliseum. The dance will be 
highlighted by the announcing of the 
homecoming queen. 

The homecoming queen and mem- 
bers of her court will be chosen during a 
campus-wide election, which will be 
conducted Nov. 3 by the Student Body 
Association. The queen and her court 
will be formally presented during pre- 
game ceremonies at the football game 
on Saturday night. 

The homecoming committee has 
planned numerous activities for 
visitors and the Northwestern family. 
The activities begin Saturday at noon 
with registration in the student union 
lobby. Registration will continue until 5 
p. m. 

A reception for the NSU family will 
be held in the Student Union Cane River 
Room from noon until 2 p. m. The 
Entertainers will be featured at this 
function. 

The Student Union, Greek houses, 




religious centers and, hopefully, the 
new student-financed recreational 
complex will hold open house from 2 p. 
m. until 4:30 p. m. 

An Alumni dinner has been scheduled 
from 5 p. m. until 6:30 p. m. in the 
Student Union Ballroom. 

At 7 p. m., pre-game activities will 
get underway. The halftone show will 
feature a special performance by the 
Demon Marching Band and the in- 
duction of new members into the NSU 
Hall of Fame. The university will also 
honor the undefeated 1966 Demon 
football team at its 10th reunion. 

Campus organizations are expected 
to dress the university campus with 
displays which carry out the 
homecoming theme. The winners of the 
three categories — ■ Greeks, residence 
halls and processional services and 
special interest groups will be 
presented awards during the game. 



SGA wins , 
ends slump 

by Bob Rash 

For the first time in the past four 
years the Northwestern Student 
Government Association Football 
Team defeated Tech's SGA team. 

On a muddy practice field in Ruston, 
in a steady rain the Demons took a 13-6 
victory. 

The team, captioned by SGA 
Treasurer Terry Downs overcame 
adverse weather conditions, a Tech 
home advantage, and obviously biased 
Tech officials in posting the win. 

It has been reported that Tech SGA 
officials placed a long distance call to 
the NSU SGA office in an effort to call 
off the game due to "inclement 
weather." Our SGA officials replied 
with a "Hell no!" adding "Of course if 
you want to forfeit, we will accept it." 
When Tech's stubborn SGA refused to 
accept the inevitable our team traveled 
to Ruston to defeat the "puppies." 



time, they were forced to go before SGA 
to borrow $6,000. Even with this money 
they were not able to buy professional 
equipment. 

Among the items needed now are 
turntables, a triple play cartridge 
machine ($1,000), microphones, and a 
new control board ($2,000), according 
to Cason. 

Cason added, "If the referendum 
passes, and we get the money needed 
for the needed equipment, there is a 
good chance that we will be able to 
broadcast live 24 hours a day. 



VOTE!!!! 



However, if the referendum fails, 
according to Cason, "... it means that 
the students don't want a radio station 
anymore. The only reward given to 
persons working at KNWD is personal 
satisfaction. If students indicate that 
they don 't want a radio station then that 
takes away from the personal 
satisfaction. Without the satisfaction it 
is doubtful that the station could last 
very long. We wouldn't have the money 
anyway. If the referendum passes we 
can pay the money that we owe to SGA 
back within one year, instead of within 
eight, which is the way we are paying 
back the loan at this time." 

The referendum tomorrow is a result 
of a bill passed in the Senate a few 
weeks ago. Among the persons who 
supported the bill were David Walker, 
Vice President of SGA and Bob Ryder, 



Senate Chairman. 

Walker stated, "The service that 
KNWD offers is a big asset to the 
campus. The majority of students that 
I've talked to have indicated that they 
are in favor of the increase. I think we 
will be doing a great disservice to the 
students if we close the station. They 
are one of the best campus radio 
stations I've heard and the increase 
could only make them better." 

According to Ryder, "Students are 
always griping about wanting bigger 
and better things for NSU, but they are 
seldom willing to fork up the money 
needed to fund these things. Compa- 
ratively speaking, $2.00 is not asking a 
lot of the students, considering the 
service that is rendered for them by the 
station." 

Ryder added, "I personally feel that 
we would all benefit from the increase, 
and I urge students to support the 
referendum." 

When the bill came up for a vote in 
the Senate, only three Senators voted 
against it. One of those Senators was 
Danny Dyess. 

Dyess had this to say regarding the 
issue, "I was originally in favor of the 
bill, but after I was confronted by a 
majority of the students on campus and 
they indicated that they were opposed 
to any increase of any kind, I changed 
my vote. Students already pay $39.75 in 
student assessment fees and I feel that 
$2.00 is too much to add. I think they 
should try to go commercial to offset 
the cost. Students also indicated to me 
that the station was not playing what 
they wanted to hear, and that it was 



interfering with the television reception 
on certain stations in certain dor- 
mitories." 

Dyess added, "When we start raising 
fees, students start raising hell. It's 
already cheaper to go to LSU that it is • 
to go to Northwestern." 

Dyess concluded the interview by 
stating, "I am just a poor boy trying to 
get a college education as many of us 
are, and I have to let my conscience be 
my guide for the rest of the common 
students at NSU." 

When told of Dyess' comments Ryder 
said, "I'm not exactly rich myself, but 
my conscience tells me that I would 
rather listen to KNWD while I study 
than a bunch of static that would take 
its place if the referendum fails. I don't 
think, all things considered, that an 
increase to $2.00 will be too much for 
anyone to pay — even common students 
like Danny." 

It has been estimated that if the radio 
station tried to go commercial it would 
initially cost up to $30,000. 

According to Cason, "One of the first 
things that would be done with the 
money would be to move the tower to a 
location where it would not interfere 
with television reception. 

Also on tap for the election tomorrow 
will be a referendum to provide for a 
$.25 student assessment fee for the 
cheerleaders. There has been no vocal 
opposition to this proposal, and the vote 
in the Senate was unanimous. 

There will also be a mock election to 
be held in conjunction with all of the 
other colleges in the state tomorrow. 
The choices will be Ford, Carter, 
other. 



or' 



People have lost faith 



by KEN LANDRY 
The American people have lost faith 
in the public institutions of this country, 
according to U. S. Sen. Edward W. 
Brooke. 

Sen. Brooke, speaking in the 
distinguished lecture series Thursday, 
said that the low esteem for the 
government "Marks the bottom of a 20- 
year decline in public acceptance of our 
institutions." He added the fact that the 
polls indicate that the public rates 
Congress as the biggest failure of all. 

In 1959, 85 per cent of Americans 
were proud of the nation's political 
institutions. This year, said Sen. 
Brooke, only nine per cent of all 
Americans feel that Congress is doing a 
good job and only 11 per cent feel 
positively about the Executive Branch. 

"There are three changes in the 
political system which create a new set 
of problems for us to overcome," the 
Senator said. 

(1) The acceleration of social and 
technological change. "The global 
revolution in our communications 
brought on by television and the space 
satellite has brought us the worldwide 
village in which we are all forcibly 
related to each other," said he. 

(2) "The disintegration of the two 
party system." It is likely that the 
number of independents will soon 



outnumber the members of the two 
major parties. A majority of the voters 
now vote for the candidate or issue 
instead of the party, commented 
Brooke. 

We are witnessing a deepening public 
apathy. "As people give up their 
historic political allegiances, they seem 
to be dropping out of the system 
altogether," Brooke said. "The nation 
will never rebuild the political system if 
only one-fifth of the nation's adult 
citizens are involved in the process," he 
said. 

(3) A new change is the openness in 
the political process. Brooke continued, 
a benefit of Watergate was that "The 
press woke up to its responsibility to 
find the facts and to alert the public." 

"In fact, when the press started truly 
doing its job and the nation saw some 
ugly truths, people tended to believe all 
those scandals were new to our time. I 
believe we saw instead the uncovering 
of ongoing shameful practices," added 
Brooke. 

This means ' 'That we will have to find 
new methods of overcoming the new 
negativism if we are to solve the 
ongoing social and economic 
problems," he said. 



Congress and the presidency as they 
exist today "Have not shown that they 
will meet this challenge." The 
presidential campaign "has bogged 
down in trivia." Attempts by both 
candidates to discuss differences in 
economic and foreign policies "have 
been hidden behind a smokescreen of 
innuendo about racial, religious, and 
sexual matters which have no place in 
national affairs," said Brooke. 

If the demise of the party system is 
accepted "we will then place a 
premium on the media candidate who 
can send us simple messages." The 
nation would "succumb to the dramatic 
executive, president or governor who 
can and does take her or his personal 
appeal directly to the public," he ad- 
ded. 

"I see potential for a real danger in 
such a system. It glorifies personal 
charm, the quick fix, the simple an- 
swer," stated Brooke. 

"There is no easy road, there will be 
no political messiah. If we want 
responsive and responsible government 
we must be that kind of citizen," 
Brooke said. 



ALLEY RALLY — Students celebrate at the annual Rally in the 
Alley sponsored by the Sports Page of Shreveport. 

I t's the Great Punk 'n Contest 

Hey Charlie Brown! 



by Stan Tyler 
With Halloween just around the bend 
T 1 ^ the night for ghost and goblins, the 
Relation of Student Artists of N.S.U. 
J 11 sponsor the first N.S.U. Great 
^k-n Contest. 

I ftules for the contest are as follows: 
j' Open to everyone 
j Subject must be a pumpkin. 
No 

limits on materials used, 
j' No limitations on size. 
: Entries must be received no later 
^ noon, Oct. 29, 1976, at the Art 
Piter. 

' ^ifty cent entry fee per entry. 
The purpose of the contest is to allow 
%orie to display their artistic talents 



and their imagination. An actual 
pumpkin does not have to be used but 
any material can be used as long as the 
end results resembles a Jack-O- 
Lantern. 

After all entries are received, they 
will be judged by the grade school 
students in Caldwell Hall. 

First Prize will be a $7.50 gift cer- 
tificate from a "thriving" local 
business in downtown Natchitoches. 

According to Cheryl Purcell, contest 
chairman, the proceeds will be used to 
buy much needed crayons and paper 
lanterns for the art department. 




Housing alters selection 



BUTCH BALLARD -- Quarterback Butch Ballard finally saw 
some action Saturday. See Game Story inside. 



NSU's Department of Housing is 
revising its selection process for R. 
A.'s. The revision will benefit housing 
and the students, according to Les 
Palmer, assistant director of housing. 

At present, housing is assembling a 
staff relations committee which will 
consist of two house directors and five 
resident assistants. The committee will 
serve in an advisory capacity to the 
director of housing on matters of policy 
formation and policy changes. The 
committee will also be responsible for 
establishing work standards and a code 
of ethics for work-study positions. 

The committee will meet at least 
once each month on a day and time 
established by the committee. A special 
meeting may be called by the director 
of housing or any two voting members 
of the committee. The committee will 
inform the director of housing of 
general grievances that affect a consid- 
erable number of house directors, 
residents, and residence assistants, 
Palmer stated. 

The power of selection criteria for 
resident assistants will be empowered 



by this committee. They will also 
review residence hall staff applications 
and interview all qualified applicants 
for the positions. The final appointment 
and placement of residence hall staff 
members will rest with the office staff 
and the respective house director of the 
residence hall in which there is a 
vacancy, explained Palmer. 

Palmer said, "The committee will 
aid in giving a direct input with the 
students because this committee will be 
working along with the students." 

The idea derived from a workshop in 
Houston attended by Palmer. "It was a 
great success there and I feel it will 
attempt to up grade the staff houseing 
at NSU," Palmer said. 

The two house directors are: Ted 
Fouler - West Rapides and Becky 
Brown — East Sabine. The four R. A.'s 
selected are Gary Brown — Nat- 
chitoches; Barton Sealy — Varnado; 
Mary Holcomb — Sabine; and Phyllis 
Backa — Sabine. According to Palmer, 
the fifth R. A. of the committee will be 
appointed later. 



* > • 



■■HHtl ■■■■■■ 



■ 



Page 2 CURRENT SAUCE October 26, 1976 



fc 



o 's Corner 



Readers Comment on Issues 



I was going through some 
old POTPOURRIS a couple of 
weeks ago when I came across 
the legend of the ghost of 
Caldwell Hall. Being that this 
coming Sunday is the day of 
grand celebration for witches, 
goblins, demons, and all types 
of creatures of evil, I thought 
it would be appropriate and 
interesting to recount the tale. 

"There once lived in 
Louisiana a beautiful French 
maiden whose beauty was 
renowned throughout the 
state. And, as anyone would 
know, this maiden had as 
many suitors as she cared to 
count, but there was one who 
received her favor above all 
others. And of course, he was 
the most handsome and the 
finest of all, in the opinion of 
this beautiful young girl. But 
alas! How could she know that 
disgrace was to be the fate of 
the gallant suitor, and that he 
was to be killed in a 
questionable duel of honor. 

Those who knew her tell how 
the delicate face grew pale 
and wan, and how her bright 
spirit became weak and sorro- 
wful as a dove mourning the 
death of its mate. Grief- 
stricken and heartbroken, she 
moved to Natchitoches, but as 
the years passed, there was 



nothing that could in any way 
bring back to her face the once 
ready smile, or could take 
from her face the lines of 
sorrow and grief. Not until 
dark stole over the town would 
she venture out of her solitary 
confinement to wander under 
the old trees surrounding the 
mansion. Some said that she 
had become quite mad, while 
others said that she walked 
under the trees to meet the 
spirit of her loved who waited 
there. 

Perhaps rumors of this 
came to the maiden; perhaps 
the burden of living became 
too great, for one moring, 
after a great storm had raged 
through the night, she was 
found dead in her room. A 
knife was beside her, and on 
the wall by her was the bloody 
print of her hand as it had 
grasped out as she fell. 

According to legend the 
ghost of the fair maiden still 
dwells in the oldest building on 
the Northwestern campus, 
and when it is torn down, she 
moves to the next one. At 
present, she resides in 
Caldwell Hall, in front of 
which stand the last three 
remaining columns of the old 
mansion in which she died. If 
you look hard enough you can 



even find on one of the walls a 
handprint which appeard the- 
re the night she moved in." 
When I was a freshman 

(many, many moons ago) I 
was told that when the moon 
was full and playing chase 
with the clouds, a close ob- 
server could see the maiden as 
she passed from room to 
room. On that first Halloween 
six of my friends and I decided 
to watch Caldwell Hall and see 
what we could see. 

The night was perfect; the 
moon was full and playing 
chase in the sky; the wind was 
whistling through the trees. 
About midnight the seven of us 
thought we detected a light 
moving through the third floor 
of Caldwell Hall. 

As we watched the light, it 
moved down the hall to the 
second floor. When we saw it 
come down the stairs to the 
first floor, seven very spooked 
girls turned tail and ran. 

Maybe it was the maiden 
and maybe it wasn't. I have 
never gone back to observe 
and neither have my friends. 

Who knows? Maybe this 
year on Halloween a group of 
lucky students will get a 
chance to watch the ghost of 
the lovely maiden tour the 
halls of her present abode. 




Current Sauce 



COLETTE OLDMIXON 
Editor 



BOB RYDER 
Managing Editor 



BILL BOSSIEB 
Sports Editor 



PAULA JETTON 
News Editor 



OLU AKINRINADE 
Assistant News Editor 

MARK BANDY 
Business Manager 

RODNEY WISE 
Circulation Manager 



RONALD BUZZETTA 
Assistant News Editor 

MARK SMITH 
Advertising Manager 

CRAIG BERTHOLD 
Cartoonist 



MIKE RABALAIS 



FAIR HYAMS 



Photographers 



FRANKLIN PRESSON 
Adviser 



Reporters— Muffet Richardson, Marvin Horton, Bob Rash 
Steve Parsons, Stan Tyler, Charlene Blume, and Ken Landry 




FREEDOM 

OF THE PRESS 



Current Sauce is the official publication of the student body of 
Northwestern State University in Natchjtoches, Louisiana. The 
newspaper is entered as second class matter at the Natchitoches Post 
Office under an act of March 3, 1879. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday during the fa 1 1 and spring 
semesters with the exception of holidays and testing periods and bi 
weekly during the summer semester.. 1 1 is printed at the Natchitoches 
Times, Highway 1 South, Natchitoches, Louisiana. 

Editorial offices are located in Room 225, Arts and Sciences, 
Building and telephones are 357-5456 and 357 6874, Business. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are solely those of the 
student editors and do not necessarily represent the viewpoint of the 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body of Northwestern 

Letters to Hie editor are invited and contributions are solicited from 
students, faculty, and staff and from student organizations. Letters 
must be signed and no more than 500 words to be considered for 
publication. Names will be withheld upon request. 
The staff of Current Sauce reserves the right to edit all letters for 
ke of journalistic style and available space. 



Pix set 

Appointments for POT- 
POURRI portraits (class 
pictures) are being made this 
week by the yearbook staff, 
for those students whose 
pictures were not made during 
the photographer's earlier 
visit to campus. 

Patsy Black, POTPOURRI 
editor, said she and her staff 
are making appointments at a 
table in the lobby of the second 
floor, Student Union. The 
hours are 10-3 MWF, and 9-3 
TT. 

Black said the photgrapher 
will return for four days only, 
Nov. 2-6. 

On Monday, Nov. 8, he will 
return to the Warrington 
Place campus of NSU. 



Dear Editor: 

During the past several 
weeks there has been much 
controversy concerning the 
students radio station, KNWD. 
I felt that someone had to put 
into plain, simple English 
what the whole deal is all 
about. 

First of all , it seems 
unusual for a radio station to 
ask for a fee increase when all 
the station would have to do, 
as Danny Dyess so brilliantly 
brought out in his letter to the 
CURRENT SAUCE, is sell 
advertising to support itself. 
That would be great but the 
FCC would not be too pleased 
with us. As stated on our 
license, KNWD is a non- 
commercial, 10-watt 
educational station. Some 
people have said, "Just go 
commercial." If it were as 
easy as to "Just go com- 
mercial," KNWD would have 
started as a commercial 
station. But as it is now, 
KNWD is the only 10-watt 
educational station that is 
completely student-owned, 
student oriented, student 
operated, and transmitting 24 
hours a day, seven days a 
week, in the entire state of 
Louisiana (including LSU). 

Turning KNWD into a 
commercial station would 
decrease the current air time 
from 24 hours a day to 12 or 
eight hours. During semester 
breaks, KNWD could not go 
off the air, which would mean 
a fullt-ime licensed engineer 
and staff which would have to 
stay here during Christmas, 
Easter, etc. These would be 
harsh demands upon per- 
sonnel that are not even being 
paid at all. Plus, in an hour's 
time, 22 minutes or more of 
commercials would be aired 
which would definitely 
decrease listening enjoyment. 
(By the way, listening en- 
joyment is KNWD's entire 
goal.) 

Going commercial would 
require a large full-time and 
definite staff and schedule 
which is terribly difficult 
when all we can work with are 
NSU students. And that's not 
counting the bit reasons like a 
new FCC commercial license 
(which takes from six months 
to two years.) Increasing the 
wattage and changing the 
frequency which would mean 
a new transmitter. A con- 
servative estimate for the 
necessary transmitter produ- 
ction andmonetary equipment 
would be above $30,000. And 
above all, the ideals of a 
student organization are for 
extended education and not to 
make money. 

The real problem seems to 
be whether the students want 
a radio station or not. KNWD 
was statrted with equipment 
that was below consumer 
grade, which simply means 
that it was never intended to 
be used by a radio station. 
This was done because of lack 
of funds. (If good commercial 
grade equipment was pur- 
chased in the first place, the 



Continue 

Peace 
and 
Prosperity 

Vote 

Ford-Dole 

and 

Spooner 

PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



student referendum would not 
be necessary.) However, 
KNWD is on the air without a 
cart machine or a reel-to-reel 
(both of which are broken.) 
And the turntables and 
broadcasting equipment are 
constantly going on the blink. 
Any business major can tell 
you that if you can buy 
something now that will save 
you a lot of money later, do it. 
Unfortunately, this could not 
be done a year ago and now 
the students of NSU are faced 
with losing what could be the 
finest campus radio station in 
the entire South, not to 
mention alot of money 
(student money) time and 
hard work. 

I'm sure most everyone 
knows KNWD owes the SGA 
$5,250 which is paid back 
slowly, per semester. If the 
referendum passes, the SGA 
will immediately get it all 
back within one year. If this 
referendum does not pass, the 
SGA will still be paid back by 
the students with the current 
50 cents assessment possibly 
without benefit of a radio 
station. 

There has also been much 
talk about television reception 
on campus. It seems that 
certain stations in certain 
dorms cannot be watched at 
times due to interference with 
KNWD. First of all, the TV 
reception was not that good 
before KNWD went on the air 
anyway. But even now plans 
are being made to solve this 
problem as soon as possible. 
This is another advantage of 
the referendum. 

Even though it has been 
mentioned again and again, I 
can't help mentioning that NO 
ONE at KNWD is paid for 
their work. Students from 
business, accounting, elec- 
tronics, speech, and jour- 
nalism, music and English 
have all been receiving 
practical experience in their 
field in operating a radio 
station. The personal 
satisfaction of providing NSU 
with a radio station is their 
only paycheck. The student 
assessment goes directly into 
the operation and betterment 
of the station. If the 
referendum fails, it will only 
mean that the students do not 
want a radio station. KNWD 
could not continue to broad- 
cast without the funds and 
certainly not without the 
initiative from the students to 
provide quality entertainment 
for them. 

Respectively , 
Chuch Cason 
General Manager, KNWD fm 



greatly disappointed in many 
of our students. 

At frequent intervals during 
Dr. Fletcher's speech, people 
just got up and walked out. 
This was not only disruptive 
and distracting to the 
audience, but it was totally 
rode to the speaker. There is 
no excuse for such behavior. 
Many of my friends that I look 
up to and respect, greatly 
disappointed me by being so 
rude and insensitive. 

Put yourselve in the 
speaker's situation. How could 
you feel if you were talking to 
a friend and they turned and 
walked away? Or one stop 
further, how would you feel if 
you had traveled hundreds of 
miles, and spent your time 
preparing a speech, only to 
have people get up and walk 
out in the middle of it? It 
leaves the speaker dishear- 
tened and desperately trying 
to regain the attention of the 
audience, who are all looking 
at the person getting up and 
leaving. 

I am not the only student 
who was perturbed at this 
inconsiderate and deplorably 
rude behavior, and we believe 
it is unfair to let a small 
minority disrupt the majority. 

Before you go to the next 
lecture, or to hear any 
speaker, ask yourself these 
two questions: 

1. ) If I find the speaker is not 
what I expected can I sit there 
and bear it until he finishes? 

2. ) Will I be the one to at- 
tract everyone's attention 
distract the audience, and 
disrupt the speaker without 
thought to everyone else's 
feelings? 

If you cannot answer "Yes" 
to the first question and "No" 
to the second question — 
DON'T COME!!! 

I realize that the people who 
do this are a small minority 
and in no way do they reflect 
the manners of the majority, 
but if you are a member of this 
minority, please show a little 
more consideration for the 
speaker and your fellow 
students. 

Disappointed, But Expecting 
a Change 



ways to get involved in NSU. 

So come by Room 214 of the 
Student Union and help make 
SPOTLIGHT happen in '76. 

Sincerely, 
Judy Gremillion 




Alpha Kc 



Dear Editor: 

We will appreciate your 
running the following in the 
CURRENT SAUCE. 

Infirmary Hours 
The infirmary at Nor- 
thwestern State University is 
staffed by: 

Dr. J. A. Thomas, M-T-Th, 
5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. 
Dr. Eddie Johnson, Wed., 
4:30-5:30 p.m. 

Opal R. Gimbert, R. N., 6 a.m. 
to 2 p.m., M-F 

Madeline Anderson, R.N., 2-10 
p.m., M-F 

The infirmary is open: 
6 a.m. to 10 p.m. M-T-W-Th 
6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday 
2-10 p.m. Sunday. 

At other times, the students 
are "on their own" for 
illnesses, at their own ex- 
pense. For accidents and 
emergency operations, 
students are covered by their 
insurance. The emergency 
room at Natchitoches Parish 
Hospital Is open 24 hours 
daily, seven days a week. 

Yours very truly, 
Opal B. Gimbert 



action. Such "legale 
dictums as the Ten 
mandments (which he i 
set of wise sayings") are J 
adheared to only when 
results are beneficial; ato 
times they might be rejjj f ivy Pie 
as wrong. Nothi, , their b 
absolutely nothing-i, (ter j in 
so 1 "*- e ct on S 

In proposing this empj- j passed 
form of moral judgment ft 08 ** 00 
Fletcher professes "l^ ebitoches 
concern" for people a record 
general. I think few pge on Th 

would argue wih his asserj be * v ' es 
that circumstances qff comrr 
situations. Moral sensith ' uncl ra ' sij 
requires flexibility and appreciat 
educated exercise rf one - 
judgment in the applicatioj 
principles (aren't our great s '0 ma Ti 
heroes those who ^[others i 
realized that "when in ia TauGa 



course of human 



events 



Dear Editor: 

RE: The letter from Danny 
Dyess about KNWD. 

Point of information Mr. 
Dyess! 

It is not cheaper to go to 
school at LSU than it is to go to 
school at Northwestern. Here 
are the facts that prove it. 

At Northwestern: Tuition is 
$189.25 for a student taking 12 



(ongrattus 

becomes necessary...," & ^toft the 
However, when we begin' We w0 
apply this sort of m,* ^ e c 
relativity to the vali ^ ever 
generally accepted in | " ^ 
Judeo-Christian ethic ( a rau ' s 0101 
widely outside of it) as f stay 1,1 ' 
trinsically right, an obvii ' Alumni 
difficulty becomes appanj » eeliend - 
Who is competent to jujF P* 3 * w 
what is best for everba resentati\ 
else? ional head 

No doubt Dr. Fletcher i^^' 
j • ... it brother 

sincere and responsible q T 

but to how many people d,^ 1 * 6 ^ 

he ascribe the maturity ^Taubi 

judgment required to mi 7Zu 
» . .... , booth on 

tain equilibrium m such ]Z ^ n 

mine field, of conflict! *°7' K 

priorme, .,.,,.„, 

assistance of absolute ma k Tpr _ 

principals? Shall we restt "J/^J 

qualitative decision-makinj ^ y . . 

a qualified elite ^ or shall , 

democratically declare evt and 

person a free moral agent ni , u 

. , , them, i 

the absolute power to a ^ ^ 



semester hours (a full time 

student); an air-conditioned ^cording to his personal j 

and noti 



Dear Editor: 

I am a freshman at NSU and 
I think the student body as a 
whole is one of the friendliest 
and finest student bodies 
anywhere, but when Dr. 
Joseph Fletcher spoke in the 
Fine Arts auditorium, I was 



Dear Editor: 

The SUGB coffeehouse 
committee is changing its 
name and its image. Plans are 
underway for a new, larger, 
and more entertaining format. 
In the past, entertainment has 
been good, but the small scale 

coffeehouse was not well 
attended. This year 
SPOTLIGHT will be bringing 
something different to the 
student body of Northwestern. 

But we need your help. 
SPOTLIGHT needs man- 
power. Anyone willing to 
work, and is a student in good 
standing, is eligible for the 
committee. SUGB committees 
are one of the best and easiest 



dormitory room (two people to 
a room) is $215 per semester; 
a five day meal ticket costs 
$290. The total cost to attend 
school at Northwestern is 
approximately $714.25. 

On the other hand, at LSU: 
A student taking 12 semester 
hours pay $220 for tuition; the 
cost of an air-conditioned 
room with two students living 
in the room is $323; for a five 
day meal plan at LSU the cost 
if $288. This comes to a total of 
$831 to attend LSU. 

This shows that Mr. Dyess 
was in error when he claimed 
that it was cheaper to go to 
school at LSU. In fact it is 
$117.75 more expensive to go 
to school at LSU. 

Now let's vote to raise the 
KNWD fee to $2.00 and it will 
only be $116.25 more ex- 
pensive to go to LSU.... 

Sincerely, 
Senator Lane Pittard 



pictures. 



Octobe 

North 
called to o 
1176 at 6.: 
V. Davis 
IcKellar 
tly into r 
purpose 
elect 
g in 
secoi 



So says the VA . 



"BOOMER" 
by CASSON/BROWN 



APPLICATION to&K> To 

ATT6NV school o^vez Tv\e 

Gl eilL ARC /WA\LA5l£ 

AT ALU VA Offices, ACTw/e 
VUTY STATIONS A^v 

//si 0Thi£& COUHTRigS . 



Dear Editor: 

I would like to present a few 
reflections on the thought- 
provoking lecture given by Dr. 
Joseph Fletcher on October 8. 
In place of the old-fashioned 
morality with which most 
have grown up, Dr. Fletcher 
offers us the "situational" 
approach. According to him, 
right and wrong are relative 
values, to be judged only in 
relations to the ultimate 
results of a given course of 



vision of "consequential^ 
ethics? It seems obvious til 
such license would lead 
anarchy. 



Even if we lay aside 
religious considerations, « 
must be alarmed by the bet 
to social stability implied i 
this morality of 
cumstances. certainly 
individual conscience atm 
be the ultimate authority, 
a conscience operatii 
without the benefit of absob 
moral principles is as 
gerous as a car with fai 
brakes (pity the person cai 
in the rush of somebody elsQ* 
"situational" ethics, wT 
may be totally different ftC ^ 

own! > ' Btor elect! 

In closing, I would like I tors — ! 
observe that consequential key Wise; 
ethics is hardly a new concef land, Da\ 

homores - 

Perhaps the "last wolftda Bah 
in situational ethics m Cathey, 
spoken almost 2000 years I hson move 
in a Jewish council rooflrtion res 
"...one of them, nad aided, mot 
Caiphas, being the high pr* r. Richard 
that year, said to them: ite in an< 
know nothing. Neither do J sew senat 
consider that it is expedil j Dayls 

one man should die for 1 ^ Advis 
people that the whole natl ^ng and 
perish not.' " Could l" cl1 to 1 
Fletcher provide us wit* Ma 
more far-reaching case * Fair t 
"situational" ethics? J** electl 
Nettie Cheney jjton, an 
"dbe anno 
* takin 
Report c 
10 ann< 
"tecoming 





Contact nearest VA office 



Appointments: 2nd Floor, SU 10 
Thru Oct. 29 9 

Photo Shooting: 9-5, Nov. 2-5, 
Rm. 315, SU 



STUD 

ted ope 
1976-771 
k qualified 

3 MvVf C Inan . s « 

!%refer( 
3 TT St in stu 

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y at ions-inf< 
h^MlSSI 
J; (313) 6 



October 26, 1976 CURRENT SAUCE Page 3 



h "legal 
the Ten (j. 
which he ejjfp 

only when c 



A, TTK1> 

7 _ 

'4 Z<4»B 



aka ex rrriM 

Greek Review 

n \y <e kiop £T r 



TKE 



f»S Defunct club reorganizes 



5*1 



neficial; atoql Alpha Kappa Alpha 
light be rej„ f ivy Pledge Club along 
!• Nothl, , their big sisters par- 
lothing— i s (t ed in a civic league 
set on Sunday, Oct. 17. 
ig this emu f passed out campaign 
al judgment lotion ^ sections of 
)f esses "lo, thitoches city. The Ivies 
or peopi t » record hop at Curley's 
hink few of <e on Thursday, Oct. 21. 
rih his assert ie Ivies are planning 
istances Xy community projects 
[oral sensitt f und raisin 8 activities and 
ability and appreciate support from 
exercise tjone 
he application 

1 Sigma Tau Gamma 

and Roses 



of 



en't our great) 
se who w * thers 
"when ig pa Tau Gamma would like 

anan event) 
jssary...," * i 

1 We would also like to 



congratulate the Demons 
doing their best against 

en we begin *' 
sort of mol* ^ e Cheerleaders for 
o the vaV^ everyone the week 
:cepted in f* ^ Tech ^ ^ 
ian ethic (#» u ' s thoroughly enjoyed 
le of it) as f to S!u *eveport as a 
jht, an obvif Ahunni we re in town f or 
omes appara]' 66 ^ 6110 -- 
)etent to ja*s P 831 week . a Si 8 Tau 
t for everh tentative from the 
ional headquarters was in 

, . , , jiitoches. He talked to all 
lr. Fletcher i|rbrothere 

esponstble « ^ are mderway for ^ 

h" y h Jf d,staas festival 0,18 y ear - 

ne maturity ^ TfiU jj^fo^g ^ have 
luired to im ^ Qn ^ downtown 
lum ui such 

of conflictl 

without 

absolute mo 
Shall we re 



sold 



on 

[front. Items to be 
not been decided, 
the brothers would like 
Terry Judice, who is 



cision-makinj 



social chairman, for doing 
kastic job in contracting a 

declar ' i - obtainin « tickets for 0,6 
y ec re eve ean( j ^ance and distribut- 
noral agent* thera mgking reseJ ._ 

power to i u at ^ ^ tai,, shreye 
bis personal ( ^ 
ansequentialU 
ms obvious thiL 

would lead I 



Alpha Kappa Alpha 

The Eta Chi Chapter of 
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority 
pledged eight young ladies 
into their Ivy Pledge Club on 
October 9, 1976. The ivies and 
their officers an»: ivy Linda 
Wright, president; ivy 
Gwendolyn Brown, vice- 
president; ivy Jj.ue Phillips, 
secretary; ivy Gwendolyn 
Murphy, treasurer; ivy 
Venesia Tuniorsi, and ivy 
Dorothy Roberson. All of the 
ivies attended church services 
on Oct. 16 at surrounding 
areas. 

The ivies had a car wash on 
Saturday, Oct. 16: and visited 
the Toddler Center. 

The ivies would like to 
congratulate Et ig Sister 
Sharon Mack ant) Big Sisger 
Cereece Smith for being 
chosen to be in 'Who's Who 
Among College Sftudents. 

Phi Mm 

All the Phi Mu s would like 
to congratulate Cammie 
Hargis, who is presently 
serving as president of Kappa 
Iota Chapter, for Ik ting elected 
to the State Fair Court We 
would also, like to 
congratulate Mai y Lyn and all 
the other memt>ers of the 
court 

Last Friday niight the Phi 
Mu's and their dates dressed 
up and went to the "Sadie 
Hawkins Dance" at the 
Jaycee Hall. The music was 
provided by "Bandit" and 
everyone had a fjreat time. 
Thanks go to Itebbi Bose, 
Jennifer Briggs and all the 
girls who helped on the 
decorations. 

Then on Monday night the 



KA's hosted a cnapter ex- 
change at their house on 
second street. We would like to 
thank all the KA's for their 
good southern hospitality and 
say that we really enjoyed the 

exchange. 
Congratulations to Vickie 

Downing, Jarja Wells, alumn- 
ae Sheila Posey and Jan 
Ruseil who were named to 

Who's Who. 

Delta Sigma Theta 

On Monday, October 11, five 
young ladies were initiated 
into the Pyramid Pledge Club 
of the Iota Mu chapter of Delta 
Sigma Theta Sorority Inc., 
Initiated were: pyramid 
Judith Green, president; 
pyramid Jacqueline Ivy, vice 
president; pyramid Saundra 
Pennywell, secretary 
treasureer; pyramid Crystal 
Moncrieffe, reporter; and 
pyramid Carolyn Norman. 

On Thursday Oct. 14, the 
pyramids set up a table in the 
cafeteria for their big sisters 
and themselves. The 
Pyramids and the Big Sisters 
of Delta Sigma Theta 
assisted the Voters Civic 
League of Natchitoches by 
issuing pamphlets to en- 
courage voters to vote for 
Jimmy Carter on November 2. 

On Sunday, the pyramids 
attended St. Anthony's Church 
on Fifth Street. 

They also attended the 
Wreck Tech pep rally on the 
riverfront with their Big 
Sisters. 

On Friday, Oct. 29, the 
Deltas and the Pyramids will 



chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon 
has elected Church Preston as 
our new secretary. Mike 
Anyan was appointed as 
House Director for the TKE 
House. 

Work has begun on the 
construction of the TKE 
concession booth to be used 
during the Natchitoches 
Christmas Lights Festival. 
Preparations are also being 
made for the upcoming Three 
Fires Ceremony to be held on 
November 6. The objective of 
Three Fires is to test the 
pledges on their readiness for 
initiation in January. After the 
Three Fires ceremony the 
TKE's will hold a Chapter 
Retreat to establish the 
chapters ideas and objectives. 

The TKE Lil Sis have ac- 
cepted three new members. 
They are: Danelle Tusby, 
Tammy Ortego, and Caroline 
Smith. The TKE Lil Sis of- 
ficers are: Cathy Willis, 
President; Denese Byram, 
Vice-President; Jackie 
Hebert, Secretary; and 

Sharon Cole, Treasurer. 
Sigma, Sigma Sigma 

The Tri-Sigma car wash, 
held last Monday and 
Tuesday, was a tremendous 
success. We would like to 
thank the City Bank and Trust 
for their parking lot and all the 
others who bought tickets or 
helped with the wash. 

Thursday, the 14th, the 
pledge class held an open 
house on Greek Hill for all the 
pledge classes in the 
sororities. Refreshments were 



take halloween goodies to the served and everyone enjoyed 
Todler Two Day Care Center, the get-togehter. 

TKE Plans for Tri-Sigma's an- 

The Epsilon-Upsilon nual Harvest Dance, to be held 



October 29, are underway. 
This year's social activities 
chairman is Martha Allen. 

Congratulations go to Mary 
Ackel, Debral Kilman, Dee 
Villard for being named to the 
1976-77 Who's Who Among 
Students in American 
Universities and Colleges. We 
also congratulate Rhonda 
Baham and Marylyn Bartek 
for being nominated for State 
Fair Court. We are also proud 
of Gwen Smith, Susan Heintz, 
Cindy Sheets and Vickie 
Kitchin for being named 
Sigma Tau Gamma Roses. 
Congratulations, Girls. 

Tri-Sigma is participating in 
picking up bottles for the 
Miller Company. 

Delta Zeta 

Delta Zeta has been actively 
involved in intramural sports 
this week. We started off by 
defeating Phi Mu last Wed- 
nesday in flag football and 
then went on to play Sigma 
Kappa and the BSU. Delta 
Zeta also participated in the 
tennis tournament this 
weekend with Joani Rosenthal 
and B. J. Shoun as our par- 
ticipants. We also played 
Volleyball this week. First we 
played Velvet Knights and 
then the BSU. Thanks to all 
the girls who participated. 

A Founder's Day Ceremony 
was held Monday, Oct. 25 at 
the Delta Zeta Lodge. We 
celebrated our 50th year on 
this campus and our 75 year 
nation wide. 

DZ is planning to hold a 
rummage sale this Saturday 
and a dance November 5. 

Congratulations to Debbie 
Page on getting on the State 
Fair Court 



After several semesters of 
inactivity, the defunct Inter- 
national Student Club has 
finally been reorganized. 

The club has been inactive 
for several semesters because 
of apathy and bickering 
among past members on 
whom should be elected of- 
ficers. The problem was 
compounded by the fact that 
there were many small groups 
in existence among the in- 
ternational students. Each 
group, therefore, nominated 
and voted for its nominee. 

The reorganization of the 
club has been made possible 
by the genuine interest shown 
by the new crop of in- 
ternational students. 

The club which was 
originally founded in 1961 is 



open to all the 43 international 
students currently enrolled at 
Northwestern State 
University. 

Its aims and purpose are 
three folds. Its first purpose is 
to exchange cultures and 
ideas in order to develop 
mutual understanding among 
international students. 

Second, the International 
Student Club is to promote 
friendly relations with native 
students based on respect for 
democracy. 

Its third purpose is to 
sponsor social activities on the 
campus in order to strengthen 
and capitalize on Demon 
Spirit. 

At the second meeting of the 
club Friday, October 1, the 
officers for the 1976-77 



academic year were elected. 
Olu Akinrinade from Nigeria 
was elected president, Jorge 
Mondragon of Honduras, vice- 
president; Anu Kakonen of 
Finland, secretary; and Tak 
Lok Cheung from Hong Kong 
was elected treasurer. 

Dr. H. Schroeder, a member 
of the NSU faculty, was 
chosen as sponsor for the club. 

Non-voting membership is 
open to all American students 
regardless of sex or race. 
American students who wish 
to join the club are advised to 
get in contact with any of the 
following students: Olusoji 
Akinrinade-352-6939, Jorge 
Mondragon -352-7635 or Anu 
Kakonen-352-2162. 

The club is expected to meet 
biweekly on Fridays. 



Rector receives award 



by Muffett Richardson 

Mr. Robert Rector has 
received one of five awards in 
the 31st annual La. State Art 
Exhibition for Professional 
Artists going on in Baton 
Rouge. 

With "Orange Fog," one of 
his two acrylic paintings Mr. 
Rector has received a $100 
prize. Rector is an assistant 
professor of art at NSU. He 
was one of three faculty 
members entered in the 
contest. 

Professor of Art Dr. Billy 
Joe Bryant entered two silk- 
screen prints and Dr. Grady 



Harper, acting head of the art 
dept., entered one watercolor. 
Their art works were 5 of the 
96 accepted out of 300 entries 
to the exhibition. 

The art exhibition started on 
Oct. 17 and will continue until 
Nov. 14 at the old state captial 
in Baton Rouge. The art 
exhibit is sponsored by the 
State Art, Historical and 
Cultural Preservation 
Agency. 

Townsend Wolfe, executive 
director of the Arkansas Art 
Center, is acting juror of the 
exhibition. Townsend was 
responsible for deciding 
whether artwork was ac- 



cepted into competition. 
Rapides Fair Art Exhibit 

Associate Professor of Art 
Dr. Mary Carolyn Roberts 
received a first place in the 
Watercolor Category in the 
Rapides Parish Fair Art 
Exhibit. 

Dr. Roberts was one of two 
faculty members in the fair 
art show sponsored by the 
Central La. Art Association. 
Mr. James C. Thorn, 
Associate Professor of Art at 
NSU, received an honorable 
mention in the Painting 
Category. A third category in 
the exhibit was Graphics, with 
no entries from Northwestern. 



Dorm workday is successful 



i lay aside i 
siderations, » 
ned by the 
ility implied 
ity of 

certainly 
tiscience 
:e authority, 
ce operal 
nefit of absol 
ties is as 
car with fai 
ie person cai 
somebody 

ethics, 
t different 



SGA at a glance 



October It 1976 
Northwestern Senate 
balled to order on October 
[1976 at 6:37 p. m. Absent 
IV. Davis. 

cKellar moved to go 
ly into new business for 
purpose of accepting 
election results and 
ig in new senators, 
eh seconded. Motion 



[ would like 
consequent 
t a new coi 

the "last 
al ethics 
t 2000 years 



announced results of 
tor elections as follows: 
- Marvin Roque, 
ey Wise; junior — John 
David McKinney; 
ores — Roger Adams, 
Baham; freshmen: 
Cathey, Charles Reed, 
moved to accept the 
council rooJltion results, Nugent 
them, naffl mded, motion passed. 
; the high pr* t. Richard Galloway then 
I to them: fee in and congratulated 
Neither do f new senators, 
it is expe* Dayls report ed on 
uld die for *** Advlsor y Committee 
ie whole nal and the President's 
" Could 1 11011 t0 the Board of 
ide us witb "ees. Martin discussed 
ching case * Fair ballot and an- 
ethics ? elections Wednesday 

fettieChene^!? 11011 ' ^ ^ resviXs 
«d be announced Thursday 

y* taking votes on 

Report campus. Martin 

* announced that 

■becoming notices go out 

jfcth of October. 

*ni Rosenthal, State Fair 
Nsan, announced plans 
**te Fair weekend, Lynch 
|ted on SUGB activities, 
discussed Student 
Committee meeting 
announced that Cable 
on was impossible to 
He stated that the 
ttee was working with 
on moving their an- 
te rid TV and radio 



fc 



Dyess moved to accept Bill 
No. 6 which states 
"...therefore be it resolved 
that the SGA of Northwestern 
State University does ap- 
propriate two hundred dollars 
($200.00) for use try the Drama 
Agency. Nugent seconded. 
(This bill had been tabled 
from September 27, 1976.) 
Pittard called question. Bill 
passed. 

C. Davis made the following 
appointments to the State Fair 
committee: Don na Nelson, 
Ben Trowbridge, Bill Land, 
Lisa Russell, Henry Grabner, 
Rhonda Benson, and Cheryl 
Babcock. 

C. Davis appointed Terry 
Downs as coach of SGA 
football team. Johnson moved 
to accept appointment. Pit- 
tard seconded. Ai>pointment 
accepted. 

Nugent moved to adjourn, 
Lane seconded. Meeting 
adjourned at 7:05 p. m. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Debbie Page, Senate Clerk 

October 18, 1 776 
The Northwestern Senate 
was brought to order by Bob 
Ryder on October 18, 1976 at 
6:32 p. m. Absent whs Pittard. 

Walker discussed service in 
the cafeteria, McKellar 
reported on the Wnsck Tech 
lance and announced that Dr. 
Hook and the Medi cine Show 
would give a concert this 
semester at NSU. Ryder 
discussed Mardi Gras 
holidays, and Rosenthal listed 
State Fair weekend activities. 

Marvin reported that an 
election would be held on 
October 27 for the KNWD and 
cheerleader referendums and 
a mock election for U. S. 
President would be httld on the 
same day. Martin also an- 
nounced that Octobeir 26 was 



the deadline for Homecoming 
Court nominations, and that 
notices for Mr. and Miss NSU 
go out on the 26th also. 
Election for Homecoming 
Court will be November 3 and 
for Mr. and Miss NSU, 
November 17. 

New Business 

Martin announced State 
Fair Court election results. 
Dyess moved to accept 
election results, Johnson 
seconded, motion passed. 

Homecoming nominees 
from SGA are Vanessa Davis, 
Debbie Hawkins, and Rhonda 
Baham. 

Walker appointed Gary 
McElwee and Ray Ranger to 
the State Fair committee. 
Nugent moved to accept 
appointments, Lane seconded, 
appointments accepted. 

Walker appointed Lane, 
Johnson, Reed, Wise, 
Thompson, Cathey, Adams, 
Breland and McKellar, 
chairman, to Committee to 
Revise Committee Sturcture 
of SGA. Nugent moved to 
accept appointments, Roque 
seconded, appointments 
accepted. 

Walker then appointed 
Cheryl Leduff to Student 
Services Committee. Johnson 
moved to accept, Lane 
seconded, motion passed. 

SGA party committee 



members were then appointed 
by Walker to include Lynch, 
chairman, Dyess, Baham, 
Page, Davis, Nugent, 
McKinney, Roque, and Pit- 
tard. Johnson moved to accept 
appointments, Lane seconded, 
appointments accepted. 
Donna Johnson was then 



appointed by Walker fresh- 
man associated. Nugent 
moved to accept, Dyess 
seconded. Motion passed. 

Nugent moved to adjourn. 
V. Davis seconded. Meeting 
adjourned at 7:10 p. m. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Debbie Page, Senate Clerk 




Halloween Carnival 

sponsored by 
the Eta Chi Chapter 
of 

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority 
Saturday October 30, 1976 
3:00 p. m. - 7:00 p. m. 
at 

North Natchitoches School Gym 
+There will be a prize given to the 
person wearing the spookiest 

costume. 
Please come out and enjoy 
food, fun and games ! 




Many improvements were 
made on the grounds 
surrounding Natchitoches 
Hall when a work day planned 
by the Natchitoches Dorm 
Council was successfully 
carried out on Saturday, 
October 9. 

Tools of various types were 
borrowed from the NSU 
maintenance department for 
use by the voluntary dorm 
residents who cared to take 
part in the activities to help 
beautify the the dorm. Ac- 
tivities ranged from picking 
up paper and trash on the 
grounds to shoveling dirt and 
trimming trees, all of these 
efforts resulting in a 
noticeable improvement in the 
appearance of Natchitoches 
Hall. 

Refreshments were served 
to the participants when the 
work had been 



Townsend, Rusty Reeves, 
Randy Carter, Perry Lopez 

d 



and Natchitoches Hall house 
director Roger Ostrem. 



Fraternity needs members 



Alpha Phi Omega, a service 
fraternity, is attempting to 
become established on NSU's 
campus, according to Roland 
Beasley, a member of the 
fraternity and advisor to the 
interest group. 

The fraternity will serve the 
university and the neigh- 
boring community. Alpha Phi 
Omega will initiate four 
projects per semester. These 
projects include a community, 
campus, fraternity and a 
national achievement of the 
Alpha Phi Omega. 



more about Alpha Phi Omega. 
Other activities are being 
planned for this chapter, 
Beasley said. 

Alpha Phi Omega meets 
each Monday in the Student 
Union. 



At present, Alpha Phi 
completed. Omega's interest group, the 
Residents who assisted in the Torch Club, has 15 members, 
work day operations included The club needs 25 persons who 
Gary Brown, Natchitoches will pledge in order to 
Dorm Council President; establish the chapter. 
Charlie Sonnier, Council Vice- 
president; Keith Thompson, On Thursday Oct. 14, a party 
Wayne Searcy, Peggy was given by the fraternity for 
Hammond, Sissy Smith, Doc interested people to find out 



Zeta Phi Beta 

The Archiana Club of Zeta 
Phi Beta visited the East 
Natchitoches and Culbertson 
Lane meal sight for the aged 
This is one of the many service 
and community projects 
planned. 

The members of the Ar 
chonian Club include: Ar- 
chonian Roxie Beck and 
Archonian Janice Fields. 



1-3 M*' 

1-3 TT 



IMPORTANT 
STUDY ABROAD ANNOUNCEMENT 

ited openings still remain on CFS accredited Academic 
'1976-77 Programs for Fall, Winter, Spring, or Full Year 
Qualified applicants. Students in good standing- 
L ^an, Sophomore, Junir, Senior Year are eligibile. Good 
'ty references, evidence of self-motivation and sincere 
*&t in study abroad and international cultural exchange 
more with CFS than specific grade point. For ap- 
rons-information: CENTER FOR FOREIGN STUDY- 
.^MISSIONS - 216 S. State - Box 606 - Ann Arbor, Mi. 
(313) 662-5575. 




Happy 

endings 
begin 
here 



LAYAWAY 

ACCOUNTS 

WELCOME 



Carter's 
Jewelry 



L Pizza inn % 



Page 4 CURRENT SAUCE October 26, 1976 



Great Scott! It's Fifties Day at NSU! 




CHILDREN WILL BE CHILDREN — Tommy 
Whitehead and Lola Campbell demonstrate their 
love for orange sherbet. 




STYLE FOR THE DAY — Mrs. Judy Boone 
models the famous Northwestern beanie, head 
adornment for the year. 







,two grou 
gered tii 
the use of 
Ue schoo 
pown hor 
[bring th 
• a month 
them 
pies. 

(be student 
that the 



MEAN JOE AND THE GREASERS 



by Colette Oldmixon 

VROOOMM!! went the 
cycles as they rolled into 
Iberville Dining Hall last 
Wednesday during the 50's 
Day pep rally. 

The toughs, dressed in the 
style of the day— blue jeans, 
tee shirts, Jackets, slicked- 
back hair and dark glasses, 
were introduced as "Mean Joe 
and the Greasers." After a 
short speech by Mean Joe's 
brother, the group proceeded 
to draw shrieks of madness 
from the chicks as they per- 
formed their rendition of "The 
Duke of Earl." 

"In the Mood" was the next 
act of the evening, performed 
by three lovely dames- 
Bonnie Outlaw, Vickie 
Tucker, and Lee Ann 
Blaufaus. 

Once these two musically 
inclined groups set the scene 
the evening was off to a great 
start. Tears of laughter were 
to run down the cheeks of 
students observing the 
evening's festivities. 

The faculty and ad- 
ministration were not to be 
left out of the act. Dr. C. B. 
"Lum" Ellis and Dean 
Frederick Bosarge tried to put 
the swivel in their tups as they 
competed in the hula hoop 
contest. 

A special event was held for 
the faculty and ad- 
ministration. With their hands 
behind their backs, the con- 



testants bad to eat their way 
through a bowl of orange 
sherbet. Competing were Dr. 
Thomas Boone, Mrs. Judy 
Boone, Dr. Ellis, Dean 
Bosarge, Mrs. Elise James, 
Tommy Whitehead and Ms. 
Lola Campbell. 

Dr. Boone was declared the 
winner with his wife running a 
close second. One of the 
contestants was overheard 
saying "I will never eat 
orange sherbet again." 

Mrs. Boone and Mrs. James 
dressed up for the occasion. 
Mrs. Boone sported a beanie 
that dated back to the days 
when NSU freshmen had to 
where such head adornments 
until NSU won the NSU-Tech 
game or Thanksgiving, 
whichever came first. 

A variety of student oriented 
contest were held. In the 
Bubble Gum contest Dennis 
Terry blew the biggest bubble 
and Jack Brittain, a member 
of the Demon Football team, 
had the most pieces of gum in 
his mouth. 

With only 30 seconds to 
organize a plan of attack, 
Kappa Sigma won the mat- 
tress contest. They piled 15 
people on top of one little, 
insignificant mattress. Taking 
second was the NSU baseball 
team with 14 and Kappa Alpha 
with nine. 

"And they swam and they 
swam right down the throat," 
was the theme of the third 
contest of the evening. Six 



brave souls with cast iron 
stomachs captured a little 
goldfish and swallowed it. 
Winning "Wreck Tech" tee 
shirts for this courageous act 
were Julie Tuminello, Ruth 
Dennis, Kurt Felton, Fair 
Hyams, Tony Bailey, and 
Mike Oleske. 

The cheerleaders got into 
the act with "Boogie Woogie 
Bugle Boy." Mike Dykes did 
an impersonation of the star of 
the fifties and every girl's 
idol— Elvis Presley. 

The 50's Day cheerleaders 
led the crowd in some of the 
oldies but goodies of the hey 
days. Participating in these 
were Rhonda and Fonda 
Henson, Kathy Kelly, Mary lyn 
Bartek, and Cheryl Babcock. 

Have you ever placed an 
orange under your chin and 
passed it to another person? 
and another? and another on 
down the line? Where it really 
gets sticky is when you 
reverse the action and a 
certain couple loses its 
balance and ends up on the 
floor. But, then, some people 
"will do anything for 
publicity." 

Moving in and out of the 
evening's activities with an 
air of ultimate coolness was 
"The Burk." "I am The Burk, 
not to be confused with my 
cousin The Fonz," was the 
only thing Alton "The Burk" 
Burkhalter said about his 
priceless performance. 

Students were observed 



holding their sides they were 
laughing so hard at the antics 
of the cheerleaders and 
participants. The mood was 
infections and very much in 
keeping with the Tech Week 
spirit. 

"The student body has 
really been great in sup- 
porting the team this year and 
I know the football team really 
appreciates it. The students 
are really great!" remarked 
Marylyn Bartek, the 1976 
State Fair queen and NSU 
cheerleader. 

Highlighting the evening 
was the annual bonfire with 
active student participation. 
NSU students, in full voice, 
sang and yelled their support 
of the un equaled Demon team 
as the flames grew higher. 

According to Stan Haynes, 
NSU cheerleader, "Everyone 
was cooperative. The bon 
fire was terrific; the best I've 
seen at any pep rally. It was 
great." 

Other activities held at NSU 
to get the students prepared 
for Saturday's game were a 
pancake eating contest, a 
parade, and a riverfront pep 
rally honoring the football 



SWIVEL THOSE HIPS — Dr. C 
showed students the finer points 



B. "Lum" Ellis 
of hula hooping. 



Let 9 s go 



"I'M ALL SHOOK UP" — Elvis Presley, alias 
Mike Dykes, stunned the chicks with his swiveling 
hips and characteristic hand gestures. The dames 
were at his feet. 




BLOW HARDER! ! - This young man couldn't 
stop laughing long enough to blow the bubble. 



I AM THE BURK — "I am the Burk 
not to be confused with the Fonz," 
this young man stresses with 
ultimate cool to Gail Banks ton and 



her friend Debra. Gail keeps 
fingering her steady's ring as though 
The Burk would make a better 
catch. 



by Muff el 
t dawn bi 
cning a 
efooted i 
his dr 
besidc 

morning 
jeren back 
■hasrippt 
jod and fc 
lis page! 

Its, woms 
her 
kids may 
dad must 




PILE 'EM UP — These boys attempt to cover the 
mattress with as many as possible in 30 seconds 



team. The SUGB sponsored a — — — — — — ™ — * public 



dance Thursday 
featuring Delta Queen. 

The NSU cheerleaders and 
the Spirit Committee, chaired 



r 
i 

■ 
■ 



by John Breland, put together j 
a week of activities that were \mf 
lots of fun and full of spirit. 



IN THE MOOD — With these lovely 
dames serenading you, would you 
"try their hps on for size?" Bonnie 
Outlaw, Vickie Tucker, and Lee Ann 
Blaufass played the chicks. 



by KEN 




learned to fall 



By Bob Rash 

5U is only one of a few 
pols across the nation that 
jfS a major in Equine 
,fice. The basic course in 
. curriculumn is a hor- 
^nship program which is 
3 to anyone. 

je course, which is taught 
jrs. Cecile Hetzel, is in the 
jog as Equine Science 170. 
Hetzel, who is head of the 
jne Science program at 
[, has been teaching the 
ge since last spring. The 
is designed to help 
its learn how ride a 
or how to work with a 

class, which consists of 
Is and two boys, meets 
ay, Wednesday, and 
y from 1-3 p.m. 
(ever, the class is divided 
1 two groups who come at 
gered times. The class 
tbe use of 10 horses owned 
Hie school or may bring 
town horse to ride. Those 
1 bring their own horses 
a monthly stable fee to 
L) them at the school 
Les. 

me students in the class all 
Ij that they were enjoying 



the class and getting a lot out 
of it. As stated by one young 
lady, "I learned how to fall off 
without getting hurt." 

The course teaches the 
students how to ride Western 
and English style. They are 
also taught how to fall off the 
horse and how to care for their 
horses. 

The course is not without its 
ups and downs. One day, the 
horses were feeling pretty 
good and threw four different 
riders. There have been in- 
stances of a couple of students 
not putting their saddles on 
tight enough and later having 
them slip off. The students 
reported that one day they 
were chased by a crop duster. 
The students are chased by 
dogs often so the horses are 
about used to them. 





Rodeo success 



WHOO THERE!! — This en- 
terprising young cowgirl leaves the 
shoot on the back of a bucking bull. 



She was only one of many who tried 
their luck at the NSU Agriculture 
Rodeo a couple of weeks ago. 



Miller 
holds 



11" Ellis 
hooping. 



Try typing a game play-by-play cont ™* 



by Ken Landry 

Rodney Champion and 
Mercedes Black were named 
all-around cowboy and 
cowgirl respectively, at the 
completion of NSU's 
Agriculture Club Rodeo, 
Thursday Oct. 7. 

In the individual events, the 
bareback bronc riding event 
was won by Rodney 
Schamerhorn with Greg White 
and Rodney Champion tied for 
second. 

Runner-up all-around 
cowboy was Tim Brazzel 
while Teryn Tate was the all- 
around cowgirl runner-up. 

Janice Erickson and 
Braunice LaCornb took first 
place in the goat sacking event 
while Lisa Lyon and Renee 
Ryan finished second. Third 
place went to Emily Madden 
and Beverly Martin. 

The breakaway calf roping 
event went to Heidi Hughett 
with a time of 25.3. Tim 
Brazzel and Rodney Cham- 
pion finished second and third. 

First place in the calf 
scramble went to Jo Lynn 
Burleston with Janet 
Thompson coming in second 
and Emily Madden third. Lisa 
Lyon won the wild mule race 



and Phillip Scroggs finished 
second. 

With a time of 24.0 Mercedes 
Black grabbed first place in 
the poll bending event while 
Teryn Tate and Gail Thomp- 
son finished behind her. 

Teryn Tate and Rodney 
Champion teamed-up to take 
first place in the buddy barrel 
pickup with a time of 11.0. 

As Greg Howell and Rodney 
Champion were grabing the 
team roping event, the wild 
cow milking event was being 
won by Gary Brown, Tom 
Permenter, and Mel Cox. 

While Mercedes Black was 
squeezing by Teryn Tate and 
Heidi Hughett in the barrel 
racing, Rodney Champion 
edged Gary Brown and Frank 
Piccolo for first place in the 
bull riding contest. 

The rodeo, which attracted 
some 1,500 spectators, was 
produced by The Tommy 
Baker Rodeo Co. of Frierson, 
La. 

David Morris of Cheyenne, 
Wyo. acted as arena director 
while the announcer was Jim 
Briggs. Judges for the rodeo 
were Dr. Jack Pace and Jim 
R. Johnson. David Levy, Jack 
Hughes and Terry Sklar were 
the clowns. 



3 

I 



4 




by Muffett Richardson 
1 dawn breaks on Sunday 
ming a sleepy-eyed and 
Mooted man rushes out 
(o his driveway or into 
pes beside the patio to find 

1 i morning paper. Before he 
' ifven back inside the early 
. lihas ripped off the rubber- 
1 Hi and found what?— the 
fcts page! 

! pes, woman can rummage 
; |ough her society section, 
I kids may read the comics, 
" v kdad must have the football 

pres. What he searches for 
in answer to that ever 

tortant question, "Did my 
mi win?" 

(t's suppose dad turns to 
action we speak of and 

# instead of the football 
in their bazaar sports 

I k a story about what 

• ■ened in the pressboz 
ig the game. 



Watching our team win, as 
the Demons have been doing, 
is not nearly as exciting as 
TYPING every play of the 
game while watching them 
win. It is like doing two 
relatively simple tasks at the 
same time, making both 
rather difficult. In my case a 
good example would be 
chewing gum and walking at 
the same time. 

What I am trying to explain 
is how my job in the press box 
can be both a pain and a 
pleasure. I type our home 
football games play-by-play 
and as far as anyone knows I 
am the first girl to do so at 
NSU. 

If you, as an onlooker at the 
game, think the bugs are bad 
where you are sitting, imagine 
having to type around two 
crickets in your IBM Selec- 
tric. This never occurs until 
the Demons make a com- 
plicated play which results in 
a touchdown. Everyone is 



screaming the details of the 
play while I watch these two 
crickets jitterbug on my ditto 
paper in the typewriter. When 
they are through dancing and 
clear the floor (or should I say 
keys?) I can type. 

Meanwhile everyone, in- 
cluding the football team, is 
ahead of me by nine or ten 
plays. Now my boss, Dan 
McDonald, begins pulling out 
his hair and chewing his nails 
while assuring me that 
"everything is o.k., just calm 
down!" He and four frantic 
statisticians bark out the 
plays until I finally catch up. 

If I make the mistake of 
getting nervous, everyone 
around me can tell. The give- 
away clue is that my hands 
keep sliding off the typewriter 
keys because they are so 
sweaty. I am really looking 
forward to cold days ahead 
when those clammy fingers 
turn blue and freeze onto the 
keys. 



I haven't mentioned the 
close quarter in which we 
work in the temporary 
pressbox. Have you ever 
typed with an elbow in your 
ear and a foot on your left 
shoulder? I'm not complaini- 
ng. It's just that I am tired of 
rewinding my typing ribbon 
every time someone in the 
back sneezes. 

Being a shorter member of 
the press staff has a disadvan- 
tage also. The first game in 
our new stadium it was 
discovered that I could reach 
the typewriter keys if I stood 
on my toes and stretched. 
There was no chance on seeing 
the top of the typewriter. Mr. 
McDonald came to the rescue 
by allowing me to sit (what a 
chance he took!) on his 
briefcase in a chair. Whoever 
said "Necessity is the mother 
of invention" certainly heard 
of the Sears and Roebuck 
catalog method of getting 
little people closer to the 
dinner table. 



When the game is over, fans 
and players clear out of the 
stadium and the lights on the 
football field are turned off. 
Remember the Well, they 
migrate to the well-lighted 
pressbox and invade any 
available space, including 
eyes, ears, noses and mouths. 
Yummy! At this time there is 
a mass exodus of sports 
writers out the pressbox door. 

What would dad do if he 
found a story such as this one 
replacing the football scores? 
He would probably get mad 
and call the paperboy to 
complain. However, if the 
story was only included as an 
extra article in "his" sports 
section of the paper, he might 
not mind; he might even read 
it. 



by Bob Rash 

The Miller Brewing Com- 
pany has announced that they 
are sponsoring a new contest 
for all campus groups. The 
contest, called the Fall '76 
Pick-em-up, is a reclamation 
project in which the company 
is trying to recycle old beer 
cans, beer bottles, and kegs 
that are made by the com- 
pany. 

The contest, which ends 
December 8, is open to all 
fraternities, sororities, dor- 
mitories, and other campus 
groups. The contest is divided 
into two divisions, the 
fraternities in one and all 
other groups in an open 
division. 

There will be three prizes 
given out on each campus. 
Their winner in each division 
will get a choice of several 



grand prizes. Regardless of 
the division, the next groups 
will receive a choice of a 
second and third place prize. 

The contest is scored on the 
amount of points a group can 
accumulate during the given 
time. Points are awarded on 
the type and amount of bot- 
tles, cans, and kegs that the 
group has turned in. All Miller 
Brewing Co., bottles earn one 
point per pound, all company 
cans earn 30 points per pound, 
and all Miller reclamation keg 
stickers are worth 50 points. 

In order to win a prize, the 
participating groups must 
meet certain point levels. For 
third prize, a group must get 
at least 2,000 points; for 
second place, a total of 3,000 
points must be achieved; and 
for the grand prize, the win- 



ning group must have sur- 
passed 5,000 points. However, 
should a group fail to reach 
the mininum point totals and 

still be eligible for a prize, 
their selection will come from 
the appropriate category. 

In order to enter the contest 
or to get further information 
on the contest, one should 
contact Mike Harville, the 
campus representative. 




'oils measure public attitudes 



cover the 

seconds by ken l an dry 

public opinion poll is a 
of measuring public 
« toward issues and 
duals by questioning a 
cally chosen group. 

41s are sometimes taken 
[determine the popular 
"Be to a commercial 
'»ct or a television 
r sm; although it is 
»bly better known for 
■urlng feelings about 
"eal issues and can- 



ou 
lie 
nn 




the I960 presidental 
Wgn John F. Kennedy 
* total of 70 polls taken. 
» the results of each he 
•ble to determine which 
approaches had the 
lest popular appeal, and 
refore planned his 
ign strategy and 
a accordingly. 

there are many 
ties of sampling 
dures the two most 
on types are quota 
•es and probability 

using quota samples 
'ewers are assigned 
of men and women of 
ages and economic 
to interview. Within the 
°f their assigned areas 
^tas they are free to 
respondents as they 



.Probability samples, 
hewers are assigned 
opiated individuals or 
j°lds selected by some 
leal device — such as 
"th line in a listing - 
guarantees that each 
of the "universe" has 
■ or known probability 
^Presentation in the 

opinion survey to be 
' must represent the 
°f the group whose 



opinion is being sought. 
Rather than questioning every 
individual in the group, 
poll takers work with a cross 
section of the whole group, 
which they call a sample. 

Once a sample of the group 
to be polled is chosen it usually 
represents only a small 
percentage of the group, 
usually 1,200 to 1,600 persons. 

Such a sample, scien- 
tifically chosen on a 
probability basis so that every 
adult in the country has an 
equal chance of being in- 
terviewed, would tend to 
reflect the national percenta- 
ges of men and women; blacks 
and whites; Democrats and 
Republicans; Catholics, Jews 
and Protestants, and so on. 

Questionnaires carefully 
designed are submitted to the 
sample so as to obtain useable 
data. Conclusions are made, 
through scientific analysis of 
the data, that are considered 
to represent accurately the 
views of the entire group. 

After the sample is com- 
pleted, the interviewers are 
told exactly where to go and 
which member of the 
household is to be interviewed. 

The prepared questionnaire 
contains a variety of questions 
pertaining to such matters as 
the respondent's past voting 
habits, occupation, age, 
religion, and income. 

Some questions require a 
direct answer or statement of 
opinion on the subject under 
investigation. Others require 
only a simple 'yes' or 'no' 
answer on the issues, or have 
multiple- choice answers. 
These are followed by 
questions seeking to find out 
why a person answered as he 
did, for the reasons for a 
particular preference can be 



very important to a political whelming victory for 
candidate. Roosevelt. 

Questionnaires are a post-election analysis 
generally tested before they showed that the sample 
are used in a national poll, questioned in the poll had been 
Testing shows such faults as chosen from telephone 
overlong interviews, unclear directories. In the depression 
phrasing in certain questions, year of 1936, few people in low 
and questions that tend to income groups had telephones 
elicit vague answers. After and therefore were not 
testing and revision, the reached by the poll. The 
questionnaires are sent to sample was not a cross section 
interviewers in the areas of the voting population and its 
selected in the random attitudes did not reflect those 
sample, of the whole nation. 

When interviews are 
completed, the questionnaires 11 1948 a national 1)011 to 
are mailed back to the home predict Presidential election 
office of the opinion-research results faUed because U reUed 
company. There they are on attitudes expressed a con- 
tabulated in categories such siderable time before fe e 
as religion, sex, political af- exf- 
oliation, economic status of Early polls showed Gov. 
the respondent and the region Thomas E. Dewey of New 
in which he lives. York so overwhelmingly ahead 

Answers are then fed into a 01 President Harry S. Truman 
computer where the in- *** most national poll takers 
formation is gathered and discontinued their polls three 

to four weeks before the 
election. The voters switched 
in such large numbers to 
Truman that he was elected. 

The incidents of 1936 and 
1948 helped polltakers im- 
prove their methods. The 



reduced to manageable form 
ready for analysis. Even the 
most seemingly unimportant 
detail is analyzed, for the key 
to public opinion polling is the 
analysis of the figures. This 
analysis constitutes the final 

report of the poll embodying sample is now chosen with 

preferences and reasons for probability precision, and 

preferences. polling is continued up to the 

Before polltakers selected 1481 P 083 ^ moment before 

samples according to an election, 

mathematical rules, their The validity of the scien- 

results were sometimes very tifically conducted poll was 

inaccurate. demonstrated in 1964, when 

In 1936 Literary Digest both the Gallup Poll and Louis 

undertook to poll a large Harris and Associates, Inc. 

national sample on attitudes forecast the outcome of the 

toward the presidential presidential election within 

candidates, President two percentage points. The 

Franklin D. Roosevelt and Gallup Poll again demon- 

Gov. Alfred M. Landon of strated its ability in 1968 when 

Kansas. The poll showed it gave Richard Nixon 42 per 

Landon ahead of Roosevelt by cent of the vote. Three days 

a wide margin; but the actual later Nixon received 43.4 per 

election result was an over- cent of the vote. 



(V 



Win valuable prizes for your organization. All 
you do is collect empty Miller bottles (1 pt. per 
pound) and cans (30 pts. per pound) and re- 
ceive a coupon for the points earned. The top 
point earning organizations will win their choice 
of many valuable prizes. 

Any campus group is eligible . . . 

No purchase necessary. Enter today! 

For further information contact your campus 
rep today. 

MIKE HARVELL 

Campus Rep 

TfilpphnnP 352 - 4 Q5Q 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON COLLECTION DATES CONTACT: 
NATCHITOCHES BEVERAGE, INC. 607 ST. DENIS, 352-6511 



Page 6 CURRENT SAUCE October 26, 1976 



Bulldogs spoil the Demons ' dream/ 
Eight minute nightmare is all it took 



Almost anything can happen 
in eight minutes in a football 
game. 

Just about everything did 
happen to the NSU Demons in 
an eight minute span in the 
second quarter. Two fumbles 
and a pass interception gave 
Louisiana Tech all they 
needed to whip the Demons 35- 
6 in the annual State Fair 
game. 

As had been expected, the 
La. Tech offense would come 
out throwing the football to 
test NSU's defensive secon- 
dary. It really wasn't much of 
a test because the secondary 
wasn't anywhere to be found 
most of the night. Tech 
quarterback Steve Haynes 
completed passes at will to his 
surehanded receivers in Billy 
Ryckman and Rod Foppe. 

On the opening drive of the 
game, La. Tech moved stead- 
ily down the field for an 83 
yard TD drive. With a third 
and eight at the Demon 10, the 
Tech quarterback had to 
scramble for his life to escape 
the Demon rush but fired a 
pass into the endzone to Rod 
Foppe who made an excellent 
diving catch. 

This was all of the scoring in 
the first quarter but the 
curtain was about to fall on the 
Demons. 

NSU, running Sidney 
Thornton almost every play, 
managed one first down, in 
seven plays and had to punt 
the ball to Tech. 

It took Tech four plays to go 
41 yards for a score, that being 
a 33 yard burst through the 
middle of the line by John 
Henry White. The other big 
play in this drive was a 26 yard 
play from Haynes to Larry 
McCartney. 

This is the eight minute 
period the Demons would like 
to forget happened. After the 
kickoff, Sidney Thornton 
fumbled the ball on a second 
down run and it was recovered 
by Tech's Lack Jones on the 
NSU 30. On Tech's first play, 
Haynes fired to Billy Ryck- 
man in the endzone for a 
score. 



The next time the Demons 
got the ball, it was Stuart 
Wright fumbling away to the 
Techsters, this time at the 31. 
A penalty for unsportsmanlike 
conduct against NSU put the 
ball in for the fourth Tech 
score. 

Once again the Demons 
decide to play Santa Claus by 
giving Tech another six point 
present. On the next Demon 
possession, Wright's pass was 
intercepted by Larry An- 
derson and returned to the 
five. 

A penalty put the ball at 
the two and a half and Arry 
Moody scored his second TD 
of the night by going over the 
endzone line from there. Jerry 
Pope was good on all PATs, 
making the score 35-0 Tech at 
the half. 

At this point many fans were 
filing out, for they were 
shocked to see the score the 
way it was. Tech had amassed 
325 yards total offense to 
NSU's 62 in the first 
half .Quarterback Steve 
Haynes picked the NSU 
secondary apart, going 10-12 
for 183 yards and 3 TDs. 



The second half saw sub- 
stitution on both sides of the 
line. Butch Ballard came in 
for Stuart Wright, who had 
completed only one of six for 
four yards and had one picked 
off. Tech kept most of their 
starters in for a while, but 
Randy Robertson came in to 
relieve Haynes at QB. 

Tech managed several other 
scoring opportunities but fum- 
bles and better defensive 
playing by NSU kept them 
short. Jerry Pope's attempted 
field goals of 40, 51 and 60 
yards were far off and no 
good. 

NSU got their deepest 
penetration of the game in the 
third quarter when a Mark 
Rhodes pass was complete to 
Pat Collins at the Tech 42. 
Another pass from Rhodes to 
Mike Almond put the ball at 
the Tech 20 but four in- 
complete passes in a row 
stopped the Demon scoring 
threat. 

The Demons' scoring drive 
half minutes left in the game 
after Tech punter Jerry Pope 
shanked one for six yards. 



With freshman quarterback 
Kenny Philibert in the game, 
the Demons drove 43 yards to 
put their only points on the 
board. 

Sidney Thornton, who was 
used extensively during the 
game when NSU had the ball, 
rushed 19 times for 125 yards 
and made the Demon score on 
an 18 yard run. 

Nobody expected the game 
to turn out this way. But 
giving up the ball three times 
within 40 yards of the goal line 
to such an offensive attack 
like Tech has, nothing else 
could be expected. 

Another important factor of 
the game was, as Coach A.L. 
Williams said after the game, 
"Our defense was just run 
down and they came out like 
we expected—passing... that's 
where they killed us." 

The Demons will attempt to 
bounce back from this defeat 
to face the Indians of Nor- 
theast Louisiana in Monroe 
this coming weekend. Kickoff 
is set for 2:30 p.m. Saturday 
afternoon. 





BALLARD UNDER PRESSURE -- Demon 
quarterback Butch Ballard, seeing action for the 
first time in several games, got plenty to think 
about last Saturday night against La. Tech. 
Ballard was far more the most effective passer 



vs NLU 
Dvs MISS 
L vs ME IV 
ivs UT-A 
I vs N. 1 
" ileese vs \ 
H vs LTV 
[vs MISS 
UK vs TE 
US vs TE 

for the Demons, hitting 4 of 6 for 63 yards. JVE vs CI 
wasn't nearly enough, because Tech scored t N vs cm 
points in the second quarter and defeated NSU 35 1, vs ATL 
6. 



Fed up with 

"Carter - Ford"? 

you have a 
CHOICE! 



Vote for JOBS, LOWER PRICES 
PEACE, EQUALITY 
. . . an end to RACISM! 



Don't sit out 
this 

election! 





vs ST. L 
IAS vs W 

***** 

die 



Mwestei 
lity's Chi 
ilor front 
duff with n 
n In the 
W the fir 
thomas 
i Tour nan 
rColiseun 



i won th 
ladies' i 
ll-«, 11- 
iSnowden 
sals. She 
leve Chr 

Ha to post 
te mixed 
S>with NJ 
<ona Mar 
dace in 
ladies doi 



NS 



HEAD COACH A. L. WILLIAMS 



Demon netters continue win streak 



rf 



hall;* 




The Vote 
they can't ignore 
in Washington 
and Wall Street 



HALL-TYNER CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE • 156 FIFTH AVENUE • NEW YORK, N.Y. 10010 



The Northwestern State 
University Demon netters 
continue their red-hot streak 
and brought their season 
record to 4-0, prior to their 
match with Stephen F. Austin 
last Thursday. 

It was the Demons second 
win of the season over the 
team from McNeese State 
University and it was another 
9-0 shutout. 

Ricardo Acuna led the way 
for NSU in the win over Mc- 
Neese with a 6-1, 6-2 win over 
Gustavo Rivera in the No. 1 
singles. He later teamed with 
Jose DeCamino for a 6-2, 6-4 
win over Rivera and Arthur 
Heygate in the No. 1 doubles 
match. 

DeCamino also won his No. 3 
singles match by 6-0, 6-0 
scores over Reddy Gustine. 

Other singles winners for 
the Demons included No. 2 
Gregg Manning 6-1, 6-1 over 
Estaban Ventura; No. 4 Luis 
Varela over Heygate, 7-5, 6-4; 
No. 5 Juan Lopez, 6-1, 6-2 over 
Paul Shepherd; and No. 6 
Steve Fricker over Huge 
Fischer by 6-2, 6-0. 



In the other doubles mat- 
ches, Manning and Fricker 
teamed for a 6-4, 6-7, 6-3 win 
over Shepherd and Ventura in 

the No. 2 doubles and Varela 
and Lopez paired up to take a 
7-6, 6-4 victory over Fischer 
and Gustine in the No. 3 event. 

The Demon tennis team 
compiled a 24-1 dual match 
record in the 1976 spring 
season and now has won 27 
dual matches in a row. 

In their first match of the 
season, the Demon women's 
tennis team defeated the team 
from Louisiana Tech 
University by the score of 9-1. 
The lone match loss was in 
singles competition. 

Vivianne Zahri, a freshman 
from Santiago, Chile, led the 
Lady Demons to this im- 
pressive victory over the team 
from Tech. 

Zahri downed Anita Burns 6- 
3, 6-2 in the No. 1 singles event 
and teamed with Babetta 
Cramer, freshman from 
Ardmore, Okla., to post a 6-2, 
6-2 win over Burns and Dawn 
Belgado in the No. 1 doubles 



match. Cramer also took a 6-0, 
6-3 victory over Delgado in the 
No. 2 singles. 

Other singles victories for 
Coach Larry Lambert's Lady 
netters included Fran Wise, 
freshman from Minden, who 
took a 6-3, 6-2 win from Susan 
Herring; Peggy Gilham, who 
downed Connie Coker 6-3, 6-2; 
Peggi Ates, who defeated Liz 
Bailey 6-3, 6-0; and Jan Daiy, 
who took a 6-3, 6-2 win over 
Melanie Calahan. 

The lone singles loss came 
in the No. 3 singles when Janie 
Wallace fell to Gail Dowell 6-fl, 
6-4. 

In the other two doubles 
matches, Wallace and Ates 
teamed for a 6-0, 6-3 win over 
Herring and Coker, and Wise 
and Daiy downed Dowell and 
Calahan 6-3, 6-0. 

Daiy, Ates, Wallace, and 
Gilham are returnees from 
last year's squad that com- 
piled a 3-9 overall record in 
match play. The Tech team 
handed them three of those 



"It was great to beat tl 
after they beat us those " 
last year," Lambert * 
"They came down here 
pecting to win again, bj*. 
played really good ted* 

The Lady netters see ' 
next action Nov. 5-6 in 
Northeast quadrangular tt 
with Tulane, Southern & 
and host Northeast Loufe" 

The remainder of the 
western State tennis *j 
schedule for the fall sen** 
shows that on October 
the Demons netters will V 
Lafayette for the USL ' 
Intercollegiate Tourna * 



< O 



On November 20-21 
netters will go to Shre' 
for the Pierremont OaW 
door Tournament. This A| 
the end of the fall scheflj 
but the netters will pic* * 
full schedule in the spr"* 
1977. 

If the Demons can coi& 
at this blazing pace, they 
be able to better the 24-1 
match record they post*" 
the 1976 spring campaign 



i<;Vball 
Tubers 
*stern 



/ 



October 26, 1976 CURRENT SAUCE Page 7 



Demon roundball practice is off icially opened 

L first NCAA Division I "We've tmmt nlmina a ut «« . ., — . » — ^ _i , — » ■ ■ , , ._i » 



ietball team in Nor- 
stern State University 
f reported to head coach 
Hilde brand Friday as 
J Demons officially open 
lice for the 1976-77 season. 

the dynamic 
(brand, opening his 12th 
i as the roundball boss 
onto the upcoming 
I with a guarded ray of 



^^**^4 HHHHH h^4<mj^ j jfiffty J)@jjioji§ bounce back 

* 




"We've been playing a lot of 
major college teams each 
year anyway," Hildebrand 
said, "but this is the first time 
we've had this many on our 
schedule. It's the best 
schedule we've played, but I 
believe our players can meet 
the challenge of playing 
against better people." 

The Demons, coming off a 
14-10 season which was the 
final campaign in Division II, 



were granted Division I status 
during the summer. It's ap- 
parent in the schedule, since 
20 games on the 26-game slate 
come against major-college 
competition. 

Northwestern will stress 
basic fundamentals and work 
on both offense and defense in 
preparing for the Nov. 30 
opener at home against 
always powerful McNeese 
State. 



The schedule also includes 
home-and-home meetings 
with Lamar University, 
Centenary, Louisiana Tech, 
Texas-Arlington, Northeast 
La., Louisiana College, 
Arkansas State, Georgia 
State, South Alabama and 
Houston Baptist, and single 
games with Nicholls State, 
North Texas State, Southern 
Mississippi and Southeastern 
La. 



Hildebrand and assistant 
coach Dr. Derwood Duke will 
welcome back a group of nine 
returning lettermen and four 
starters, including one of the 
best all-around players in the 
school's history in 6-foot-6 
forward Billy Reynolds. 

Reynolds averaged 20.8 
points and 12.8 rebounds a 
game as a junior and he'll 
have a good chance to become 
the Demons' all-time scoring 



leader during this season. 
"Billy could be as good as any 
forward we'll face this 
season," Hildebrand said. 
"We're looking for a super 
season from him." 

Other returning starters for 
Northwestern include 6-foot-3 
senior guard Dan Bell, 5-foot-9 
junior guard Lester Davis and 
6-foot-6 junior forward Lester 
Elie. They were the team's 
second, third and fourth 



leading scorers in the 1975-76 
season respectively. 

Newcomers which should 
help the squad include 
Frederick Piper, Robert 
Lively and Ed Touhy. Piper, a 
6-foot-7 standout from 
Alexandria's Peabody High 
School, was the Outstanding 
Player in Class AAA last 
season and should be counted 
upon heavily for help inside. 



Lively, also 6-foot-7, is from 
Port Allen and Touhy, a 6-foot- 
2 guard, is from Newman of 
New Orleans. 

"Our kids have been in- 
volved in conditioning drills 
for the past few weeks," 
Hildebrand said, "and we 
think our players will report in 
exceptional physical con- 
dition." 



Pigskin Predictions 






Ivs NLU 
Jvs MISS 

:Lvs MEMPHIS ST. 
1 ,vs UT-A 
^ H vs N. TEX. ST. 
4 feese vs W. TEX. ST. 
H vs LIVINGSTON 
ivs MISS COLLEGE 
*M vs TEX. SOUTH. 
[AS vs TEXAS TECH 
63 yards. I VE vs CTNCI 
ch scored 2 N vs CHICAGO 
jated NSU Sf vs ATLANTA 
vs ST. LOUIS 
LAS vs WASH 



vaimas Zl-10 DALLAS 28-21 I 

mens walks away with honors 



BOSSIER 

NSU 17-14 
LSU 28-27 
MSU 35-7 
UT-A 35-28 
NTSU 24-20 
MSU 31-17 
LIVING. 14-13 
SLU 28-24 
GRAM 35-20 
TEX. TECH 14-10 
CINCI 27-21 
MINN 17-10 
N. O. 21-20 
ST. LOUIS 27-24 
DALLAS 42-17 



RYDER 

NSU 28-24 
MISS 21-10 
MSU 14-7 
UT-A 28-14 
TECH 14-13 
MSU 13-3 
LIVING. 24-17 
SLU 7-6 
GRAM 38-27 
TEX. TECH 20-17 
CTNCI 33-24 
MINN 24-21 
ATLANTA 14-10 
S. F. 28-24 
DALLAS 21-10 



HAA6 

NSU 21-10 
MISS 25-15 
TUL 17-14 
UT-A 30-15 
NTSU 27-20 
MSU 21-14 
LIVING 14-7 
MISS COL 21-10 
GRAM 21-7 
TEXAS 17-14 
CINCI 21-10 
CHICAGO 14-7 
ATLANTA 28-7 
ST. LOUIS 21-7 
DALLAS 21-14 




CHRISTMAS 

NSU 20-17 
MISS 27-21 
MSU 17-7 
UT-A 30-20 
NTSU 26-14 
WTSU 19-14 
LIVING 14-13 
SLU 27-6 
GRAM 21-7 
TEX. Tech 21-14 
CLEVE 30-21 
MINN 27-14 
N. O. 24-14 
ST. LOUIS 30-24 
DALLAS 28-21 



t 

* 

* 
* 
* 

* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 

* 

* 
* 

1 

* 
* 

* 



Hoping for much im 
provement over their last out- 
of-state trip, Northwestern 
State University's Lady 
Demon volleyball team treks 
to Memphis, Tenn., this past 
weekend to take part in the 
huge Memphis State In- 
vitational Tournament. 

Teams from a six-state area 
will be taking part in the meet, 
acclaimed as one of the top 
events in the South. 

The Lady Demons didn't 
have much luck in their last 
out-of-state venture, losing 
four straight matches in the 
Houston Invitational Tour- 



teams. The other two setbacks 
on their 6-6 record came at the 
hands of Nicholls State and 
LSU in their last outing. 

NSU already has two wins 
each over Northeast La., La. 
Tech and Southwestern La. 
The NSU girls hold a 6-2 
record against teams in the 
state. 

In their last action against 
USL, the Lady Demons took a 
surprisingly easy 15-8, 15-12 
over the Cajuns in a match 
played on the NSU campus. 

Jill Hyatt, sophomore from 
Baton Rouge, was the student 
with 11 points scored on 16 



nament to powerful Texas serves. Senior Pam Morre 



from Killeen, Texas added 
nine spikes for winners during 
the match. 

The Lady Demons took it on 
the chin from the Lady Tigers 
of LSU in Baton Rouge last 
Monday. LSU took a 15-8, 14- 
16, 15-4 win in the latest Lady 
Demon competition. Fresh- 
man Mary Sonnier was the 
high point for Northwestern 
with 12 points scored, and 
senior Pam Moore accounted 
for nine other points on spikes 
North western's own in- 
vitational tournament is 
scheduled for the following 
weekend, Oct. 29-30, with eight 
teams scheduled to take part. 



tlwestern State 
nlty's Christy Callens, 
lior from Pineville, 
ioff with most of the top 
* In the collegiate 
it the first Charles F. 
rhomas Open Bad- 
Tournament held in 
'Coliseum on the NSU 



i won the collegiate 
ladies' singles title 
11-8, 11-6 win over 
iSnowden of La. Tech 
lals. She also teamed 
teve Christensen of 

Ha to post a win in the 
I te mixed doubles and 
*with NSU graduate 
Mona Martin to take a 
Place in the open 
ladles doubles. 



Callens and Christensen 
defeated Richard Martinell 

and Linda Vitter, both of 
Memphis State, 17-14, 15-12 in 
the mixed final. Susan Dunlap 
and Pat Howell downed 
Callens and Martin 15-9, 6-15, 
154 in the open doubles final. 

Callens was chosen Most 
Improved Player in the ladies 
collegiate division, and 
Christensen won the same 
award in the men's division. 
The tournament's two top 
awards, the "Red" Thomas 
Cup and the Jack Fisher 
Outstanding Player Award, 
both went to Ted Edgerton of 
Dallas, Tex., who captured the 
open singles title. 

Tournament director Don 
Ryan of the NSU mathematics 
department also figured 



singles final when Carmody 
took a 3-15, 17-16, 15-2 win, and 
Ryan also teamed with Martin 
to reach the finals of the open 
mixed doubles before losing to 
Bob Lutan and Pat Howell 15- 
8, 15-12. 

Lutan, representing Texas- 
Arlington, also won the men's 
collegiate singles crown by 
downing Christensen 15-6, 10- 
15 , 15-10 in the finals. He also 
teamed with Roger Hamell of 

the University of Texas for a 
15-6, 15-8 win over Martinell 
and Robert Womble of 
Memphis State in the doubles 
final. 

prominently in the results. He 
finished second to Tom 
Carmody in the veterans' 



Edgerton defeated 
Christensen 15-4, 15-12 in the 
open singles final, but Car- 
mody and Charles Holbrook 
paired for a 14-17, 154, 17-15 
win over Edgerton and Harold 

Clark in the open doubles final 
in one of the best matches of 
the day-long tournemant. 

in other results, Martha 
Coleman and Linda Lynn of 
La. Tech teamed for a 154, 15- 

9 ladies collegiate doubles title 
over Marihelen Sager and 
Pam Piazza of Delta State and 

uarolyn Spears topped Pat 
Howell 11-5, 7-11, 11-4 for the 
ladies open singles crown. 



vr 



Intramural flag football 
continues with playoffs being 
held this week. Today, the. 
losers of yesterday's games 
between independent league 
champion Couyon 8 and 
fraternity league runner-up 
Kappa Alpha and independent 
runner-up the Steelers and 
fraternity champion Kappa 
Sigma. 

The winners of these two 
games will play the NSU flag 
football championship game 
Wednesday night at 7:30 in 
Turpin Stadium and the 
winner will advance to the 
state playoffs in Baton Rouge 
on the LSU campus. 



NSU presents Lady Volleyball team 



eak 



t 



p-eat to beat tt 
beat us those 
" Lambert * 
»e down here 
win again, but 
illy good ten" 1 

Y netters see • 
i Nov. 5-6 in 
uadr angular H> 
s, Southern St» 
>rtheast Louis" 
InderoftheN^ 
late tennis * 
r the fall sen* 
on October ' 
i netters will " 
or the USL ' 
ate Tournai"* 

:mber 20-21. 
[ go to ShrevelJ | 
rremont Oa# 
iment. Tills 
the fall sch 
ters will pick 
le in the spri» 

4 




nons can coi 
ng pace, they 
etter the 24-1 
rd they post*" 
ing campaW 1 ' 





Harriers run past Gents 



$Vball team 

ers of the 
sstern State 



" ty ii ! ! 7 £& r ) Dora y Schofield, graduate assistant, Gail 
women s volleyba 1 Cheryl Dore, Debbie Brown, Pam Moore, 
team are (front row. 1. Jenkins, Jan Nichols, Jonan Courtney, Jill 



Hyatt, Shelia Creduer, 
Mary Sonnier, Gwen 
Teekell, Carolyn Quave. 
and Tammy Pruitt. 



In their first dual meet as a 
team, the Northwestern State 
University cross country team 
defeated the team from 
Centenary 23-32. 

The meet took place on the 
four mile Hickory Ridge 
course just north of the NSU 
campus. 

Sean O'Doraiell, a transfer 
student from Ireland, clocked 
20:30 over the course to take 
individual first place honors. 

Homer Clark of Leesville 
was third in 20:58 and Windell 
Bonner of Minden finished 
fourth in 21:23 for the Demon 
runners. 

Other NSU finishers were 
Glenn Corteila of Alexandria 
in 22:42 and Shaun 
McLaughlin, also from 
Ireland, in 23:33 for seventh 
and eighth respectively. 

Centenary's top finisher was 
Ron Casillias, who came in s- 
econd with a 20:47. Ron Ewar 
grabbed fifth individually with 
21:42. 



The Demon harriers will match against Northeast La. 
compete in another dual Friday, October 22 



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Page 8 CURRENT SAUCE October 26, 1976 



Lecture series planned 



NSU is accepting ap- 
plications from outstanding 
high school students who 
desire to participate this 
spring in the university's 
second annual President's Le- 
cture Series. 

The special lecture series 
runs from Jan. 15 to April 2 
and is conducted on con- 
secutive Saturdays from 8 
a.m. until 1 p.m. on the 
university campus. 

Students of high academic 
achievement who are enrolled 
in grades 9 through 12 are 
eligible to participate in the 
program, which is being 
coordinated by mathematics 
professor Dr. Donald E. Ryan. 

The 12-week program— 
which is designed to stimulate 
and aid the interests of the 
students— will consist of art 
and academic sections, with 
each section offering self- 
contained lectures by Nor- 
thwestern faculty members. 



Students who choose to 
enroll for Saturday classes in 
the art section will receive one 
hour of art history, two hours 
of oils, watercolors and 
charcoal and two hours in 
macreme, pottery and jewelry 
making. 

Subjects to be covered in the 
academic section are physics, 
archeology, geology and the 
philosophy behind yoga. 

Department of Art faculty 
members who will serve as 
instructors for the art section 
are Rivers C. Murphy and 
Robert T. Rector. 

Academic section in- 
structors will be Dr. Robert P. 
Roger, associate professor of 
physics; Barnard F. Snowden, 
associate professor of 
philosophy; Dr. Hiram F. 
Gregory, associate professor 
of anthropology, and Dr. 
David A. Dobbins, associate 
professor of geology. 

High school students who 
enroll in the academic section 



will participate in field trips to 
a planetarium and to arch- 
eological and geological sites 
in the area. 

Applications to participate 
in the series are available fr- 
om Ryan in the Department of 
Mathematics at Northwestern 
or from high school coun- 
selors. 

A high school transcript and 
letter of recommendation mu- 
st accompany the students' 
applications, which must be 
received no later than Dec. 20. 

Ryan stated that only 20 
students will be chosen to 
participate in the art section 
and that 35 students will be 
enrolled in the academic 
program. 

The announcement of 
students chosen to participate 
in the series will be made on 
Jan. 5. The President's 
Lecture Series is offered only 
in the spring semester at 
Northwestern. 




ARGUS ON SALE — Editor Vickie Tucker 
proudly displays the first issue of the Argus. The 
primary issue of the magazine went on sale Oc- 
tober 18. 

Argus premiers 



Staff members announced 



NSU president Dr. Arnold 
R. Kilpa trick has announced 
the appointment of 42 new 
faculty and staff members for 
the 1976-77 school year. 

The list of new ap- 
pointments includes two 
department chairmen, two 
professors, four associate 
professors, five assistant 
professors and 11 full-time 
instructors. 

Northwestern's new 
department chairmen are Dr. 
Cecile C. Mielenz of the 
Department of Home 
Economics and Dr. Robert C. 
Lee of the Department of 
Testing. 

New professors are Dr. Billy 
Joe Bryant in the Department 
of Art and Dr. Mielenz in home 
economics. 

Appointed associate 
professors were Helen A. Bush 
in the master's degree nursing 
program; Dr. Raymond S. 
Edge, director of respiratory 
tehrapy for the Department of 
Chemistry and Physics; and 
Dr. Helen Ferguson, director 
of continuing education for 
NSU baccalaureate degree 
nursing program. 

The university's new 
assistant professors are Dr. 
Sandra MacKenzie in the 
Department of Agricultural 
and Geological Sciences, Dr. 
Charles Minder and Dr. 
Michael J. Jally in the 
Department of Behavioral 
Sciences, Stephen K. Carter in 
the Division of Continuing 
Education and Daniel R. 




MOVIE INFO. 352-5109 
TUESDAY DOLLAR 
NIGHT 




STARTS TOMORROW 



JAMES 

MICHAEL CAAN ELUOTI 
CAKE MANE 60010 

mam 

An elegant sale-cracker, 
two would-be cos men and 
a dedicated do-gooder, is 
a race to rob the toughest 
safe n the world. 



Keyser in the Department of 
Speech and Journalism. 

Named as full-time in- 
structors were Mrs. Cecile K. 
Hetzel in the Department of 
Agricultural and Geological 
Sciences, Larry A. Varnado in 
the Division of General 
Studies, Mary D. Besse, 
Peggy R. Grooms and Mrs. 
Barbara P. Reppond in the 
associate degree nursing 
program, Ann M. Dye, 
Pauline Johnson, Susan 
Mandeville, Karen Oliver and 
Cheryl Wheaton on the bac- 
calaureate degree nursing 
program. 

Dan R. McDonald was 
appointed director of sports 
information, and William H. 
Hochstetler was named 
director of intramurals and 
outdoor recreational swim- 
ming pool manager. 

Temporary appointments 
include Raymond Arthur, 
part-time instructor of 
business administration and 
economics; Arthur M Palmer, 
assistant professor of business 
administration and 
economics; Stanley G. 
Williamson, part-time in- 



structor of business ad- 
ministration and economics; 
Christine Ann March, 
assistant professor of home 
economics; Kenneth Dooley, 
assistant professor of music; 
James Walter Jones, in- 
strictor of speech and jour- 
nalism; Maurice Willis, in- 
structor of nursing; Patricia 
Ritchie, instructor of nursing, 
Gladys Fife, instructor of 
nursing; Delores Tash, part- 
time instructor of nursing; 
Juanita Strickland, instructor 
of nursing; and Shirley 
Lucius, educational con- 
sultant in special education. 

Others receiving faculty and 
staff appointments at NSU 
were Robert D. Hornman, 
coordinator of education for 
the College of Nursing; Frank 
Lovell, part-time coordinator 
and counselor in continuing 
education; Euilee Aiken, 
student resident house 
director; Bessie Badgley, 
student resident house 
director; Ronald C. Jones, 
computer programmer, and 
Dr. Ethel W. Hetrick, 
psychologist-diagnostician for 
special education. 



Something new will soon be 
appearing on the NSU cam- 
pus. Argus, Northwestern's 
first multi-media magazine, 
goes on sale Monday, October 
18 in the Student Union lobby 
on the second floor. 

Argus is the product of the 
combined effort of students in 
both the Department of 
Languages and the Depart- 
ment of Art. It includes 
samples of poetry, essays, 
short stories, art work, and 
photography by students and 
faculty members. The price 
per copy will be $1.00. 

The staff of Argus will soon 
be accepting applications for 
new staff members for the 
Spring, 1977 issue of the 
magazine. "Some experience 



Allen reviews film 



Robert Allen, assistant 
professor of library science 
and chairman of the media 
division, has published two 
reviews in the current issue of 
"Fim News," an internation- 
al publication which reviews 
audio-visual materials and 
equipment. 

Allen's reviews are on 
filmstrip which concern the 
subject of encyclopedias. The 
filmstrips were reviewed for 
the Library Filmstrip Center 
in Wichita, Kansas. 

One of Allen's reviews 
discusses the basic knowledge 
and use of the major en- 
cyclopedias. He also com- 
ments in the publication on the 
arrangement of subject 
matter and the unique fea- 
tures of each encyclopedia. 

Allen's other review 
examines useage techniques 





of the encyclopedia. The 
filmstrip offered an excellent 
presentation on how to employ 
the encyclopedia as a 
research tool. He also states 
that the foundations of written 
reports may be formed by 
utilizing the encyclopedia to 
the best advantage. 

Allen joined the NSU staff in 
1972 and formerly served as 
chairman of the department of 
library science at Louisiana 
College in Pineville. He has a 
master's degree from Mc- 
Neese State University in 
education technology. 

The NSU media division 
chairman has published three 
reviews of filmwtrips for 
"Film News." His first 
review, which concerned a 
reader's guide to periodical 
literature, appeared last 
spring. 



PUT YOUR HAT 
WHERE YOUR HEAD 
IS ... Get out and get into 
supporting the NSU 
team whether they win 
or lose. They need your 
active support. 



When you think 
of mens wear.... 
think of 

V 



Located next to Broadmoor Shopping Center 



or knowledge of literary or art 
criticism is a pref ered quality 
in applicants, but interests, 
dedications, and a willingness 
to work and learn may be 
substituted for experience," 
stated Victoria Tucker, editor 
of Argus. 

Entry forms for con- 
tributions to the Spring issue 
of Argus will be available in 
the offices of the Departments 
of Language and Art or at the 
booth in the Student Union. 

Students who made con- 
tributions to the Fall 1976 issue 
of Argus may pick up their 
contributions in Dr. 
Pickering's office, Rm. 316 F 
in the Department of 
Languages. 



Family service offered 



NSU community and family 
services program is now being 
offered to communities and 
groups throughout North 
Central Louisiana. 

Developed by the Depart- 
ment of Behavioral Sciences 
at NSU, the free program 
provides educational sessions 
to community agencies in the 
areas of personal financial 
management, family 
relations, continuing 
education, adult education 
and general education 
problems as well as health 
care. 

Dr. Donald O. Gates, 
chairman of behavioral 
sciences at Northwestern, 
said specialized programs are 
available to community 
agencies in Vernon, Sabine, 
Natchitoches, Grant, Winn, 
DeSoto and River parishes. 

"Any community group can 
request one or more of the 
programs we are offering," 
said Gates. "If there is a need, 
and we can help with it, a 
telephone call is all that is 
required to have a 



professionally-trained staff 
assist individuals or co- 
mmunities with problems 
which they face." 

Gates added that if a 
community or group has a 
need that is not covered by the 
Northwestern program the 
Behavioral Sciences 
Department at NSU will at- 
tempt to develop programs to 
accommodate specific needs. 

To arrange for programs or 
acquire additional in- 
formation about the com- 
munity services project, in- 
terested persons should 
contact Gates or Dr. Robert 
Breckenridge in the Depart- 
ment of Behavioral Sciences 
at Northwestern. 

"The programs do not cost 
the communities or groups," 
Gates said. "This is a unique 
service we are providing, and 
we believe more communities 
and groups should be taking 
advantage of the opportunity 
to have a professional staff 
help alleviate some of the 
problems with which they 
have just confronted." 



Bonner show slated 



Jim Bonner of New Orleans 
will present a one-man show of 
commercial graphic designs 
and water colors Oct. 25-Nov. 
5 in the fine arts gallery of 
A.A. Fredericks Fine Arts 
Center. 

The show will be open to the 
public Monday thru Friday 
from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. 
There is no admission for 
persons to view the exhibit. 

Bonner is one of the leading 
graphic designers in New 
Orleans and has been active in 
design and marketing 
programs for many 
businesses and products in the 
New Orleans area. 

He has won many awards 
and acknowledgements of his 
achievements in the field of 
graphic design. These honors 
include awards from the 
annual shows of The Art 
Directors and Designers 

DISCOUNT 
PRINTING 



Association of New Orleans, 
the New York Creativity 
Annual Shows, the Art 
Directors Club of Tulsa and 
the 1976 Andy Awards. 

Bonner was a board 
member and past president of 
the New Orleans Art Directors 
and Designers Association, a 
charter member of the 
Louisiana Watercolor Society, 
associate member of the 
American Watercolor Society 
and holds membership in 
many civic organizations in 
New Orleans. 



Three Columns 



Bienvenu 

appointed 

to commission 

Dr. Millard J. Bienvenu , 
chairman of the Department 
of Sociology and Social Work 
has been appointed by the 
United States Catholic Conf- 
erence to serve on its National 
Commission on Marriage and 
Family Life. 

The commission was 
recently created to study the 
state of the family and develop 
recommendations for a 
comprehensive strategy of 
intervention on the part of the 
church at all levels to support 
and strengthen marriage and 
family life. 

Comprised of bishops, 
family life directors and lay 
authorities on family life, the 
commission will conduct its 
first meeting Nov. 30-Dec. 1 in 
Washington, D.C. 

"There appears to be a 
renewed focus on the in- 
stitution of marriage and 
family life in this country, and 
the commission is a prime 
example," said Bienvenu, 
predicting that education for 
marriage, parenthood and 
family life will become a 
national priority. 

"Marital breakdown, 
parent-child conflict, drug 
abuse and juvenile deliquency 
are usually symptoms of pro- 
blems in family life," he said. 
"The majority of people who 
marry are not emotionally 
ready nor adequately 
prepared for the responsibility 
of marriage and parenthood." 

An authority in the family 
life field, Bienvenu is the au- 
thor of numerous professional 
publications in the area of 
family and interpersonal 
communications. He is also 
director of the Northwestern 
Family Study Center, through 
which he has conducted ex- 
tensive research on drug 
abuse, sex education and 
family relationships. 

The Northwestern professor 
is a member of the So- 
uthwestern Region Board of 
the American Association of 
Sex Educators and Counselors 
and has served as chairman of 
the research committee of the 
Louisiana Task Force on Sex 
Education. He was the 
recipient of the Louisiana 
News Media Award for 1975 
forhis surveys and reporting 
on sex education. 



year in Furman University. 
Miss Lake's informal training 
was received in the constant 
correspondence she kept with 
relatives in Texas, South 
Carolina and other part of 
Louisiana, from which she 
gleaned knowledge of more 
practical subjects of the day. 

In 1878, she became one of 
the first teachers in the East 
Baton Rouge Parish public 
schools. Part of the article 
quotes Miss Lake's descrip- 
tion of her boat trip down the 
Red River from Shreveport to 
Port Hickey. 

The conflict discussed in the 
article was not resolved dur- 
ing Miss Lake's lifetime, and 
she ended her days semi- 
dependent on a male relative, 
having "lived 50 years from 
her unpacked trunk." 

Other articles authored by 
Mrs. Wells have appeared 
recently in such publications 
as "Joe's Bulletin," "The 
River Counties," and "early 
American Life." 



"Were it left to me to decide 
whether we should have 
government without 
newspapers or newspapers 
without government, I should 
not hesitate for a moment to 
prefer the latter." 

- Thomas Jefferson 



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Wells authors 
article 

Carol Wells, assistant 
librarian in the Cammie G. 
Henry Room of Watson 
Library, is the author of an 
article which appears in the 
current issue of "Louisiana 
History." 

The article, entitled "Kind 
and Gentle Adminitions: The 
Education of a Louisiana 
Teacher," concerns the 
conflict between education 
and the conditions that society 
imposed upon educated 
women during the mid-19th 
century. 

Mrs. Wells, who is the 
author of numerous articles, 
chose Miss Hattie Lake to 
illustrate the conflict between 
college education, society's 
expectations of women and 
the actual life of an educated 
woman. 

Miss Lake was schooled at 
home on her father's Caddo 
Parish plantation. In 1865, she 
attended Mansfield Female 
College and enrolled the nest 



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Nicholls State Univer, 
Southeastern Louijj, 
University and Southern i 
versity-Baton Rouge. 

The new chairman of 
Louisiana Special Educi 
Center Directors receive 
bachelor's degree 
Louisiana Tech Univtj, 
and earned his master's 
Ph.D. degrees from Loujj 
State University. 

He joined the Northw^ 
faculty after several yetg 
a teacher, coach and priaj 
in the public schools 
Louisiana. 

During the 1969-70 acaoi 
school year, Kinard direct 
survey of educational 
for the State of Louisiana 



Kinard elected 
chairman 

Dr. Curt R. Kinard, head of 
the Department of Shecial Ed- 
ucation has been elected to a 
one-year term as chairman of 
the Louisiana Special 
Education Center Directors. 

Kinard joined the Nor- 
thwestern faculty in 1968 and 
was appointed chairman of 
the special education d- 
epartment in 1971. He is a 
member of the Council for 
Exceptional Children, the 
Council for Administration of 
Special Education and The 
Association for Gifted. 

Northwestern is one of 11 
universities throughout the 
state which operate regional 
diagnostic evaluation centers 
to provide school systems in 
Louisiana with pupil appraisal 
services. 

According to Kinard, the 
diagnostic evaluation centers 
that are domiciled on 
university campuses serve 
particular areas of the state. 
Eight additional parish-based 
centers are located in 
metropolitan areas. 

Sixty-eight diagnostic 
evaluation teams are 
presently under contract to 
the State Department of 
Education to evaluate 400 
school children per team each 
year. Each evaluation team is 
composed of a social worker, 
psychologist, educational 
consultant and speech 
pathologist. 

"We evaluate children who 
are referred to us by the 
parish school systems we 
serve," said Kinard. "We see 
children who have learning 
and behavioral problems in 
school." 

Northwestern, which also 
operates branch centers in 
Alexandria and Winnfield, has 
five diagnostic evaluation 
teams serving school systems 
in DeSoto, Red River, Sabine, 
Winn, Natchitoches, LaSalle, 
Grant, Rapides and Avoyelles 
parishes. 

Kinard said the most 
common types of ex- 
ceptionalities encountered in 
evaluation processes are 
mentally retarded, learning 
disabled, speech impaired, 
gifted and talented, emo- 
tionally disturbed and 
physically handicapped. 

Universities which serve as 
the base for diagnostic 
evaluation centers, in addition 
to Northwestern, are Lo- 
uisiana State University- 
Shreveport, LSU-Baton 
Rouge, the University of New 
Orleans, Louisiana Tech- 
Grambling State University, 
Northeast Louisiana 
University, McNeese State 
University, the University of 
Southwestern Louisiana, 



In an in 
Hook last 
ft| only five 
Current Sa 
about the i 
When a 
Hook" ori| 
pointed at 
right eye i 
was it." A 
looked tou| 
Hook. 
Many lis 
the group 
(heir style ( 
disagree 
recorded t 
"Sylvia's N 
was our fii 
that we ha 
it's just ti 
were pickir 

Dr. Hoyt J. Reed haslJ^ RoUil1 
elected president of the nti " N ° w 
created Louisiana Associti ^ xteen " 
of Continuing Hi^* ,iri B ' 
Education. 
Reed is director of 



UNWANTED hair from The 
•rms, legs & f ace 
REMOVED.. .quickly and 
permanently by a Registered 
Electrologist. "6. j« 
Johnson, 1013 Parkway Drive, 
Phone 3S2-m3. By ap. 
polntmant only I 



Reed elected 

association 

president 



tinuing education at H TC didn ' t fc 




Vol. L 



What 



bea 
one directi 
When \ 



were banki 
somebody 
They (the | 
stuff and n 
and we've i 
it doesn't i 
"When yc 
your persoi 
given when 
were as " 
were on. T 
characters 
get them t 
Dr. Hook 
Europe in 
veil they hi 



N 



England ar 
list time w 



T 



th western, which is one oi 
Louisiana colleges 
universities with chatj 3 
member status In 
association. 

"Continuing Education 
the fastest-growing sego 
of higher education in 
United States," Reed 
"For this reason, this i 
organization is designed 
make the entire acadar 
community aware of l 
importance and potential 
continuing education. El 
charter member school i " 
cooperate with governmeJ over ' """^ 
bodies and other groups i 
organizations in advand 
the goals of continuing Mji 
education." 

The association's first stf| 
president came to 
th western in 1967 as 
assistant professor 
secondary education 
assistant director of the sd 
plant planning laboratory, 
was appointed contind 
education director in 1978. 

Reed previously served i 
year as superintendent 
schools in Natchito* 
Parish, two years as sfl 
visor of school plants for 
State Department 
Education, 10 years as Ml 
aville High School princ 
and seven years as a te» 
and coach at Pleasant 
High School. 

He received a BJS.degrt 

physical education 
Northwestern in 1950 
earned his M.Ed, degree 
education administration I J 
supervision from StepW 
Austin State University 
1953. He was awarded 
Ed.D. degree in educatioajj 
ministration from 
State University in 1970. 

Reed is a member of 
Louisiana Tead"^ 
Association, Phi Delta W 
Association of UnivefJJ 
Evening Colleges, 
Education Associate 
America and Lions CH" c 
ternational. He appears Uomecomi 
1975-76 edition of n 
sonalities of the South." 

Other officers elected « , 
Dr. Wade Ledet, NicWj 
ate University, pre*'' Nq 
elect; Dr. Raymond^ ^ 
Delgado College, se cr«9T ,clat101 
treasurer; Richard 
Tulane University, 
at-large and Dr. R*5™ 
Floyd, Southern Univ* 1 



Ho 

NSU's ai 
tion has be* 
exhibits, t 
' Mc Ki tertainmen 
theme of " 
Homeco 
University' 
nation's B 
flighting 
v yu 'ootball ga 
University 
*t 7:30 p.r 
Schedul 
fomecomi 
bunion of 
f ootballtes 




id 



Baton Rouge, dlrec' 
large. 

Charter members * 
association are Cent** 
College, Delgado CollegJ 
Mary's Dominican Ofl 
Louisiana College, LS 1 ^ fl 
Rouge, LSU-ShreveP 
McNeese State Univ<* 
Nicholls State Univ^ 
Northwestern, Soutl** elected to 
Louisiana Univef' b.) Mi 
Southern University-B^ »v e rag e 

c.)Mus 



eW, ni^ 



The Stt 
•s presen 
'tudent v, 
the treasi 

Accordi 
the candii 
re quirem 

a.) A rr 

m end 



Tulane University, U' 
of New Orleans I 
University of Sou* 
Louisiana. 



Sal 



ins 



CURRENT SAUCE 

Vol. LXIV, No. 10 NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY NATCHITOCHES. LOUISIANA November 9, 1976 



NATCHITOCHES. LOUISIANA 



What medicine show? 



State Univer t 
tern Louisj, 
and Southern | 
on Rouge. 
' chairman n 
Special Educi 
ectors receive 
3 degree 
Tech Unive t| 
i his master's 
ees from Louyj 
ersity 
d the Norths 



er several yea, ^ eye mA said> . lthat patch) ^ 



:oach and print 
ublic school) 



tie 1969-70 acadi 
r, Kinard direct 
educational 
te of Louisiana 

jlected 
ation 
ent 

J. Reed has In 
sident of the net 
uisiana Assotiai 
inuing 

director of 
iucation at N 
which is one oi 

colleges 
es with char 

status in 



Hook baits crowd 



by Muffett Richardson 

In an interview with the group Dr. 
Hook last Wednesday afternoon and 
only five hours before the concert, 
Current Sauce found them enthusiastic 
about the evening ahead. 

When asked how the name "Dr. 
Hook" originiated one band member 
pointed at the black patch covering his 



was it." And the way he pointed, he 
looked tough enough to be the pirate, 
Hook. 

Many listeners of Dr. Hook feel that 
the group is becoming more serious in 
their style of music. Dr. Hook members 
disagree saying, "We've always 
recorded that kind of song (serious) 
"Sylvia's Mother" was serious and that 
was our first record. On every album 
that we had there were serious songs, 
it's just turned out that then people 
were picking those songs like "Cover of 
the Rolling Stone" and "Freaker's 
Ball." Now there is a demand for "Only 
jSxteen." It's more or less the public's 
HjgJdoing, because we're not going in any 
one direction." 

"When we released "Only Sixteen" 
we didn't know that would be a hit. We 
were bankrupt. We just released that so 
somebody would send us a sandwich. 
They (the public) used to like the crazy 
stuff and now they like the pretty stuff 
and we've always been pretty crazy, so 
ing Education " doesn't make any difference to us." 
t-growing segn "When you'r on stage you exaggerate 
education in I ^ personality," This was the answer 
jtes " Reed a ^ ven w * ien ^ ** 0( * was if they 
reason, this i ffere 33 "strange" off stage as they 
is designed ffere on- added > 1,1 think we are 
characters. We're trying very had to 
get them to make a cartoon of us." 

Dr. Hook is hoping for a return trip to 
Europe in the near future to see how 



ago) we sold out the Civic Auditorium. 
That was close to 6,000 tickets." 

Living through bankruptcy was what 
considers one of the best things that 
ever happened to the group. For a year 
they could not even afford to go to 
another state to do a concert. But even 
the road crew stuck with the group. 
What pulled Dr. Hook out of bankruptcy 
was "Only Sixteen" which was 
recorded with the little bit of money the 
group scraped together. Capital Record 



they 



Company backed the group and 
finally got on the road again. 

"The fastest way to find out that your 
not a rock-n-roll star is to become one." 
When asked if they were nervous about 
the concert at NSU they said, "You're 
not nervous like scared, but you get a 
little thing. I mean like, just before you 
go on, you throw up." 

Needless to say, NSU received Dr. 
Hook and the opening group, Black 
Smoke, with open ears and both groups 
did better than expected. 




Consort set tonight 



Today a new experience in music has 
come to the Northwestern Campus. The 
Paul Winter Consort will offer an af- 
ternoon work shop and appear in 
concert this evening at 8 p. m. in the 
Fine Arts Auditorium. 

Paul Winter, the leader of the Con- 
sort, will conduct the workshop for the 
purpose of stressing that any com- 
bination of instruments can make 
music together, and that anyone can 
improvise, in consort with others, if 
they can play a simple scale. 

Winter, a saxophonist, leads the Paul 
Winter Consort, a five member musical 
unit. The Consort is famous for bringing 
the words of classical, ordered and 



modern free-form music together with 
tools like amplified instruments and 
improvisation backed up with solid 
musical training 

Other members of the group are 
cellist David Darling, Tigger Benford, 
Ben Carriel. Robert Chapell. 

The workshop is not going to be a 
demonstration but rather group par- 
ticipation. This is a participation 
workshop where people are invited to 
try their own instruments so what they 
experience is themselves. It is all 
directed at creating an alternative to a 
mass society of spectators. 



SEVENTH WONDER-Seventh Wonder, pictured above, is scheduled to play at 
the annual homecoming dance this week. The dance will be held Friday night in 
Prather Coliseum. This years homecoming queen will be announced during the 
dance. 

Programs studied , 
termination urged 



by Ken Landry 



n is designed 
entire acada 
y aware of 
> and potential 
education. 



other groups I 



ins 



anber school i reU **** nave done since their 11181 
rith governma over ' three month s earlier. "About a 



year ago we went to Manchester, 



advand ^land and sold only 36 tickets and the 
f"contmuinf Ma} * tkne we went baA (three months 



ciation's first 
came to 
in 1967 
professor 
education 
rector of the 
ting laboratory 
inted continui 
lirector in 
viously served 
superintendent 
in Natchitoc 
suf 



JThe NSU Homecoming Court ! 

esct) ^ J 



for 



years as 
hool plants 
Department 
10 years as 1 

1 School princ 
years as a te* 
i at Pleasant 
1. 

red a B.S. degr» 
education 
ern in 1950 
i M.Ed, degr* 
administrati* 
l from StepM 
ite UniversW 
was awarded 
ee in education 
>n from 
ersity in 1970 
a member o» 
ta Teac 
l, Phi Delta K» 
n of Univeri 

Colleges, 
i Association 
ind Lions Ch* 
I. He appears 1 ] 
iition of 
f the South." 
icers elected 
Ledet, Nicho* 
srsity, pre»J 

Raymond 
College, s 
; Richard 
iversity, oW 
nd Dr. 
uthern Uni ve 
iuge, direct* 

members °\ 
n are Cen^ 
■lgado CoHefl 
Miunican 
College, LSI*" 
L,SU-Shrev«P 
State Unive r 
State Univ«J 
srn, South^ 
a Univei 
niversity-B^jj 
hern-New 
iversity, 
Orleans 
of South** 




A team of professional educators has 
recommended to the State Board of 
Regents Academic Affairs Committee 
that the doctoral program in education 
at Northwestern be terminated. 

The team, consisting of educators 
from out of the state, was hired by the 
committee to study doctoral programs 
at several universities in Louisiana. 
When the team completed its study, it 
recommended that some 20 doctoral 
programs from the state be 
eliminated. 

At the request of regents from North 
Louisiana, the Board of Regents voted 
to maintain the higher degree 
programs , because of geographical 
location, at Northwestern and to have 
Louisiana State University and the 
University of New Orleans join in 
consortium with Northwestern. 

The committee recommended that 
the three universities be put on 
probation and given until next summer 



to develop a satisfactory program or be 
terminated. 

The research team, according to Dr. 
Thomas P. Southerland, dean of the 
Graduate School, "did not do an 
evaluation. They spent five hours at 
Northwestern. They visited five univ- 
ersities in five days. They did a 
review," he said. 

They criticized us for things that they 
shouldn't have, Dean Southerland said. 
In their report the research team said, 
"there is little evidence that the faculty 
knows what a doctoral program should 
be," he said. 

The team further criticized us by 
saying that our dissertations were not 
any good. But, according to 
Southerland, how would they know? All 
they did was to look at the titles. 

The report also said that doctoral 
students have to take courses being 
taught by professors who do not hold 



Trip set 



How would you like to go snow skiing 
in the town where Butch Cassidy 
robbed his first bank and where the 
main street dates back to the silver 
boom of 1880's? 

The town is Telluride, Colorado, 
surrounded by the San Juan mountains, 
some of the state's grandest scenery. 

The Student Union Governing Board 
is sponsoring a trip to this historically 
interesting ski site Jan. 2-9, 1977. (Snow 
is guaranteed.) The trip is open to 
students, faculty, staff, alumni and 
their dependents (six years of age and 
older.) 

Round trip transportation on Con- 
tinental Trailways, five nights of 
lodging at Telluride Lodge, and five 
days of skiing will cost each person 
$180. This includes the ski lift but does 
not include the rental of ski equipment, 
lessons and food. 

The condominiums at the Telluride 
Lodge are equipped with a kitchen so 
one need not eat out every meal. 

Reservations are being taken on a 
first come, first serve basis and should 
be made by sending $25 to the NSU 
Alumni Office immediately. 

Make plans to take part in the SUGB- 
sponsored Telluride Ski Trip and ex- 
perience the exhiliration one gets as he 
shoots down a mountain slope. 

For more information contact the 
NSU Alumni Office at 357-4414. 



doctoral degrees. Again, according to 
Southerland, this is not so. 

In sort of a compromise Nor- 
thwestern agreed to give up its doc- 
torate of philosophy program in health 
and physical education to keep its 
doctorate of education in that same 
field. 

Other universities to lose doctorate 
programs were: Louisiana State 
University, Baton Rouge, University of 
New Orleans, Louisiana Tech, Nor- 
theast Louisiana, University of South- 
western Louisiana, and McNeese. 






TANYA ALLEN 



LISA BREAZEALE 




BRENDA CAUSEY 



Homecoming is finally here 



HELEN CRUMP 




CAROL MARTIN 




WANDA PAYADUE 



NSU's annual Homecoming celebra- 
tion has been scheduled for Nov. 13 with 
exhibits, programs and special en- 
^j c H tertainment being planned around the 
•heme of "Proudly We Hail." 
Homecoming will focus on the 
university's 92-year history and the 
lation's Bicentennial observance. Hi- 
. flighting the activities will be the 
I io otball game between NSU and the 
University of Southwestern Louisiana 
* 7:30 p.m. 
„ Scheduled in conjunction with 
homecoming is the 10th anniversary 
bunion of the university's undefeated 
tootball team of 1966. The team had a 9- 
„ 11 record, won the Gulf States Con- 
j 'erence championship and was ranked 
1 in the nation by the National 
ociation of Intercollegiate Athletics. 
I ..jack Clayton, who coached the 1966 



4 



team, will speak during the Alumni 
Dinner at 5 p.m. in the Student Union 
Ballroom, and members of the un- 
defeated squad will be recognized at the 
banquet. Tribute will also be paid to the 
1966 team during halftime of the NSU- 
Southwestem football game. 

Another highlight of the halftime 
program will be the induction of three 
former NSU athletes into the univer- 
sity's Athletic Hall of Fame. This 
year's inductees will be Jim Willis, who 
gained fame in baseball; Don Guidry, 
formerquarterback and Jimmy Leach, 
a NSU basketball star of the 1950's. 

The Hall of Fame members will be 
honored at a reception in the N Club 
Room at Prather Coliseum at 4 p.m. 
following a 2:30 intrasquad scrimmage 
that will be staged by the basketball 
team. 



SUGB has opening 



The Student Union Governing Board 
is presently taking applications for any 
s tudent wishing to fill the vacancy in 
the treasurer's position. 

According to the SUGB constitution, 
the candidates must meet the following 
re quirements: 

a ) A minimum of 45 credit hours at 
f>e end of the semester that he is 
el ected to office; 
b.) Must possess an overall 2.0 
!e: 

c) Must be a business major with the 



ability to maintain necessary financial 
business records of the Governing 
board; 

d. ) May not be on scholastic or 
disciplinary probation; 

e. ) Must be a full-time student in good 
standing. 

Deadline for filing is Friday, Nov. 12 
at 4:30 p.m. Applications may be ob- 
tained in Room 214 of the Student 
Union. Election for the office will be 
held Monday, Nov. 15 druing the 
regular Union Board meeting. 



Activities officially begin Friday, 
Nov. 12 with a pep rally and dance , in 
Prather Coliseum. The pep rally starts 
at 7 p.m., and the dance— featuring 
music by the group Seventh Wonder of 
Alabama— starts at 8 o'clock. The 
dance is being sponsored by the Student 
Union Governing Board and the Demon 
Booster Club. 

During the dance, the nine members 
of the Homecoming Court will be 
presented, and the queen will be nam- 
ed. 

The cheerleaders have announced 
there will be a pep rally at 5 p. m. 
Thursday at the Bunker Club. After the 
pep rally, three kegs and ten cases of 
Australian beer will be served. Spon- 
soring the pep rally are Shamrock 
Discount Liquor, Rapides Grocery. 
Natchitoches Beverages, Mid-States 

Beer. 

Saturday's activities begin with 
registration and a reception at noon in 
the Student Union. There will be af- 
ternoon meetings of the NSU Alumni 
Association board of directors and the 
NSU Foundation board of directors. 

Open House is scheduled from 2 until 
4 p.m. in campus residence halls, 
academic departments, sorority and 
fraternity houses and other parts of the 
campus. 

Coordinating Homecoming activities 
are Dr. C.B. Ellis, and Debbie Hebert. 




NELL REED 





JARJA WELLS 



Contest planned 



No Christmas Lights Festival would 
be complete without the painted win- 
dows of the Student Union. 

For this reason, the Student Union 
Governing Board is once more spon- 
soring its annual Christmas Window 
Painting contest. 

Letters were sent out to each 
organization with a list of rules and an 
entry form. If any organization did not 
receive a letter they are advised to 
come by Room 214 of the Student Union 
and pick one up. 

Three awards will be give for the 
windows: First place— $50, Second 
place— $25, and Third Place— $15. The 
winners will be presented with their 
awards at the Christmas Lights Con- 
cert and their name will be engraved on 
a permanent plaque in the Union. 



The windows will remain on display 
through the holiday season. 

According to Debbie Bose, chairman, 
and John McKellar, co-chairman, 
windows will be chosen by a number 
drawing with each representative of 
each organization doing the honors on a 
first come, first serve basis. 

For more information, persons are 
advised to go by Room 214 of the 
Student Union or call 6511. 

Play opens 

The second major production of the 
NSU theatre season, "The Eye Alone," 
opens tomorrow at 7:30 p. m. in the St. 
Denis Cafeteria and runs through 
Saturday. 



The play, under the direction of Dr. 
E. Robert Black, is a collection of 
works by contemporary writers in- 
cluding NSU faculty and students. 

The student written selections were 
recently published in Argus, NSU's 
literary magazine. The magazine will 
be on sale before and after each per- 
formance in the lobby. Cost is $1. 

The cast includes students in the oral 
interpretation class, other NSU 
students, and three Speech and Jour- 
nalism faculty members. Faculty 
members performing are Ray 
Schexnider, Daniel Keyser, and Dr. 
Black. 

Students will be admitted with an ID. 
Faculty and staff tickets are 50 cents 
and may be purchased at the Little 
Theater box office from 1-5 p. m. 
Monday-Friday. The telephone number 
is 3574179. 




Page 2 CURRENT SAUCE November 9, 1976 



Co 's Corner 



The Dilemma 

Don't ever let Bill Bossier 
talk you into being a guest 
picker in Pigskin Predictions. 
There can be no other task 
quite as nerve racking. 

After agreeing to submit 
myself to such mental torture, 
I gathered a panel of "ex- 
perts" to tell me all about the 
teams. These "experts" were 
Bill Bossier and Rodney Wise. 

I would have had no trouble 
if they had put the Dallas 
Cowboy game on the list, but it 
is a Monday night game. 

Anyway, on with my story. 
A lot of held those two were! 
Actually, after picking their 
brains to get overall records 
for the season and learning a 
bit about offensive and 
defensive lines, I started 
choosing teams. That was the 
easiest part. 

The difficult part came 
when I had to decide on a 
score. What do I know about 
field goals, PATs, and the 
like? 

Bill and Rodney laughed till 
their sides hurt as I pulled my 
hair trying to find a score for 
each team that was not 
completely outrageous. The 
struggle was not over yet. 

I looked down the list of 
games and discovered that I 
had not made a choice for the 
LSU vs. Mississippi State 
game. 

Saturday is Mississippi 
State's homecoming and they 
presently have a 7-2 record for 
the season. To decide this 
choice Rodney and I flipped a 
coin saying, "Whoever get 
three out of five tosses will be 
the one I choose as the win- 
ner." 

We tossed the coin not five 
but nine times with every 
other time coming up in favor 
of Mississippi State. Bill, a 
tiger fan from way back when , 
was extremely disappointed 



when I disregarded his advice 
and chose Mississippi State. 

All I can do now is wait till 
Sunday morning and then 
make a mad scramble for the 
sports section to see how well I 
did. (I have a feeling those 
sure bet to win teams we chose 
will be upset and I will be the 
only picker in the history of 
the panel to have a 0-15 
record.) 

I was not the only member 
of this week's panel who had to 
consult an "expert." Bob 
Ryder, who has been having 
trouble with his predictions all 
season, decided to get the 
better of all of us. 

Consulting strange and 
mystic powers, Ryder took his 
list to the fortuneteller located 
on Highway 1 South to pick the 
winners. 

Bill Bossier doesn't feel that 
even mystic intervention is 
going to help Ryder in his 
present predicatment. 

But, then who knows? 
Stranger thing have been 
known to happen. Let us hope 
for Ryder's sake that he made 
the right choice in "experts." 

• • • • 

Proudly We Hail 

NSU will celebrate its 92nd 
Homecoming this Saturday as 
the Demons take on the Ragun 
Cajuns from USL, that 
university located down in the 
heart of Cajun land. 

A dance, pep rallies, display 
contest, receptions, open 
houses and many other events 
are being planned for this 
Saturday and this week. 

The Homecoming com- 
mittee, coordinated by Debbie 
Hebert, graduate assistant 
working in the office of Ex- 
ternal Affairs, invites every 
person to join in the festivities 
and make this homecoming 
one we can be proud of. Make 
plans to come to the game and 
cheer the Demons on to vic- 
tory. 



Current Sauce 



COLETTE OLDMIXON 
Editor 



BOB RYDER 
Managing Editor 



BILL BOSSIER 
Sports Editor 



PAULA JETTON 
News Editor 



OLU AKINRINADE 
Assistant News Editor 

MARK BANDY 
Business Manager 

RODNEY WISE 
Circulation Manager 



RONALD BUZZETTA 
Assistant News Editor 

MARK SMITH 
Advertising Manager 

CRAIG BERTHOLD 
Cartoonist 



MIKE RABALAIS FAIR HYAMS 

Photographers 

FRANKLIN PRESSON 
Adviser 

Reporters— Muff et Richardson, Marvin Horton, Bob Rash J 
Steve Parsons, Stan Tyler, Charlene Blume, and Ken Land 





FREEDOM 

OF THE PRESS 



Current Sauce is the official publication of the student body of 
Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, Louisiana. The 
newspaper is entered as second class matter at the Natchitoches Post 
Office under an act of March 3, 1879. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday during thefall and spring | 
semesters with the exception of holidays and testing periods and bi 
weekly during the summer semester. 1 1 is printed at the Natchitoches 
Times, Highway 1 South, Natchitoches, Louisiana. 

Editorial offices are located in Room 225, Arts and Sciences, 
Building and telephones are 357-5456 and 357 6874, Business. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are solely those of the 
student editors and do not necessarily represent the viewpoint of the 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body of Northwestern. 

Letters to the editor are invited and contributions are solicited from 
students, faculty, and staff and from student organizations. Letters 
must be signed and no more than 500 words to be considered for 
publication Names will be withheld upon request. 

The staff of Current Sauce reserves the right to edit all letters for 

Ke of journalistic style and available space. 



A note of gratitude to the 14 
organizations who have en- 
tered the Homecoming 
display contest. 



Meet the Staff 

The semester is almost over 
and I have not formally intro- 
duced the CURRENT SAUCE 
staff to our readership. Let me 
take this opportunity to do so. 

Bob Ryder is the managing 
editor of this publication. A 
Journalism public relations 
major, one could say that 
Ryder has a finger in just 
about every pie on campus. In 
other words, he is the chair- 
men of senate for the Student 
Governement Association. A 
hard worker, Ryder has only 
one major problem— he 
doesn't seem to know his 
football. 

Paula Jetton is our news 
editor. Paula is a Sociology 
major with a minor in Jour- 
nalism. She is witty, charming 
and very capable. Paula is 
graduating this sememster 
and we are going to miss her 
smiling face and capable 
assistance. We wish her the 
very best when she gets out 
into "the cold, cruel world." 

Moving down the power 
structure, we next encounter 
out our sports editor, BUI 
Bossier. Bill is a business 
major with no journalistic 
background. This fact did not 
handicap him in any way. He 
jumped right into the midst of 
lis job, learning layout, paste- 
up, picture cropping, and 
story composition with on-the- 
job efficiency. Bill and Ryder 
have a slight rivalry going 
with regards to Pigskin 
llllllllllllilillllllllliiiiiiilliiiilllllllliillllllllllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilllllllllllllllllllllllllliiiiliiil 

New technology enables newspapers to tailor their product 
to meet the informational needs of the individual com- 
munities and neighborhoods that make up a metropolitan 
region, and to cover the localized interests of suburban 
readers more thoroughly and more effectively. 



Predictions. Their 
little remarks to each other 
keep the office very lively at 
times. 

Our two assistant news 
editors are Olu Akinrinade 
and Ronnie Buzzetta. Olu is a 
Journalism news editorial 
major from Nigeria. He 
eventually (this spring) hopes 
to leave the hallowed halls of 
NSU and return to his country 
to work in some facet of the 
journalistic field. 

Ronnie Buzzetta is a jour- 
nalism public relations major 
with one thing on his mind at 
times— the New Orleans JAZZ 
and Pete Maravich. Ronnie is 
quite a sports buff when he is 
not watching the scenery. He 
is the most recent draftee to 
the CURRENT SAUCE staff. 
He is the staff champion 
bowler (I think this a disputed 
title). Whenever he is not 
arguing petty issues with the 
staff Ronnie works just as 
hard as the next person to 
make the newspaper as pro- 
fessional as possible. 

Mark Smith is the most 
essential member of the staff. 
Without advertising, it would 
be very difficult to put the pa- 
per out. Our advertising 
manager recently married, so 
at times he is very ab- 
sentminded. The rest of the 
staff tease him constantly but, 
desptie the undue pressure, 
Mark does a very good job 
selling advertising. 

Next week I will introduce 
the remaining members of the 
staff and give you a little more 
insight into this lively group of 
individuals who work together 
to put out the CURRENT 
SAUCE each week. 



The CURRENT SAUCE is 

presently looking for a 
business manager and a 
photographer for next 
semester. Anyone interested 
in these positions should stop 
by the office, Room 225 of the 
Arts and Science Building or 
call 5456. 

Persons applying for 
the position of business 
manager must have at least 45 
semester hours, accounting 
courses, and an overall 2.0 
GPA. 



To Julie Lightfoot 



Dear Julie, 

Hey girl, I've really been 
meaning to write to ya, but 
I've had so much to do... Today 
is Wednesday and I was so dis- 
appointed I didn't get to see ya 
when you came by. 

Oh, Julie, why? I'm not too 
good with words. You were 
always the one that was so 



coming back this spring to that will live on forever, 
school. Julie, I'm so sorry. If A dear friend's life 
only I could tell you. taken, someone I meant 

Julie Lightfoot was a dear write or call. Please, I j 
friend of mine, a beautiful, you, don't wait or put 
warm, talented girl I loved, calling or letting a friend 
She's gone now through tragic loved one know you r^w 
death. She was the most Don't wait too late like I 
talented beautiful person I've Thanks, Julie, for all 
ever been privileged to know, wonderful things you gavj 
gifted, not only in beautiful she had so much to offer that shared with me. And th| 
words, but in every way. I it seems so unfair. Why? I for being my friend. I | 
remember all the crazy nights wish everyone could have you! 
you laughed at my corny jokes known her. All she did have Julie Lightfoot died 
or you always had time to she gave. I prayed thanks to Tuesday, October 26, 19?j 
listen to my little problems. I God for letting her share a Many, Louisiana, 
meant to call you or write. I portion of her life with me. She A R| 

really did! But then you were touched everyone she met and 



r 



SG A at a glance 



November 1, 1976 



U.S. newspapers saved more than 500,000 tons of newsprint 
in 1975 through conservation measures. 
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiillllliiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir 



The Senate of Northwestern 
was called to order on 
November 1, 1976 at 6:40 p.m. 
Absent were Johnson and 
Wise. 

Martin announced that the 
two referendums (KNWD and 
Cheerleader) passed and that 
Ford won in the mock 
presidential election. She also 
announced elections for 
homecoming Wednesday at 
the Union and in Shreveport 
Thursday. 

Walker annoanced that the 
Student Services committee 
meeting would be changed 
from November 4 to 
November 8 at 3 p.m. Lynch 
announced the movie Thur- 
sday and concert Wednesday. 
McKellar announced meeting 
of Committee on Committees 
would be held Thursday at 2 
p.m. 

C. Davis discussed 
Discipline Committee and 
announced meeting for 
Executive Council at 6:30 
Wednesday. Davis also 
discussed Exec parking 
stickers and La. Lobby meeti- 
ng. 

OLD BUSINESS 

Price discussed beer issue; 
Ryder discussed beer 
situation at USL, and ex- 
plained that City Council was 



in favor but Kilpatrick was 
opposed. C. Davis discussed 
state law concerning beer on 
campus. 

Pittard discussed getting 
out for election; Galloway 
said that McNeese was the 
only insitution in the state who 
got out for the election. 
NEW BUSINESS 

Lynch moved to accept 
election results, Lane 
seconded, motion passed. 
Haynes asked for Senators 
help in elections Wednesday 
and announced that 
Homecoming queen will be 
announced at the dance 
Friday night November 12. 

Nominations from SGA for 
Mr. and Miss NSU are Stan 
Haynes and Patty Harvey. 

Bill Hochstetler discussed 
Intramurals and NSU's 
division winners playing 
Tech's winners. Hochstetler 
asked for financial help to 
cover minimum expenses 
which would include $5.50 per 
hour for bus driver and $5.00 
for meal; also 30 cents a mile 
to and from Tech. Pittard 
moved to consider this as an 
emergency bill. McKellar 
seconded. Motion passed. 
Nugent moved to approve the 
bill, Lane seconded, motion 
passed. 

Walker discussed allocation 
of $25.00 to pay man for 




I What's the name for a private 
compartment for making phone 
calls? A John Wilkes Booth. B. Phone 
booth. C. Isolation booth. 

2 True or false. You can save up to 
60% (luring the week when you 
dial long distance the 1+ way before 
an 8 a.m. class instead of after 

3 What's the best way to get in 
touch with out-of-town friends 
and relatives? A. Tie messages to ear- 
ner pigeons. B. Dial 1+ long distance 
phone calls. C. Yell real loud. 

4 True or false. It's cheaper to dial 
long distance the 1 + way Mon- 
day thwugh Friday from 5 p.m. to 8 
a.m. than it is from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

5 Tine or false. Person-to-person 
and collect calls always cost more 
than calls you dial yourself, the 1 + 
way. 



6 How can you save your out-of- 
town friends some money? 

A. Give them your phone number so 
they can dial you the 1 + way. B. Stop 
spending weekends with them. C. Quit 
calling them collect. D. All of the above. 

7 At 5:00 Sunday afternoon, rates 
for dialing 1 + calls: A. Go up. 

B. Go down C. Stay the same. 

8 If your budget is overspent again 
and you dial long distance the 
1 + way after 11 p.m. to get more 
money from home, you will: A. Get a 
busy signal. B. Wake up your folks. 

C. Be a smart caller. D. Wish you 
hadn't. 

9 When is the very cheapest time 
to dial a 1+ call? A From 11 p.m. 
to 8 a.m. B. All weekend until 5 p.m. 
on Sunday. C. Weekdays, 8-5. 




South Central Bell 



rushing stadium light for 
intramural playoffs. Nugent 
moved to consider as an 
emergency bill. Lane 
seconded, motion passed. 
Nugent moved to accept bill, 
Lane seconded, bill passed. 

C. David appointed Lynch, 
Dyess, and Nugent to 
Discipline Committee 



Thursday. SGA picture 
the POTPOURRI will beg 
at next meeting. 

Dyess moved to adjg 
Nugent seconded, met 
adjourned at 7:25 p.m. 



Respctfully subnu a conce 



Debbiel 
Senate ( 



Readers 

commen 



Dear Editor, 

I was terribly disappointed 
and disgusted this morning 
when I came across the 
Communist Party's ad- 
vertisement in your current 
issue. It seems to me that 
there are not any ideals, not 
any pricniples of patriotism 
among the ones who permitted 
such an atrocity. Do you know, 
Mr. Editor, how many 
millions of people have died 
and how many millions are 
enslaved this very day in the 
name of that vicious and evil 
Communist Party? Have you 
heard of that famous "WALL" 
that separated freedom from 
slavery in East Berlin? Where 
are the principles of faith in 
this great Republic of 
America found in your paper? 

Today, October the 27th, 118 
years ago, a great American 
was born. He later became the 
President who changed the 
course of history and proved 
to the whole worled the 
strength, prosperity and the 



Tat 
The 
chapter i 
elected 
Wilfred ( 
thelFC. 
until ele 
The w 
Three I 
Kepler I 
with the 
ucipatinj 
would 1 
gratitude 
for their 
Saturday 
Prepai 
made foi 
particip 
chitoches 
Festival, 
ticipate i 



riverfroi 
Al 

Last f 
pledge ( 
party a 
Chateru 
had a pit 
the elder 
attended 
Cloutierv 
had a bus 
The Spl 
to ackno\ 
as their 
sweetheai 
like to cc 
Miller for 
Isemifinab 
the Brae 



UNWANTED h a ir trom the 
arms, legs ft face 
REMOVED. ..quickly and 
permanently by a Registered 
Electrologist. "O. J." 
Johnson, 1013 Parkway Drive, 
Phone 352-4983. By ap 
pointment only 



vigor of the Republic of 

United States. And bide 

Theodore Roosevelt, with 

exception of Herbert Horn 

was the LAST great Amen 

president this country e 

had. The reasons of v) 

failure to portray him at 

do not know. However, I L 

to be a fact that "Those wW Sphinxm ' 

not STUDY history's Alpha 

lessons, are condemned |' retners 

repeat it." 

You owe to several pal 

students an explanation 

OWE to tell them 

Communist propaganda 

primary place in your 

rather than the principli 

Freedom and Faith 

seem to be forgotten i 

neglected. You OWE to 1 

them the truth. You OWE I 

Truthfi APPRA 

Tony B. Dedeghica, EACH ASS 

Foreign sd " You * 
Wljallyi 

to plan." 

(If you know your hist 
you know that all Written 
guaranteed the freedom 4cate y« 
speech under the f TOrk - ot 
Amendment to the prtanttb 
stitution. 



party. Tl 
Inspiratio 



la 




KM 

800 SECOND STREET 

STUDENT SPECIAL 

2 PIECES OF CHICKEN 
AND FRENCH FRIES- 



(WITH THIS COUPON) 

OFFER GOOD THRU NOV. 16, 1976 



HAPPY ENDINGS 
BEGIN HERE! 




what is c 

The paper ran adverted! ins 
for the Republican Party «>mmon 
have turned down the ! elther "1 
munist party ad would I Papers. Aj 
left the CURRENT S*!*^ askt 
open to a lawsuit for vioW about the 

of guaranteed rights.) ^ 

„*. And 
yourself pi 
the deadUi 
Reports 
ability t< 
fleact to s 
read. An 
expects a 
I* contei 
article, yc 
author's 
»tyle, you 
to the wor 
* its imp 

CI Hesearc 
I Of your l 

topic, invt 
the matei 
J about it 
,itcurately. 1 
^ choose 
about yoi 
handle it? 
pre enou 
*tour or fi 
should be 

affective i 
to use ind 
"hould in 
author, p 
Page num 



99 



LAY-AWAl 

FAR ^uence 
rVI1 -|*«teabo 

CHRISTMAS^ 

WELCOME HO^RT^ 
- , ALUMNI" 

CARTER'S .i4c , 

ICMf El DV hwy i south 

JEffCl.lfI PHONE 352-8*', 



Thous. 

P*l tor v 
S 9 *. mail < 
J'-OO to 

* E SEARCr 
'1322 II 
L °S ANGI 
121 

Ou, 



rejeatc 
'eiearc 




November 9, 1976 CURRENT SAUCE Page 3 



ive on forever. 

friend's life 
neone I meant 
call. Please, I 
t wait or put 

letting a friend 
; know you ^ 
t too late like 1 

Julie, for all 

things you gave 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 

The Epsilon-Upsilon 
th me. And" tlj chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon 



my friend. I i„ 

Jghtfoot died 
October 26, 197) 
uisiana. 

AFrj, 



As TTK^ 

ZS>B 



Greek Review - 



KE 1 



elected Mike Anyan and 
Wilfred Gregoire to serve on 
the IFC. They will fill the posts 
until elections in Spring '77. 

The weekend retreat and 
Three Fires ceremony on 
Kepler Lake was a success 
with the entire chapter par- 
ticipating. The active chapter 
would like to express our 
gratitude to the pledge class 
for their helpful assistance on 
Saturday morning, 
ly. SGA picturet Preparations are being 
POURRI will ben made for the TKE chapter's 
meeting. participation in the Nat- 

moved to adji chitoches Christmas Light's 
seconded, met Festival. We plan to par- 
ticipate in the parade and with 
a concession booth on the 
riverfront. 



ed at 7:25 p.m. 

Respctf ully submj 
Debbiel 
Senate! 



men 

the Republic of 
States. And inde 



Alpha Phi Alpha 

Last Friday the Sphinx 

pledge club gave a warm 

party at the Riverside 

Chater.u Nursing Home. They 

had a pleasant time visiting 

the elderly. The Sphinxmen 

attended a talent show in 

Ctoutierville. All in all they 

had a busy week of activities. 

The Sphinxmen would like 

; Roosevelt, with" to acknowledge Lisa Conant 

i of Herbert H*> their " 1976 fal1 " line 
sweetheart. They also would 

I Oils' country I 1 * 6 to congratulate Charlene 

e reasons of ^ mer for makil ^ il ^ *■ 

> portray him at: 

iow. However, I 



semifinals of the "Lady of 
the Bracelet" contest. The 
ct that' Those wfaol s P nuinnen would to thank 
IDY history's J I* Alpha Angels and their big 
are condemned] lrathers for supporting the 
party. They commend the 
I Inspirational Choir on their 



taper ran 
Republican Parly 
rned down the 



a lawsuit for violi 
mteed rights.) 



COND STREET 

1€* 



99' 



Clarity, accuracy are indicators of 
ability to write, grasp classwork 



re to several pat 
an explanation 

tell them 
list propaganda 

place in your 
nan the principle! 

1 and Faith wti 

) be forgotten t 

d. You OWE to 

; truth. You OWE 

^thfJ APPRAISE AND OUTLINE 

Pony B. Dedeghic* EACH ASSIGNMENT 

Fnr*i.7n Still " You don ' t nave to P lan to 

fail ; all you have to do is fail 
to plan." 

Anonymous 
Written assignments in- 
dicate your grasp of class 
p work. Obviously it is im- 



second anniversary. 

Sigma Tau Gamma 
The brothers of Sigma Tau 
Gamma held their annual 
Halloween Haunted House, 
Sunday the 31st. The house 
was decorated inside and out 
with Spanish moss. All the 
first floor was used in which 
each room was something 
different. One room had a 
talking skull in a cedar room; 
another room was filled with 
people that were crazy. 
Another room was a surgery 
room where doctors operated 
and last was a morgue where 
creatures like Dracula and 
Wolfman were in their coffins. 

The project, which is held 
every year, turned out to be a 
real success. Alot of town's 
people and their children 
thoroughly enjoyed the treat. 
As the children left the house, 
candy was given to them. 

Sig Tau would like to 
congratulate Coach A. L. 
Williams and football players 
for doing a great job against 
Northeast. 

Sig Tau defeated TKE in the 
volleyball game Monday night 
November 2. 

Congratulations goes out to 
Kade Burdin and Sunshine 
Cloud on their recent 
engagement. 

Special thanks goes to Jerry 
Hale and rose Lucy Wartelle 
for working extra hard in 
preparing for the haunted 
house, and all the roses mat 
participated. 

Kappa Sigs 
The Kappa Sigs recently 
held a party for the special 



education children from 
Parks Elementary. The 
children are taught by Wayne 
Alford. The Kappa Sigs went 
undefeated in intramural 
football league until losing a 
heartbreaker to Couyon 8 on 
the Turf. We would like to 
thank Bill Stewart for his 
excellent coaching. 

The chapter would like to 
congratulate their new of- 
ficers for the upcoming year: 
Grand Master-Andrew Duke 
McGlatrery, Grand 
Procurater-David M- 
cKinney, Grand-Treasurer- 
John McKellar, Grand Scribe- 
Jay Warley, and Grand 
Master of Ceremonies Mark 
Fehl. 

Plans are underway for the 
3rd Annual Kappa Sigma 
Benefit Bowl to be held in 
Demon stadium on Dec. 3. The 
Kappa Sigs will be playing the 
boys from down the street, 
Kappa Alpha. It should be an 
interesting game, so we en- 
courage everyone to make 
plans to attend. 

We would also like to wish 
the Demons luck against USL 
for our homecoming. The Sigs 
will hold their victory and 
homecoming dance at the 
Jaycee Hall. We will also hold 
an open house for all the KE 
alumni all day Saturday. 



PhiMu 

All the Phi Mus are proud of 
Scotti Dawson and Denise 
Gueringer who are among the 
twenty finalists chosen in the 
Lady of the Bracelet pageant. 
Good Luck on the 17th girls! 

Phi Mus volleyball team has 



been hard at work practicing 
and week before last defeated 
Tri-Sigma's team. 

On October 31, after the 
regular meeting, the Phis took 
their Big Sisters on a 
Halloween trip, then everyone 
returned to the Phi Mu House 
where the Big Sisters received 
pumpkins stuffed with candy. 

This week we are still 
working on our Homecoming 
display. Also, we are planning 
an open house to be held on 
Saturday afternoon for 
parents and alumnae. We 
would like to wish the Demons 
the best of luck against USL. 

Kappa Alpha 

The Brothers of Kappa 
Alpha congratulate the 
Demons on their excellent 
performance against the 
Indians last Saturday. Many 
of the brothers were in Monroe 
to give their support. After the 
game everyone attended 
Gamma Mu chapter's post 
game party. Special 
recognition goes to Stan 
Foster for a fine performance 
in the offensive line. KA 
wishes the team luck against 
McNeese. 

Gamma Psi is proud to 
announce the pledging of two 
new brothers, Pat Tobin and 
Kirk Coleman. The order 
welcomes its new brothers to 
the chapter. Congratulations 
go tto Eddie Childers and 
Scotty Wise. Eddie is the new 
Athletic Director and Scotty 
has been named Old South 
Director. 

Kappa Alpha is currently 
preparing for the maybe up 



and coming Charity Bowl. The 
Sigs seem to be undecided as 
to when they would like to play 
it. The two squads have 
clashed twice before with 
expected results. The first, 
played in cold weather, 
produced a kill for the 
Southern Gents over the Sigs 
20-0. The boys from down the 
street produced only minus 
yards in that game. The 
second game was a little 
closer (22-6) as KA again 
rolled on to victory. Mr. 
Christmas was kept busy the 
next week repairing green- 
shirted players. Everyone is 
really looking forward to even 
greater victory this (?) 
semester. 



Delta Zeta 
Delta Zeta celebrated 
Halloween Sunday night with 
a party held at the Delta Zeta 
Lodge and Spook Sisters were 
revealed at the party. 

Delta Zeta held a dance 
November 5, in the Student 
Union with disco music 
provided. The Theme of the 
dance was Beach Party. 
Everyone had a blast. 

Delta Zeta is in the process 
of electing officers for the 1977 
year. Good Luck girls. 

Congratulations go the Anne 
Manson for pledge of the we- 
ek, Sunshine Cloud and 
Marian McLaurin for being 
engaged, Suzette for being 
dropped, Vanessa Davis, 
Jackie Phillips, Spring Cloud 
and Sherry Anderson for being 
nominated for the 
Homecoming court. 



u know your hist 
iow that a 
eed the freedom 

under the 
ment to the (jportant that you know exactly 
what is excpeted of you in 
advert! eac h instance. The most 
common assignments are 
((either reports or research 
party ad would I Papers. Appraise what you are 
CURRENT SAifetag asked to write. Think 
about the research, reading, 
and writing you will have to 
And be sure to allow 
fW 1- *"""] yourself plenty of time to meet 
the deadline, 
Reports are a test of your 
law I ability to understand and 

2# I react to something you have 

f tead. An instructor usually 

expects a short summary of 
tbe content of the book or 
article, your comments on the 
author's presentation and 
style, your personal reaction 
fP A I ■ I to the work, and an evaluation 
EUlAaV of its importance 

Research papers are a test 
of your ability to choose a 
topic, investigate it, organize 
the material, and then write 
about it clearly and ac- 
curately. When you are asked 
t° choose a topic be realistic 
about your choice. Can you 
fcl fit £ handle it? Does your library' 
Wm flfl ^ have enough resource books? 

Four or five sources, at least, 

El should be used. The most 

B effective way to collect data is 

to use index cards. Each card 
fthould indicate the source, 
author, publisher, date and 
Page number. After you have 
completed the research, 
arrange the cards in a 
1 'aquence that will allow you to 

- Tite about the subject with 
continuity and coherence. 



Before you begin writing a paragraphs should develop 
report or paper it is always the main idea in an orderly 
best to make an outline of way, with each paragraph 
what you plan to say. Outlines containing a transition from 
are as indispensable to such the preceding one. The final 
writing as blueprints or paragraph should summarize 
drawings are to carpenters, and conclude what has been 
First, write down the main said. By reading the first and 
headings, leaving several last paragraphs of most non- 
lines of space in between, fiction writing, you should be 



Then, each of the headings, 
list the subheadings that are to 
be covered. Identify the 
specific points that should be 
developed under the 
subheadings, and so on. When 
the blueprints of the material 



able to grasp both premise 
and conclusion of an author's 
thoughts. 

After you have completed 
toe initial draft, put it aside 
for two or three days. Come 
back to review it when you are 



is complete, you are ready to fresh. Be a stern critic. Have 

start writing. Organize your you started each heading or 

outline well, follow it subheading with a topic 

carefully, and your written sentence or paragraph that 

presentation will reflect a states what you are setting out 

logical and thorough to do? Do toe main sections 

development of the subject, and subdivisions present the 



WRITE, REVIEW AND 
REVISE 

"Those who write clearly 



material clearly? Have you 
omitted points that you listed 
in the outline? Is there un- 



have 



com- 



have readers, those who write necessary or repetitious in- 
formation? Does the con- 
clusion summarize what has 
gone before? Are your foot- 
notes and bibliography 



obscurely 
mentators." 

Albert Camus 
When you are ready to start 
writing, make sure that you h- correct? 
ave your reference notes and Once you have gone over the 



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books nearby, a good light, 
and good writing tools. Plan to 
work without interruption for 
one or two hours. Your outline 
will serve as your guide. 

Even the most ac- 
complished writers except to 
make many revisions. So, 
when you write the first draft, 
concentrate on content and 
clarity more than on style. It 
is a good idea to leave plenty 
of space between lines for the 
corrections, additions, and 
polishing that will come later. 

The introductory paragraph 
in a composition should give a 
clear idea of what you are 
setting out to do. Subsequent 

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PRINTING 



draft for content and ac- 
curacy, review and edit it for 
style. Try to read as ob- 
jectively as you can. Rm- 
member the underlying im- 
portance of grammar and 



criticize your use of words, 
phrases, clauses, sentences, 
and paragraphs. Does one 
thought flow evenly and ob- 
viously from another? 

You might want to change 
the sequence of sentences or 
paragraphs for better 
presentation. If so, cut, shift, 
and staple new parts together. 
Try to be as brief as possible. 
Delete what is superfluous and 
distracting to your main 
thoughts. It has been said that 
crisp writing usually has a 
good deal of shortening in it! 
The total effect must be 
readable. Rewrite a section if 
necessary. Remember that 
carelessness in spelling, 
punctuation, and 
capitalization will also in- 
fluence the quality of your 
work. 

Now you are ready to make 
the final copy. Type it if you 
can, or write very legibly with 
a carbon copy for future 
reference. Leave generous 
margins on the left and right 
sides of each page. When you 
have finished, proofread the 
paper, making any correc- 
tions neatly. Review your 
references or footnotes once 
again for accuracy. It is 
always a good idea to prepare 
a title page and if possible, to 
submit the completed 
assignment in a folder or 



binder. 

Your grades may depend on 

how well you have mastered 

these writing techniques. 
When your marked paper has 

been returned, review the 

instructor's comments-you 

can learn from mistakes you 

might have made. Remember 

that how well you write will 

also be an important measure 

of your success after you leave 

school. With patience and 

hard work you can experience 

the satisfaction of being happy 

with the content and style of 

your writing. The choice of 

words is right, the grammar is 

correct, the flow of languate is 

smooth, and it says just what 

you hoped it would ! That is the 

reward of a successful writer. 

This article, "How to Build 

Your Writing Skills," is one in 

a series developed for college 

students by the Association of 

American Publishers. Other 

topics in the series are "How 

to Get the Most Out of Your 

Textbooks," 

"How to Prepare Suc- 
cessfully for Examinations," 
and "How to Improve Your 
Reading Skills." Individual 
copies are available in booklet 
form free of charge to 
students. If you would like 
copies please write to: AAP 
STUDENT SERVICE, One 
Park Avenue, New York, N.Y. 
10016. 



Project presents challenge 



The National Influenza 
Immunization Program of 
1976 presents a challenge of 
new proportions to the people 
of the United States. 

The magnitude of this 
project in preventive 
medicine — providing vaccine 
for more than 200 million 
Americans within a six-month 
period of time — will take the 
talents and initiative of people 
everywhere. 

What led to this effort? 
Essentially, these facts: In 
February 1976, a strain of 
human influenza, called 
"swine flu" and scientifically 
designated A-New Jersey-76 
(HswlNl), was isolated 
during an outbreak of 
respiratory disease among 
recruits at Ft. Dix, N. J. 
Twelve cases were confirmed, 
. with one death. Blood testing 
of recruits indicated that 
several hundred more were 
infected. Since this was a 
major change from viruses 
currently circulating in the 
human population, and since 
such major changes have 
historically triggered world- 
wide epidemics (pandemics) 
of influenza, the potential for 
another pandemic was ap- 
parent to influenza experts. 

The Public Health Service; 
the Department of Health, 
Education, and Welfare; 
President Ford and the 
Congress, on the advice of 



panels of independent 
scientists, decided there was 
need for extraordinary 
measures. 

As a result, the decision was 
made to prepare for a mass 
immunization program, 
gambling with the cost of such 
a program, rather than with 
the lives of people who might 
be facing a serious flu pan- 
demic. 

It will take the combined 
strength of governmental and 
private services, supported by 
essential voluntary resources, 
to successfully, complete this 
program. 

Specifically, what can you 
do? 

The first responsibility is to 
keep informed. Information 
on influenza is available 
through many offices of HEW, 
the Public Health Service and 
the Center for Disease Control 
in Atlanta. 

You can volunteer 
assistance to local health 
departments in your com- 
munities. You can help inform 
the public by preparation and 
distribution of educational 
materials and other necessary 
papers for the administration 
of vaccine. You can assist in 
public information campaigns 
and in organization and 
coordination of volunteer 
committees. 

Those with medical or 
public health experience can 
assist in actual administration 



of the vaccine when im- 
munization begins in early 
fall. 

In short, there is a volunteer 
job to be done by anybody who 
wants to take part in this 
national public health effort. 
Literally hundreds of 
professional, voluntary and 
civic organizations are 
pledging their participation — 
to spread the word and to take 
part in community im- 
munization activities. Check 
with your local Public Health 
Authority which has the 
responsibility of coordinating 
the effort in your area. 

To sum it up, the national 
influenza immunization 
program of 1976 is solidly 
based on scientific evidence 
and past experiences with the 
disease. It is designed to 
protect every individual 
against a potentially serious 
health threat. 

The influenza immunization 
will be given on the Nor- 
thwestern campus Dec. 1 & 2, 
according to Cecil Knotts. 
head of Student Services. Staff 
from the State Health 
Department will set up in 
Rooms 320 and 321 of the 
Student Union and administer 
the injection from 12-6 p. m. 
each day. 

Immunization is optional 
but all faculty, staff, students, 
and their dependents are 
urged to make use of the NSU 
facilities, said Knotts. 



GOCP director offers tips 



Summer has faded and toe 
days are shorter and cooler. 
Week-nights are spent 
checking out television's new 
fall line-up and weekends are 
for football. 

It's new car season. 

"Many people get so caught 
up in the excitement of buying 
a new car that they fail to 
make a wise decision," says 
Charles W. Tapp, director of 
the Governor's Office of 
Consumer Protection 
(GOCP). 

Tapp advises that what you 
buy and where you buy are 
equally important and offers 
these suggestions to consider 
when purchasing a new car: 

(1) Purchase the car from a 
reputable dealer. Check out 
the dealer's reputation with 
the state or local consumer 
protection agency or the local 
Better Business Bureau. Talk 
to persons who have pur- 
chased cars from the dealer. 

(2) Buy from a local dealer 
if possible. Purchasing the car 



from a dealer a hundred miles 
or more away for a good price 
can cost more if you must 
travel for service and repairs. 
Remember, it might be dif- 
ficult to get prompt service or 
any service from the local 
dealer who lost the sale. 

(3) Have all service work 
done before driving a new car 
off the lot. Do not be put off 
with instructions to bring toe 
car back some vague time in 
the future to add accessories 
or touch up a paint job. 

(4) Ask to test-drive toe 
specific car you want to 
purchase. Do not settle for 
driving a similar model 
demonstrator. 

(5) Avoid oral agreements. 
Be sure to get all promises in 
writing and from someone 
with authority. For example, 
if you will need a loaner car, 
get the promise from the 
manager , not a salesman. 

(6) Shop during the day. 
Darkness can hide flaws in the 
body of the car. Also, don't be 



a victim of high-pressure sales 
tactics. If the salesman comes 
on too strong, tactifully get 
away, come back later, and 
request another salesman. 

(7) Shop around for the car 
and bargain about the sticker 
price. This is only a suggested 
price and the amount it will be 
lowered depends on demand. 

(8) Consult the literature on 
automobiles. Car magazines 
and consumer publications 
test and compare the features 
of different automobiles. 

(9) Buy a car to suit your 
needs and don't overburden 
yourself with the expense. 
Remember that there arc 
always incidental expenses 
such as tax, license, insurance 
and minor repairs. 

All questions and comments 
should be sent to the Gover- 
nor's Office of Consumer 
Protection (P.O. Box 44091- 
Capitol Station, Baton Rouge, 
LA 70804) or call the toll free, 
State Public Assistance line: 
1-800-272-9868. 



There's just 
one word for beer. 



IBM Bond Copier 

Phone 352-6466 
132 St. Denis St. 







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Page 4 CURRENT SAUCE November 9, 1976 



It's fun to be a twin 



by Charlene Blume 
Another familiar look-a-like 
pair around campus is Stacy 
and Nancy Booker. The girls 
are a second pair of twins born 
to Dr. and Mrs. Norman 
Booker of Many. The first 
twins were a boy and girl born 
18 months before Stacy and 
Nancy. It is a rare thing for 
two sets of twins to be born in 
succession to the same per- 
sons. 

• Stacy, born two minutes 
before Nancy, says "It is a 
whole lot of fun being an 
identical twin." Stacy said 
that their mother stopped 
dressing them alike when they 
were in the second grade. The 



problem that faces some twins 
about having separate 
identities never bothered 
Stacy and Nancy. The girls 
have always been their own 
person. They share some the 
the same likes. 

Stacy said, "The one thing 
we do have different taste in is 
men." They never liked the 
same guy. Authorities say that 
often twins are prone to like 
the same man and often this is 
a major problem with them. 

They were out to eat one 
night and their dates got up to 
go somewhere. When the boys 
returned they sat with the 
wrong girl. Often Stacy said 
that people will come up to her 




and ask her questions about 
classes, and she will have no 
idea what they are talking 
about. They have mistaken 
her for Nancy. They have 
asked Stacy several times if 
she had gotten her hair cut 
thinking she was Nancy. 

Nancy said, "We have 
always felt our own in- 
dividuality." Nancy said they 
do share things such as cloth- 
es, but each girl buys her own 
and they switch off at times. 

The girls have a very close 
relationship. They are now 19 
years old, having just 
celebrated their birthdays on 
October 18. 

Nancy said that sometimes 
she will be thinking of a song 
and Stacy will start to sing it. 
They have often caught 
themselves thinking of the 
same things and said things 
about them at about the same 
time. 

Nancy said, "I wouldn't 
trade it for anything, I love it 
being a twin." 




Conspiracy : Believe it or not? 



NANCY BOOKER 




STACY BOOKER 



On the 13th anniversary of 
the death of John F. Kennedy, 
Kennedy assassination 
theories are an increasingly 
popular topic of interest on 
college campuses. According 
to an article in the December 
issue of Gallery magazine, 
few students believe that the 
findings of the Warren 
Commission are authoritative 
or totally valid. 

At some colleges the 
assassination theory has 
become an activist issue. 
Chris Conway, editor of the 
student paper at the 
University of Missouri, relates 
that his school's student body 
senate has endorsed a 
resolution asking Missouri's 
Congressional delegation to 
press for an investigation into 
Kennedy's murder, with 
lobbying by a group of campus 
assassination buffs. Yet, on 
other campuses, students 
generally observe the 
spreading controversy and 
theories without taking any 
action. As Robert Walker, 
editor of the student paper at 
the University of Utah 



remarked, "This attitude 
seems to reflect that laid 
back' wait-and-see approach 
common to isolated but aware 
communities." 

On most campuses, articles 
and speakers on assassination 
conspiracies increasingly 
draw students' attention. Jan 
Selinger, editor of the campus 
paper at Pennsylvania State 
University, remarked in the 
December issue of Gallery 
that when the Zapruder film of 
the assassination was shown 
on her campus, the event was 
attended by a near-capacity 
crowd. 

The college students' 
remarks in the Gallery article 
clearly demonstrate that 
America's current crop of 
college age youth were 
profoundly affected by the 
Kennedy assassination, even 
though the majority of college 
students were pre-schoolers at 
the time. According to Jan 
Selinger, "Today's college 
students were then too young 
to seriously thing about the 
assassination back in 1963. 
They are just now beginning to 



grasp what it all means. Sure 
we remember the day Ken- 
nedy was shot. And not only 
do we remember the day, we 
probably remember exactly 
what we were doing when we 
heard the news." 

Although the college editors 
surveyed in the Gallery article 
were of the opinion that the 
country had not been told the 
truth by the Warren Com- 
mission, neither did they 
believe that the Warren 
Commission deliberately lied 
to the public concerning their 
findings. Remarks Robert 
Walker, editor of the paper at 
the University of Utah. 

"The 

Warren Commission ob- 
viously did not do its job. 
There are too many 
irregularities and inve- 
stigative shortcomings in its 
report. 

I don't believe the 
Warren Commission con- 
sciously or willingly lied to the 
American public; but rather, 
gripped by the pressure of 
lingering emotional trauma, 
sought reassurance in the 



proclamation of selected fa^ 
as the truth. Now the oi 
truth we have is | 
widespread feeling that t£ 
real story is possibly mo,, 
massive, more complex, ^ 
more deeply connected to ^ 
vital organs of our gove^ 
ment than we want to reali^ 

Comments Steve Brown 
editor of the student paper y 
Southern Methodic 
University in Dallas, Texaj, 
"The people of this counttj 
was a little too quick to accept 
when the investigation 
revealed in the Sixties. They 
believed the Commission 
because they wanted to. It »a, 
easy, too easy, for a grievi^ 
nation to buy the notion thai 
one lone madman in Texaj 
had taken it on himself to faj 
the president. We accepted the 
story because we wanted to." 

The Gallery roundtablt 
discussion on Kennedy 
assassination theories is the 
third in a series written by 
editors of leading college 
newspapers discussing topical 
issues on campus. 



Girls embark on glory-bound trip 



MIRRORED BEAUTIES — Stacy Booker (left) 
and Nancy Booker are twins who grace Nor- 
thwestern's campus. The girls are active in ac- 
tivities and often confused by classmates. 



i 




QUEEN AT WORK-Cheryl Purcell, the reigning 
Lady of the Bracelet was captured in a moment of 
intense concentration. Cheryl, an art education 
major, is preparing to give up her title Nov. 17 a 
year full of happy memories. 



by Muftett Richardson 

Twenty girls have recently 
been selected during Lady of 
the Bracelet preliminaries to 
participate in the annual 
pageant scheduled for Nov. 17. 

Ronda Henson, Marylyn 
Bartek, Marian Holcomb, 
Diane (Scotti) Dawson, 
Denise Gueringer, Sherry 
Anderson, Lee Ann Blaufiss, 
Deborah Scott and Edna 
Davis are contenders for the 
pageant title. 

Included in the list of con- 
testants are Suzanne Johnson, 
Linda McKnight, Alliece Cole, 
Stephanie Davitt, Liz Posey, 
Jaree Sherrer, Edith Harris, 
Nell Reed, Debra McHaffey, 
Cynthia Black and Charlene 
Miller. 

This week CURRENT 
SAUCE will feature ten of 
these girls, with the other ten 
presented the following week. 

Marian Holcomb, who is 
majoring in elementary educ- 
ation for emotionally 
disturbed, presented a song 
called "Children" for her 
talent in preliminaries. 
Playing the guitar and 
singing, Marian quietly ex- 
pressed her deep love for 
children. A background was 
provided with a slide 
projection of groups of 
children. 

When Marian goes home to 
Bossier City it's to see four 
sisters and two brothers. She 
said, "I usually do stuff with 
my little sisters" which in- 



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eludes riding bikes. Marian is 
an RA in east Sabine. 

Sherry Anderson, head 
feature for NSU, did not use 
her talent of twirling for 
preliminaries. Sherry played 
a musical piece written by 
Eddy Clement, a freshmen 
music student. Coming from a 
musical family, Sherry has a 
sister at Tech who plays the 
trombone, a sister at Captain 
Shreve High in Shreveport 
who plays the trombone, oboe 
and saxophone, a father who 
plays the trumpet and Sherry 
said, "My mom plays the 
sewing machine." 

Commenting about the 
pageant Sherry said, "I 
wasn't half as nervous for the 
talent part as I was for the 
interview. The interview was 
nerve-racking!" 

Lee Ann Blaufuss 
represents Theta Chi 
Fraternity in LOB. She is 
secretary-treasurer for the 
little Sis's of the organization. 

Lee Ann stayed busy during 
the past summer as assistant 
director and choreographer 
for "Upward Bound," a 
musical poprock group. Her 
younger sister is a member of 
the group. At home in Bossier, 
she plays the piano, shops and 
rides horses. Lee Ann said, 
"I'm having so much fun!" 
when asked how she feels 
about the pageant, and added 
"I'm nervous to death." 

Deborah Scott, secretary of 
Sigma Kappa said "I figured 
I'd be too chicken. I never 
thought I could get up and sing 
like that," when asked about 
the prelims. Deborah is a RA 
for south Sabine and AWS 
vice-president. 

Deborah has four sisters, all 
graduated from NSU. Her 
sister Julia was a contestant 
in the 1975 Lady of the 
Bracelet pageant. 

Edna Davis, a green belt in 
karate, used her ten year of 
dancing lesson in her talent 
exhibition for prelims. She has 
been a student of tap, ballet, 
jazz and some classical ballet , 
This past summer she taught 
dance and modeling. 



A winner of over 30 beauty 
and talent trophies from state 
pageants in Baton Rouge, 
Edna said she was both willing 
and unwilling to enter LOB 
competition. When asked how 
she spends her spare time, 
Edna said, "My room is kind 
of a congregation place. 
Everyone on my floor came 
there to talk." 

Alliece Cole presented a 
Judy Garland hit "Get 
Happy" for her talent in 
prelims. When asked how she 
became involved with LOB, 
she said, "I was talked into it 
by 'someone special." She 
added, "It's a good experi- 
ence. I enjoy being around 
people and meeting new 
friends." 

Alliece, who has one 
younger sister and an older 
brother, is very involved with 
her church in Shreveport, 
Woodlawn Baptist. 

Stephanie Davitt is a 
transfer student from LSU- 
BR. She changed her major 
from Russian Area Studies 
(language, literature, history 
and government of the Soviet 
Union) to Library Sicence. 
She is also working for a 
major in Speech Education. 

Stephanie said, "I like to do 
as much as I can. I enjoy 
getting involved." This is 
evident in that she is a 
member of Purple Jackets, is 
on the Student Union 
Governing Board Film 
Committee, is a junior 
representative for AWS, is an 
RA in south Sabine, and is on 
the Staff Relations Com- 
mittee. 

Liz Posey picked up her 
talent for prelims on a trip to 
Africa this past summer. Liz 
sang three gospel songs in the 
Shona language of Rhodesia. 

Liz was on a team of three in 
Salisbury, Rhodesia as a 
missionary to the African and 
European churches in that 
area. "Going to Africa meant 
so much in my life. Christ was 
in the lives of these people, 
and it taught me a great 



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lesson... They taught us songs 
in their language and shared 
their smiles. Singing these 
songs brings back special 
memories of the African 
people." 

"I just hope that whoever 
wins LOB will represent 
Northwestern the best she 
can. I hope she is a girl that 
exemplifies Christian 
character and leadership an 
example to girls on campus 
for her high morals and 
standards with dreams that 
will some day become 
realities," said Liz concerning 
the pageant. 

Suzanne Johnson has been 
in the top ten of LOB for the 
past two years. She sang an 
aria from a Puccini opera for 
her talent. A member of the 
NSU Entertainers, Suzanne 
has an unusual job here at sch 
ool. "I take care of white 
rats— BIG ONES!" 

Suzanne hopes to become a 
therapist working with psyc- 
hologically and physically 
handicapped individuals. She 
would also like to sing semi- 
prof essionally. 

Scotti Dawson from 
Monument, Colorado, enjoys 
singing and climbing 
mountains. She is majoring in 
merchandising with her area 
of concentration in fashion 
marketing. 



A member of the NSU 
Entertainers, Scotti sang Neil 
Sedaka's "Breaking Up is 
Hard to Do." She has had four 
years of voice and two years of 



ballet. 

Next week Current Sauce 
will present the last ten girls 
in competition for the Lady of 
the Bracelet title. 



The ga 
battle 
defensiv 
toe expe 
for-allbi 
that eru 
quarter 
benches 
It was 
that bat 
thing th 
McNees 
TKO de 
Demons 
In a \ 
by the 
took an 
never tr 
There w 
contest, 




X 



SMILE GIRLS! -^Smiling is only one of the many 
aspects of a beauty contest. Going into the Lady of 
the Bracelet pageant Nov. 17 with high hopes are 
(seated) Stephanie Davitt and Alliece Cole, 
(standing 1 to r.) Edna Davis, Liz Posey, and 
Suzanne Johnson. 




More pretty girls-With 20 pretty girls to judge it is going to be 
hard to choose a new queen to claim the title of the Lady of the 
Bracelet. Accepting the challenge are Sherry Anderson, Marion 
Holcomb, Debra Scott, Lee Ann Blaufuss, and Scotti Dawson. 



Three o 
the long 
thwester 
ithletics, 
Guidry , 
Jimmy L 
and bask 
Willis, ha 
NSU'sGri 
of Fame. 
Election 
ball is the 
be univei 
athletic s 
the three 
•nnouncet 
Election ( 
Club and i 
Dr. Allei 
Member 
Health 
Bducatioi 
The tl 
••nored d 
•ctivities 
camj 
ifc held in 
*e day's 
WU be s 
"ghtasth 
"niversit' 

u. 

Guidry, 
*IU bring 
«e shrin« 
Slides Ni 
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Guidry, 
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tossing 
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oueh 11 



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November 9, 1976 CURRENT SAUCE Page 5 



t? 



i of selected I 
i. Now the 

have is 
feeling that 
s possibly 
re complex, ^ 
connected to ^ 

of our gover, 
? want to realia 

Steve Brow^ 



Meth odij| 
i Dallas, Texa. 
of this counttj 
o quick to accept 
investigate 
he Sixties. Thej 
e Commissioi 



y, for a grieving t 
> the notion that* 
idman in TeiajJ 
>n himself to fcji * 
We accepted the 
t we wanted to, 



;ry roundtabl/ 
on Kennedy* 
i theories is tl*J 
eries written bj* 
leading college J 
liscussing topical * 
npus. *• 

* 
* 
* 

«■ 
» 
* 



Current Sauce 
tie last ten girls 
i for the Lady of 
itle. 



Cowboys get TKO decision over NSU, 24-15 



The game was billed to be a 
battle between two good 
defensive ball clubs, but no 
one expected a full scale free- 
for-all between the two teams 
that erupted late in the fourth 
quarter that emptied both 
benches. 

It was hard to tell who won 
that battle, but there was one 
thing that was for sure: The 
McNeese Cowboys got the 



student paper a, flCO decision over the NSU 
Demons by the score of 24-15. 

In a very lack-luster game 
by the two teams, McNeese 
took an early 3-0 lead and 
never trailed in the contest. 
There was 11 turnovers in the 
contest, with the Cowboys 



being able to capitalize on 
more of them for the most 
points. 

As if early mistakes were 
going to be a signal of things to 
come, MSU started off getting 
the breaks very early in the 
game. On the Demons first 
possession of the game, the 
Demons were facing a 3 and 10 
situation at their own 25. 
Stuart Wright fired a pass, 
only to have it intercepted and 
returned to the 17 by Bill 
Mosley of the 'Pokes. The Nsi 
defense rose to the occasion, 
and the Cowboys had to settle 
for a field goal try. The snap 
from center rolled to the 
holder, who just laid the ball 



on the tee for kicker Conley 
Hathorn. Ha thorn, who had to 
hesitate because of the bad 
snap, booted the ball god 
enough for it to bounce on the 
cross bar and roll over for the 
three points. 

Two possessions later the 
Cowboys found themselves 
moving down the field thanks 
to penalties on the Demon 
defensive squad. The first 
penalty, a fifteen yarder for 
clipping, occured on a fourth 
down punt that gave the 
Cowboys new life and a first 
down at their own 50. Three 
plays later, a face mask 
penalty was called against 
NSU that moved the ball to the 



Demon 44. Runs by fullback 
Joe Crawford and Bobby 
Wilson and scampers by 
quarterb quarterback Jim 
Morvant moved the ball to the 
Demon 10. 

It didn't take long from 
here, as the 'Pokes scored on 
the first play of the second 
quarter with an eight yard 
pass from Morvant to split end 
Richard Ellender, who made a 
good catch in the end zone for 
the MSU touchdown. 

A 21 yard pass completion by 
Stuart Wright to Wyamond 
Waters put the Demons in 
scoring position after Mike 
Maggio recovered a McNeese 
fumble. The Demons could not 



move from the 20, and had to 
settle for a field goal. The 
attempt was good by Pen- 
dergraft, but McNeese was 
called for holding on the play. 
With a first and ten from the 
ten, Sidney Thornton took a 
pitch wide to the right side and 
rambled into the endzone for 
the first Demon touchdown. 

The last play of the first half 
was one that showed the 
inability of the Demons to 
capitalize on Cowboys errors 
because they made their own. 
Pass interference was called 
against MSU's Charlie Jef- 
ferson in the end zone with 
eighteen seconds left that 
gave the Demons a first and 



wanted to. It wa$ ^★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★i 




Pigskin Predictions 



Last weeks predictions were 
not as good as usual. One thing 
was certain though, and that 
was that I still beat Ryder. It 
was a bad week for Jerry 
Ford, as both he and his 



Michigan Wolverines lost to 
nobodies. 

This weeks guests are from 
our friendly confines at the 
Current Sauce. Ryder got his 
predictions done by Sister 



Helen, fortune teller on Hwy. 1 
(be needs any help). Colette 
Oldmixon, our fearless editor, 
is trying her best an has good 
predictions as does Ronnie 
Buzzetta, our assistant news 
editor. 







* NSU VS USL 

J LSU VS. MISS. ST. 
NLU VS W.TEX.ST. 
TUL VS RUTGERS 
NICH VS SLU 
t TECH VS. S MISS. 
MCNEESE VS LAMAR 

* GRAM VS NORFOLK ST. 
J BAMA VS NOTRE DAME 
I N. 0. VS DETROIT 

* HOUSTON VS CINCI 
j K. C. VS OAKLAND 
J MIAMI VS PITTS 

I NEW ENG. VS BALT 

* Last week's totals 

J Percentages to date 



BOSSIER 



USL 21-13 
LSU 20-13 
WTS 10-7 
RUTGERS 2&-7 
SLU 28-10 
S. MISS 42-14 
MSU 38-10 
GRAM 21-14 
BAMA 17-13 
DET. 35-3 
CINCI 28-13 
OAKLAND 35-21 
PITTS 27-24 
BALT. 42-28 



i of the many 
j the Lady of 
gh hopes are 
lliece Cole, 
Posey, and 



9-15, .60 
64-102, .63 



RYDER 



NSU 20-14 
MISS ST. 21-14 
NLU 30-21 
TUL 10-7 
NICH 21-7 
S. MISS 24-18 
LAMAR 13-10 
GRAM 24-14 
N. D. 24-3 
DET 30-24 
CINCI 14-0 
OAKLAND 28-7 
MIAMI 17-14 
BALT. 28-14 

8-15, .53 
56-102, .55 



BUZZETTA 

USL 20-14 
LSU 21-10 
WTS 30-16 
RUTGERS 14-13 
SLU 24-10 
S. MISS 34-7 
MSU 21-7 
GRAM 10-7 
N. D. 21-10 
DET. 20-15 
CINCI 24-21 
OAKLAND 28-13 
PITTS 24-7 
BALT. 34-28 



OLDMIXON 

NSU 17-14 
MISS ST. 14-13 
WTS 35-21 
TUL 10-7 
SLU 21-« 
S. Miss. 35-12 
MSU 244 
GRAM 21-20 
N. D. 17-14 
DET. 21-14 
CINCI 24-13 
OAKLAND 27-7 
PITTS 17-16 
BALT. 21-10 



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It 

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goal at the one yard line. 

On the first play after the 
interference call, Stuart Wrig- 
ht moved from the center to 
quickly, only to have the ball 
roll on the ground and be 
recovered by MSU's Jim 
Pousson. Instead of going into 
the intermission four points 
ahead, the Demons came up 
with zero and remained three 
points behind. 

Defensive struggle was the 
evident force in the third 
quarter play. Neither team 
could generate any con- 
sistency in their offense, and 
had to settle for an exchange 
of punts in the fifteen minute 
stanza. 

The fourth quarter provided 
the mistakes that would 
become factors in the scoring 
by both teams. Another 
fumble by Frank Haring gave 
the Cowboys the ball at their 
own 40. Big runs by quar- 
terback Terry McFarland and 
tailback Mike McArthur 

moved the ball to the Demon 
29. 

On fourth and four from the 
23, McFarland fired a pass to 
Alan Heisser on the far side 
line. A Demon defender 
missed the ball in an attempt 
for the interception, and 
Heisser raced fifteen yards 
into the endzone untouched for 
the Cowboy TD. 

Using Sidney Thornton on 
almost every down, the 
Demons began mounting a 
fairly impressive drive. A 
completion to tight end Pat 
Collins pushed the ball to the 
McNeese 27. On the next play, 
pass interference was called 
on the 'Pokes again in the end 
zone, this time on Tim Harris. 
With first and goal at the one, 



Wright held on to the ball and 
managed to squeeze into the 
endzone on a quarterback 
sneak. 

The Demons, in order to try 
and catch up with the 'Pokes, 
went for two points, which was 
a successful pass play to Pat 
Collins to make the score 17- 
15, Cowboys. 

The Demon defense, playing 
an exceptional game except 
for some costly penalties and 
mistakes in the secondary, 
were determined to give the 
offense a chance to score 
again. The Cowboys could not 
move, and were forced to punt 
to the Demons. 

On third down and 20 to go, 
after being sacked for 10 yards 
and an incompleted pass, 
Wright's next pass was in- 
tercepted by Tim Harris, who 
made an excellent return to 
the Demon two. 

Two plays later, Terry 
McFarland ran for the 
necessary two yards and for 
the final six points for the 
Cowboys. It was all the 'Pokes 
needed, as the score was 24-15. 

The ensuing kickoff 
provided the biggest fireworks 
of the contest. After Kenny 
Philibert returned the kick to 
the Demon 36, a pushing and 
shoving match erupted bet- 
ween several players. Within 
seconds, both benches had 
cleared and all of the players 
were on the field, Sheriff 
deputies rushed out onto the 
field to stop the disturbance, 
but found themselves severely 
outnumbered. 

Some players from both 
squads made the ultimate 
mistake by taking their 
helmets off to use them for 
weapons. It backfired on one 



Demon player, as a McNeese 
player bounced his helmet off 
the head of the helmet-less 

Demon. 

It wasn't the last headache 
the Demons were to suffer. On 
first down, after tempers had 
cooled, Wright threw his 
fourth interception of the 
evening that put the icing on 
the cake for McNeese. 

Sidney Thornton was almost 
all of the Demon offensive 
punch as he rushed for 94 of 
the 103 total rushing yards of 
the Demons. Mistakes on 
offense cost the Demons 

several golden oportunities to 
catch the 'Pokes. The Demon 
passing attack was also weak, 
as Wright hit on only 7 of 23 for 
82 yards and had four in- 
tercepted. 

The Demons will attempt to 
bounce back from a disc- 
ouraging performance in Lake 
Charles and return to the 

friendly confines of Turpin 
Stadium to face the Ragin' 
Cajuns from USL. The 
Demons have not lost on the 
artificial turf this season, but 
they will have their hands full 

against the undefeated 
Cajuns. USL has bested such 
opponents as La. Tech, 
Arkansas St., and the Univ. of 
Texas at Arlington so far this 
season. 

It will be the Demons' 92nd 
Homecoming, and the game 
will kickoff at 7:30 p. m. 
Saturday night. 



% Acuna outstanding in USL tourney 



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♦★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 

Former NSU athletes named to Hall of Fame 



Three of the top athletes in 
the long history of Nor- 
thwestern State University 
athletics, football star Don 
Guidry , basketball standout 
Jimmy Leach and baseball 
and basketball standout Jim 
Mllis, have been named to 
NSU's Graduate «N* Club Hall 
of Fame. 

Election to the prestigious 
all is the highest honor which 
Ihe university can bestow for 
athletic success. Election of 
three former greats was 
announced this week by the 
Election Committee of the 'IT 
Club and committee chairman 
Dr. Allen R. Bonnette, a 
Member of Northwestern's 
Health and Physical 
Education faculty. 
The threesome will be 



Not by coincidence, that 
period was one of the most 
outstanding in modern NSU 
football history. Demon teams 
compiled an overall 25-11 
record during that time, in- 
cluding an undefeated 9-0 
season in 1966 which is one of 
only two unbeaten seasons in 
school history. 

Guidry passed for 3,903 
yards and threw 38 touchdown 
passes during his career, 
setting school records in both 
categories. He also holds 
school marks for most passing 
yards in one game (331), most 
yards total offense in one 
game (373), most total offense 
yards in one season (2,101), 
most total offense yards in a 
career (4,753), most yards 
averaged per game (233.4), 



konored during Homecoming most completions in a career 
Activities on Nov. 13 on the (279), most completions in one 



NSU campus. A luncheon will 
held in their honor during 
day's activities, and they 
*U1 be special guests that 
"Ight as the Demons battle the 
University of Southwestern 
U. 

Guidry, Leach and Willis 
*iU bring the membership in 
•le shrine to 33. The Hall in- 
cudes Northwestern's out- 



game (24), most yards on one 
season (1,712) and most touch- 
down passes in a season (16). 

All total, Guidry holds 22 
school records and is listed in 
the NSU official football 
records a phenomenal 52 
times. 

Guidry coached for one year 
at Tioga High School before 
moving to Crowley, where he 



Leach, now principal of 
Florien High School, still holds 
the NSU record for most 
points in a single game with 
his 54-point performance 
against Southwestern La. in 
his senior yea. He also has the 
top three single-game per- 
formances of all time by a 
Northwestern basketball 
player. 

During that season Leach 
averaged 24.1 points per ball 
game, also a NSU school 
record, and his 675 points 
during that year is another all- 
time mark. 

Known for his scrappy 
defensive play in addition to 
his shooting, Leach also holds 
school records for most field 
goals in one season (229), most 
free throws attempted in one 
game (23) and most free 
throws attempted in one game 
(20). 

Leach moved into high 
school coaching after 
graduating in 1959 and has 
been a coach on the prep level 
for 15 years. He started at 
Saline before moving to 
Calvin, Coushatta and 



Tournament during all but one 
of his seasons at the school. 

Willis was a star on Nor- 
thwestern's first baseball 
team ever in 1948 under Coach 
Cracker Brown. As a pitcher, 
he was selected to the All-Gulf 
States Conference team as a 
sophomore and led the con- 
ference in winning. 

When Willis came to Nor- 
thwestern in 1944 the school 
didn't have a baseball 
program, so he concentrated 
on basketball and made the 
starting five as . a freshman 
under legendary coach H. Lee 
Prather. His team went 13-11 
that season. 

Willis left the club in the 
spring of 1945 to join the Army 
for a two-year hitch before 
returning to NSU in 1947. He 
was one of the outstanding 
individuals on teams that put 
together records of 15-5, 19-6 
and 23-5 from 1946 through 
1949. 

Those three teams also 
made an appearance in the 
national NAIB (forerunner of 
the NAIA) basketball tour- 
nament in Kansas City during 



the first round the first two 
years but making the quar- 
terfinals in 1949. It was 25 
years before another NSU 
team made a national tour- 
nament appearance, that 
most recent visit coming in 
1974. 

Willis later pitched for the 
Shreveport Sports and the 
Alexandria Aces in the old 
Texas League after turning 
down a $10,000 offer from the 
Cincinnati Reds. He had three 
straight winning seasons with 
the Shreveport squad before 
being sent to the Chicago Cub 
organization. 

Willis finally broke into the 
major leagues in 1953 with the 
Cubs and saw action for two 
seasons. At one time he pit- 
ched an eight-inning no-hitter 
against the St. Louis Cardinals 
and was chosen as the "Pit- 
cher of the Week" in the Berry 
Ratings. 

In 1954 he compiled a 9-1 
record with Omaha in the - 
Cincinnati organization before 
leaving the sport in 1957 after 
a brief stint with the 
Shreveport team. 



Ricardo Acuna was 
the outstanding individual 
player for Northwestern State 
University's tennis team last 
weekend as he advanced to the 
finals of the annual Univ. of 
Southwestern La. Fall ^In- 
tercollegiate Tournament. 

Acuna won three matches 
after an opening round bye in 
the 64-player draw before 
losing in the finals to Hal 
Gorman of LSU 7-6, 6-4. 
Gorman was the top-seeded 
player in the tournament, 
which was set up on an in- 
dividual basis and awarded no 
team title. 

Acuna downed Robert 
Rouse of LSU 6-4, 6-4, Drew 
Meyers of LSU 7-6, 6-2 and 
Gary Cannon of LSU 6-4, 6-3 to 
advance to the finals after 
entering the tournament as 
the second seed. 

Luis Varela and Gregg 
Manning each won two 
matches to reach the quar- 
terfinals before losing out. 
Varela defeated Mark Schultz 
of USL 2-6, 6-1, 6-3 and Mark 



Shoptaugh of LSU 4-6, 6-3, 6-0 
before falling to Gorman 6-2, 
6-3, while Manning downed 
Hugh Fischer of McNeese 6-2, 
64 and Steve Kohler of USL 7- 
5, 6-3 before losing to Cannon 
6-4, 6-3. 

Steve Fricker and Jose 
DeCamino each won one in- 
dividual match, Fricker 



Suliemanji of Grambling 6-1, 
6-3 in the first round of doubles 
before falling to Allen 
Chandronnait and Robert 
Rouse of ISU 7-5, 6-4. 

Manning and Fricker also 
won one doubles match, 6-4, 4- 
6, 6-4 over Arthur Heygate and 
Esteban Ventura of McNeese, 
before falling to Gary Cannon 



halting Harry Norsworthy of and Hal Gorman of LSU 6-3, 6- 
Grambling 7-6, 6-4 before 4 i n the second round, 
falling to Steve Hernandez of The NSU tennis squad takes 
USL 6-4, 6-0. DeCamino a weekend off from activity 
defeated Eddie McCool of LSU this Saturdey before returning 
6-2, 34, 6-3 before losing to to the courts Friday, Nov. 12 in 



Danny Freundielieb of USL 7- 
6, 6-1. 

Juan Lopez didn't fare quite 
as well as he dropped his 
opening match 6-4, 6-2 to 
Meyers. 

In doubles play, Acuna and 
DeCamino entered the 
tournament as the top-seeded 
team before being upset 74, 6- 
4 by Eddie McCool and Frank 
Hennesey of LSU in the 
opening round. 

Varela and Lopez defeated 
Norsworthy and Stevp 



Baton Rouge in a dual match 
with powerful LSU. 



C* 8 





g to be 
t of the 
Marion 
awson. 



landing coaches and athletes. 1,88 teen on m e staff for seven 
Guidry, currently living in years. 
Rowley where he is an As Guidry dominates the 
•asistant football coach and football records, so Leach 
ll *ad track coach at Crowley does with NSU's basketball 
^gh School, still holds vir- standards. The sharp-shooting 
Wly all of Northwestern's guard was the sparkplug of 
tossing records. He Demon squads from 1955 
totablished the impressive list through 1959 that compiled an 
* marks during a four-year overall record of 70-40 in four 
^"eer that spanned from 1965 seasons. 
SrouBh 1968. 



Clinic set 



Leesville before accepting the the three seasons, losing out in 
head coaching job at Florien. 

At Florien, Leach won three 
state championships, in 1972, 
1974 and 1975. He also made 
the Black Cats a perennial 
playoff contender in taking 
them to the Top Twenty 



A backpacking and 
Whitewater clinic will be held 
tonight at 7 : 30 p .m. in the P.E. 
Majors Gym. Dusplays of all 
kinds of backpacking, 



Whitewater canoeing, and 
kayaking equipment, along 
with short talks discussing 
various aspects of these 
sports. 



^o^THE HITCH HH^ I 



i 



B 
A 
R 
B 

l E 

Q 

U 
I E 



^CHOPPED BEEF^ 1 
P0-B0YS 

2/H.50 

WITH THIS COUPON 

Expires Nov. 12, 1976 





BEST WISHES TO THE 
NSU DEMONS!! 

From the New!! 



352 6002 & dyle dtop 

Thad Longlois Clyde Salard 

Billy Scroggins 



Profits 



A two-way street 
that helps 
power America 7 . 



TWO WAY 




Like any other form of private enterprise, 
investor- owned utility companies have to be 
financially sound We have to make a reasonable 
profit And this profit is put back to work to make 
sure our customers will have the electric energy 
they need Now and in the future 

How do we put our profits to work? Some of it 
helps in building new generating stations and 
distribution centers to provide energy In constructing 
transmission and distribution lines to carry the 
increasing load In improving our existing community 
facilities and building new ones to more effectively 
handle our customers needs 

And. like other investor-owned companies, some 
of our profits go to pay dividends to our shareholders 
who are looking for a reasonable return on their 
invested dollars But profits are only part of the story 
Profits also enable utilities to be in a financially sound 
position in order to borrow hundreds of millions of 
dollars needed to finance our on-going construction 
programs 

Building for the future takes money And the costs 
for providing energy for your future are rising every 
day Profits help And as we said, this is a two-way 
street that helps us to power America 

Supporting the *vse and ett'Cient use ot ewg* 

VOL R I IV! LOUISIANA INVESTOR-OWNED ELECTRIC COMPANIES 

Central Louisiana Electric Company Gu't States Utilities Company 
Louisiana °ower & L ght Company New Orleans PutfC Service Inc Southwestern Eiectrtc Power Company 



Page 6 CURRENT SAUCE November 9, 1976 



Danforth gives aid 



The Danforth Foundation , 
of St. Louis Missouri, has long 
been active in giving 
fellowships for graduate 
education. The foundation 
declared recently that it hopes 
to increase its support for the 
advanced education of able 
minority persons interested in 
preparing for careers in 
college teaching. 

The Board of Trustees, after 
the staff gathered data and a 
study was made, adopted the 
following recomendations : 

1) that the Danforth, Kent, 
and Graduate Fellowships for 
Women be reorganized into 
one program— the Danforth 
Graduate Fellowship 
program; 

2) That the Danforth 
Graduate Fellowship 
Program offer approximately 
100 fellowships for graduate 
education annually, with 25 of 
these awards designated for 
American Indians, Blacks, 
Mexican-Americans, and 
Puerto Ricans; 

3) that approximately 6045 
of the 100 annual awards go to 
persons applying as college 
seniors and that the remaining 
35-40 awards go to post- 
bacculaureat persons; 

4) that preference be given 
among the early entry ap- 
plicants to persons under 30 
years of age and that per- 
ference be give among the late 
entry applicants to persons 30- 
40 years of age; 

5) that the Danforth 
Fellowships be given to 
persons committeed to 
careers in college and 
university teaching, in sub- 
ject-matter specializations 
likely to be taught in under- 
graduate liberal arts 
cirriculum, and for pursuit of 
the Ph.D. or other appropriate 
terminal degree at an ac- 
credited university of the 
Fellow's choice in the United 
States; 

6) that the Fellowships be 
for one year, with the 
possibility of renewel for a 
total of four years, the actual 
period of support to be worked 
out on an individual basis; 

7) that a Fellowship include 
tuition and fees plus a stipend; 

8) that graduating seniors 
be nominated by campus 
liaison officers and that 
postbaccalaureate persons 
make application directly to 
the Foundation; 

9) that the criteria for 
selection feature, in addition 
to an appropriate degree 
program and a commitment to 
teaching, dedication to a life of 
service informed by moral or 
ethical values; 

10) that the Foundation 
utilize unexpended Fellowship 
funds in any fiscal year for 
purposes of identifying, 



recruiting, and educating 
minority persons; 

These recommendations 
will be effective in the 1976-77 
academic year. The first 
appointees will enter their 
graduate study in the fall term 
of 1977. 

More than 50 persons, 
mainly from minorities, have 
participated in consultations 
held at varous locations 
around the nation. A study 
done on the status of 
minorities in higher 
education, showed there was a 
review of accomplishments of 
monority persons in Danforth- 
funded fellowship programs. 

Through various grants and 
programs the Foundations 
commitment to the needs and 
interests of persons form 
racial and ethnic minorities 
has been shown. Ap- 
proximately 20 percent of the 
resources expended through 
grants have in one way or 
another been directed to 
minorities. Ten percent of the 
awards in the last ten years 
have been given to persons 
from minorities, in the 
graduate fellowship programs 
administered by the Foun- 
dation. $6,000,000 has been 
granted to Southern 
Universities through the 
Southern Fellowships Fund of 
the Council 

Grants to various in- 
dividuals universities for 
minotiry fellowships have 
been received. In addition to 
continuing support for some of 
these activities, the Foun- 
dation will emphasize 
fellowships for persons from 
selected minotirites through 
the Danforth Graduate 
Fellowship Program. 

Recruitment activities have 

already started, coordinated 

by Dr. John Ervin, Dean of 

Continuing Education, 
Washington University, St. 

Louis, who has been appointed 

Advisor to the Foundation. 

The Danforth Foundation, 
established by the late Mr. 
and Mrs. William H. Danforth 
in 1927, is a national, 
educational, philanthropic 
organization, dedicated to 
enhancing the humane 
dimemsions of life. Activities 
of the Foundation emphasize 
the theme of improving the 
quality of teaching and 
learning. 

The Foundation serves the 
following areas: higher 
education nationally through 
sponsorship of Staff-admin- 
istered programs ; 
precollegiate education 
nationally through grant- 
making and program ac- 
tivities; and urban affairs in 
St. Louis through grant- 
making and program ac- 
tivities. 




PLACEMENT OFFICE— NSU's placement Office 
is one spot every senior should visit before his last 
lege is over. Placement helps students find jobs in 
any field. They can also aid a student in com- 
pleting a resume necessary for the placement 
files. 

Service benefits 
students 



The Placement Service is 
maintained by NSU for the 
benefit of its students and 
alumni. Many employers in 
business, industry, govern- 
ment, and the teaching 
profession visit the university 
for the purpose of recruiting 
personnel. The Placement 
Service arranges interviews 
for prospective graduates and 
alumni who wish to contact 
these employers. 

The Placement Service 
maintains a confidential file of 
candidates for positions which 
is made available to em- 
ployers. 

The Placement Service 
maintains a confidential file of 
candidates for positions which 
is made available to em- 
ployers upon request. All 

E — 



seniors should register with 
the service as soon as possible 
after the beginning of their 
senior year or at anytime 
thereafter. Seniors in the Coll- 
ege of Education are advised 
to register with the Placement 
Service as soon as their 
student teaching assignment 
has been made. 

The Placement Office also 
is involved in helping inter- 
national students from 20 
countries. International 
students, when they are fresh- 
men, are given a career 
orientation test to help build 
an interest in a career. 

The Placement Office is 
located in Caldwell Hall, and 
the employers would like for 
students to take advantage of 
it. 



, is a nation talking to itself. ' ' 
— Arthur Miller 



Do you realty 
know what 



Geologists visit Ark. 



Contest 
Slated 



NSU students are invited to 
participate in GLAMOUR 
Magazine's 1977 Top Ten 
College Women Contest. 
Young women from colleges 
and universities throughout 
the country will compete in 
GLAMOUR'S search for ten 
outstanding students. A panel 
of GLAMOUR editors will 
select the winners on the basis 
of their solid records of 
achievement in academic 
studies and-or in ex- 
tracurricular activities on 
campus or in the community. 

GLAMOUR'S Top Ten 
College Women Contest has 
evolved over the past twenty- 
one years along with the 
changing interests and con- 
cerns of college women. Ten 
years ago, this was a contest 
to select the best-dressed on 
campus, but since 1969, the 
emphasis has been on what 
college women have achieved. 

The 1977 Top Ten College 
Women will be featured in 
GLAMOUR'S August College 
Issue. During April, May or 
June, the ten winners will be 
invited to New York to meet 
the GLAMOUR staff and will 
receive a $500 cash prize. 

Anyone who is interested in 
entering the search should 
contact GLAMOUR 
Magazine, Conde Nast 
Building, 350 Madison Avenue, 
New York, N.Y., 10017 for 
more information. The 
deadline for submitting an 
application to GLAMOUR is 
February 15, 1977. 





oswnei 
business 
profits go up 
or down? 

If we citizens don't under- 
stand the basic workings 
of our American Econ- 
omic System, how can 
we make intelligent 
decisions about it? 

. Every American ought 
to know what this booklet 
says. It's easy to read, 
interesting— and free. For 

' a copy, write: "Economics 
Pueblo, Colorado 81009. 



The Geological Society 
recently embarked on a trip to 
the Little Missouri Falls in the 
Cossalot Mts. of Arkansas 
Quachita National Forest. A 
party from the University of 
Arkansas at Monticello joined 
the group. 

The members observed 
principle rock form such as 
the Arkansas Novaculite. The 



rocks are approximately 350 
million years old with some 
estimated to be as old as 470 
million years. Shales and 
sandstones were also 
examined. 

While observing the stream 
patterns, erosion, faulting and 
other techtonic activities Dr. 
David Dobbins of the NSU 
earth science department and 




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Dr. Rene Delton of the 
University of Arkansas gave 
students many pointers to help 
them understand what had 
caused the different 
geological phenomenon. 

The group visited rock 
outcrops near Bard Springs 
and Tall Peak. Persons who 
participated in the field trip 
were Don Webb, Butch Lee, 
and Thomas Bearden, all from 
NSU. Three students for the 
University of Ark. were also 
along. 

The Geological Society is 
currently planning to work for 
the Christmas Festival to 
finance an Easter trip. 
Anyone interested in joining 
the club should contact Dr. 
Dobbins for more information. 



NSU begins 
tradition 

"We are going to start a new 
tradition here at NSU," Bill 
Hochstetler, director of in- 
tramurals, announced last 
week. 

North western's independent 
and Greek flag football 
champions will play Northeast 
Louisiana's respective teams 
tommorrow in Harry "Rags" 
Turpin Stadium. The first 
game will kick-off at 7 : 30 p.m. 
with the second to follow at 
8:30 p.m. 

Couyon-6, our overall flag 
football intramural champs, 
and Kappa Sigma fraternity 
will represent Northwestern. 
Kappa Sigma will play Nor- 
theast's Kappa Sigma 
fraternity team. Couyon-8 will 
be challenging Northeast's 
independent champs who are 
to be decided in a game today. 

By working in conjunction 
with Camile Currier, the In- 
tramural Director at Nor- 
theast, Hochstetler says they 
hope to set up a similar 
competition in soft ball and 
basketball. 

The games are open to all 
students free of charge and 
Hochstetler and NSU Student 
Governemnt Associations who 
is helping to sponsor this new 
traditionihope the students 
will support this effort. 

Couyon-8 will travel to 
Louisiana State University in 
Baton Rouge later this month 
to compete in another contest 
of flag football supremacy. 



When you think 
of mens wear.... 
think of 



Caplan's 



Located next to Broadmoor Shopping Center 



MM M 



Three Columns 



Johnson attends 
meeting 

Joseph A. Johnson, 
associate professor of 
English, served as secretary 
of the Renaissance literature 
section at the South-Central 
Modern Language Association 
meeting last weekend in 
Dallas. 

The association's mem- 
bership is composed of 
colleges and universities in 
Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, 
Oklahoma, Tennessee and 
Mississippi. 

Johnson has presented and 
published papers in recent 
years on Edmund Spenser, 
John Donne and John Wilmot, 
Earl of Rochester. The 
Rochester paper was printed 
in England by "The Durham 
University Journal." 

Other faculty members 
from the Department of 
Languages who attended the 
meeting are Dr. Sara A. 
Burroughs, Neill D. Cameron, 
Dr. Joey L. Dillard, Mary 
Jean Doherty, Dr. Mary Nell 
Fletcher, Dr. Donald W. 
Hatley, Dr. Christine 
Pickering, William C. Robert 
and Lou Anna Thomas. 



The winning picture or 
design will be used on the 
cover of the Housing Direc- 
tory Brochure. The present 
design has been in use since 
1970. Gillis expressed deep 
concern for creativity in the 
work. Art entries must be 
original, Gillis said. 

Les Palmer, assistant 
director of housing said, "The 
cover design will aid in per- 
sonal feeling and inject a 
direct imput with the student, 
because it will be something 
they (the student) can relate 
to. 

A $10 prize will be awarded 
to the first place work. NSU 
Staff relations Committee 
members, consisting of two 
house directors and five 
R.A.'s will make the final 
selection. The art work or 
photo must be received no 
later than 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 
19. The design or photo must 
be complete with the name, 
address and phone number of 
the artist on 8 by 10 paper. 

No special style is required. 
It may be different, unique, 
yet must portray NSU and 
something that will attract 
and gain the attention of the 
students. 



Goodwin to teach 
new class 

A course entitled 
"Psychology of Women" will 
be offered during the spring 
semester by the Department 
of Behavioral Sciences 

The three-hour course is 
being offered on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays at 2:30 p.m. on the 
Natchitoches campus and on 
Mondays at 4:30 p.m. at the 
Shreveport campus. 

Instructor for the course 
will be Dr. Gail Goodwin, 
professor of behavioral 
science . Dr. Goodwin has 
conducted extensive research 
in the field of women's 
psychology. 

Areas to be explored in the 
course include psychological 
theory as it relates to women, 
role expectations at different 
stages of life, assertive 
training, history of the wome- 
n's movement, sex differences 
and vocational, educational 
and life goal's counseling, and 
self-esteem. 

Dr. Goodwin said both men 
and women are encouraged to 
enroll in the course. She said 
target groups who would 
benefit from the course are 
those interested in working in 
areas of women's develop- 
ment and guidance. Such 
groups include church, school, 
college, community agencies, 
personnel management, psy- 
chologists, ministers, social 
workers and women in search 
of avenues of development. 

"Clearly," said the NSU 
professor, "there is a need to 
enlarge the context within 
which the development of 
women is viewed, as there is 
an obvious lack of knowledge 
concerning the needs and 
expectancies of women." 

The instructor said the 
approach of the course will not 
be radical but will emphasize 
the developmental and self- 
actualizing potentialities of 
women. 

Housing sets 
contest 

The Department of Housing 
has announced an art and 
photo contest open to all 
students, according to Bar- 
bara Gillis, director of 
housing. 



CAMPUS 
REPRESENTATIVES 
WANTED 

Sell name brand 
HiFi components 
at discount prices 
in spare time. 
Write... 

Sound Savings 

18506 N.E. 5th Ave. 
N. Miami Beach, Fla. 33179 
(305) 652-7610 art: Mike 




Vol. L 





H||P 

w 



THE HAPPENING— 
Adrienne Bordelon and 
Mike McElwee are 
pictured here playing in 
a pile of brushes. 

Art 103 holds 
'Happening' 

What is THE HAP- 
PENING? 

No one knows for sure 
because the Art 103 class is 
being very tight-lipped about 
their project. 

Reliable sources have in- 
dicated that THE HAP- 
PENING will create an en- 
vironment that will assualt the 
viewer's senses and make him 
question his proconceived 
ideas about galleries and art 
in general. 

It is reported that THE 
HAPPENING will be located 
in the Gallery of the art 
department on the second 
floor of the Fine Arts Bldg. 

Non art majors will be 
caught in the act of making art 
and having fun with art. 

THE HAPPENDING will be 
on display from today through 
Friday. Come experience 
THE HAPPENING! 

Reed promoted 
to Colonel 

Lt. Col. Paul R. Reed, 
professor of military science 
and director of the ROTC was 
promoted to the rank of col- 
onel in the United States Army 
during ceremonies conducted 
this week at NSU. 

Reed becomes the first 
Army officer to achieve the 
rank of colonel while serving 
on active duty as director of 
the ROTC program which was 
established at the university 



more than 20 years ago. 

The promotion ceremonie, 
were conducted by Brig. Ge^ 
Gerald Childress, command^ 
of the Third ROTC Regi, 
headquarters at Ft. Riley 
Kan., who was assisted by 
Arnold R. Kilpatrick. NT ne*, 

Lt. Col. Paul R. Reej; 
professor of military scietic, 
and director of the ROTC 
promoted to the rank of ^ 
onel in the United States Anuj 
during ceremonies conduct^ 
this week at NSU. 

Reed becomes the fi^ 
Army officer to achieve tin 
rank of colonel while servinj 
on active duty as director $ 
the ROTC program which w« 
established at the universitj 
more than 20 years ago. 

The promotion ceremony 
were conducted by Brig. Gen, 
Gerald Childress, commandg 
of the Third ROTC Regi, 
headquarters at Ft. Riley, 
Kan., who was assisted by Dr. 
Arnold R. Kilpatrick. 

Officials from the Third 
ROTC Region who were in 
attendance included Lt. Col 
Robert Sellers, inspector 
general for region 
headquarters; Col. Edwatf 
Eckert, area commander fa 
Arkansas and Louisiana, and ' 
Sgt. Maj. John L. Morrison 

Reed began his assignment 
as ROTC director in the fall i 
1973, and in less than thre 
years under his leadership the 
military science program hat 
had a increase in its cadi 
enrollment of more than 80 pa 
cent. 

Reed's credits also includ 
the creation of the Velvet Kn 
ights— the university 1 
women's drill team— and to 
Devil's Disciples— a rang! 
platoon for special militai] 
training. . 

Under Reed's leadership, 
the university's James A 
Memorial Drill Meet 
each December has becom 
one of the nation's top 
petitions for high schi 
teams. 

Black Knights list 
plans 

by Steven Parson 
Plans are being made f« 
the upcoming James A. 
Memorial Meet to be held f 
Saturday, Dec. 4 by t» 
Department of Milita f/ 
Science. There will be 30 hijl 
school drill teams compete 
and the meet is scheduled! 
begin at 8 a. m. and last t±U 3p 
m. "The E 

Plans for the remainder 1 performa 
the semester for the Bl*< poetry m 
Knights include marching 1 Argus, 
Nov. 6th at Colfax in tbf fe{ 
annual Pecan Festivi Hong, waj 
Homecoming night, the * said Dr. ] 
team will form a corridor rjr uia 



the Homecoming Queen 



Tl 



Poets wl* 



her court. The last foo* Argus ar 
game of the season for " tholomev 
Demons has been design'JJ departme 
as Military Night by 
Military Science Departing J 
The Black Knights will P* 
form during the pre-g*5 
ceremonies, and after* 8 ' 1 
talk to young people in c0 
at NSU, and the area 
ROTC. 



Sociology Club & 
many plans 

Students can look forw*^ 1 
many exciting upcofl 1 ^ 
activities including a r»» 
car wash, nursing ^ 
program, Christmas party 
Honors tea. 

The Sociology Club 
membership of 48 student* 
this semester, including 
executive council: 
Migeres, president; ^ 
Armstrong, Vice-prei 
John McCall, 



Treasufj 
Sherry Gatlin, Secretary! 9 
Ball, projects chairman; ( 
Kim Rushing, 
chairman. Our sponsors 
Malcom Braudaway 
Roland Pippin. The club?" 
had a goat roast, sponso^ 
lecture by Dr. Harold KeT*° 
Southwestern Oklahoma 
University, and a aiin 1 ^ 
"We the Family" period* 



by the Professional Sod" 1 
Players. 



IS 



ars ago. 
i ceremonie, 
jy Brig. 
i, command, 
tOTC Regt ( 
: Ft. Rilej 
ssisted by 
rick. NT ne*, 
1 R. Re^ 
Litary sciaic, 
le ROTC w„ 
: rank of co| 
I States Artty 
ies conducte 
U. 

es the fin 
) achieve ft 
while servin 
is director 4 
im which waj 
he university 
;ars ago. 
1 ceremoniei 
by Brig. Gei 
s, command, 
*OTC Regi, 
t Ft. Riley, 
ssisted by Dr, 
itrick. 

1 the Third 
who were 
uded Lt. Col 
i, inspector 
r regioi 
Col. Edwart 
tmmander {« 
ouisiana, and 
L. Morrison 
is assignmeol 
)r in the fall < 
ss than thre 
leadership tlx 
i program hi 
> in its cad 
are than 60 pi 

s also includ 
the Velvet Ki 
university'! 
team— and H 
les— a ranjt 
lecial militai 



s leadei 
James A 
i Meet 
r has becoi 
ion's top 
igh schootoril 



URRENT SAUCE 




NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 



NATCHITOCHES. LOUISIANA 



November 16, 1976 



Winter performs 



SANDY SPOHN 



ights Jisl 



1 Parson 
ling made ft 
ames A. KM 
to be held 1 
c. 4 by 



Anonymous— 



Go to the house of hell ! 

Visit the horrors of the eons, 

Turn to the mirrors of images of mirages. 

Grasp the unreal and the fantastic. 

Dream of the things that can never be, 

TORMENTED!!! 

Join the thousands who endured the temptations of the 
demons; 

Follow those who make a hell for themselves in the present 
world. 

Learn the stigmata of the — 

TORMENTED!!! 

Go to the house of hell! 

Learn from what you hear and see, 

Beware of the — - 

TORMENTED!!! 

Live for a time in the house of hell. 

Live among the tormented, 

Learn, and beware of the 

SELF-TORMENTED! ! ! ! 

Anonymous 



From a disarray of musical in- 
struments came the unique sound of the 
Paul Winter Consort as they performed 
in concert a week ago in the Fine Arts 
Auditorium. 

Paul Winter explained a consort as a 
conversation. It is more than a stream 
of words. His group 

goes through a never ending process 
of exploring the abilities they have. 

In a workshop held earlier that af- 
ternoon, people explored ideas by 
sharing sounds together in a con- 
versational way, according to Winter. 

One of the numbers the consort 
performed that evening was a con- 
versation entitled "A Tuesday Night in 
Louisiana." It was a flowing series of 
duets; total improvisation except for 
the beginning dialogue. 

Paul Winter Consort, which per- 
formed at NSU three years ago, tends 
to take an element they like and use it 
as "the seed to grow a piece." They are 
fascinated with the sounds of animals 
because of "the message in the beauty 
of the communion of these creatures." 

One of the songs they performed, 
"Ocean Dream," used the song 
(defined by Winter as a "pattern repea- 



ted again and again") of the great blue 
whale to form the basis of the com- 
position. This performance began and 
ended with the whales singing in their 
natural environment — the ocean. 

Other selections the group performed 
were "Beginning a New Day," "Ballad 
in seven eighths" — variation on a 
theme from Bela Bartok, "Harvest 
Fair," Minuit," an African village song 
sung in the late of the evening, and 
"Whole Earth Chant." 

Some of the instruments introduced 
in the course of the evening were 
Buddish prayer bowls, Liberian split 
drums Sears & Roebuck mixing bowls, 
cellos, saxphones, guitars and 
keyboards. 

Members of the Paul Winter Consort 
are Paul Winter, David Darling, Robert 
Chappell, Tigger Benford, and Ben 
Carriel. 

The concert was sponsored by the 
Fine Arts Committee of the Student 
Union Governing Board. The com- 
mittee is chaired by Cynda Simmons. 
Serving with her are Mark Benge, 
Craig Kubic, John Nipp, Mary Stecha, 
and Victoria Tucker. 




PAUL WINTER CONSORT 



Election slated 



Happiness is a win 



by Bob Ryder 

Last weeks homecoming activities 
were capped off by an exciting win over 
USL by the Demons. 

The final score was 7-3. The game 
was played in a steady, cold rain, and 
both teams seemed to be slowed down 
by the weather. Sidney Thornton for 
NSU was the leading ground gainer of 
the game picking up 95 yards rushing. 

On Friday night of last week the 
homecoming court was presented at the 
Homecoming Dance, which was held in 
Prather Coliseum. Members of the 
court are: Tanya Allen, Lisa 
Breazeale, Brenda Causey, Helen 
Curmp, Carol Martin, Wanda Payadue, 
Nell Reed, and Jarja Wells. The NSU 
Homecoming Queen for 1976 is Sandy 
Spohn. Last year she served as queen 
for the State Fair Game in Shreveport 
against La. Tech. 



of Militar 
willbe30hi| 
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i remainder 



'The Eye Alone' makes debut 



by KEN LANDRY 

"The Eye Alone," an NSU theatrical 
performance featuring student written 



in 

light, the * 
a corridor * 



for the Bl» poetry made its debut last week. 
: inarching < A rgu S/ NSU's literary magazine 
blfax in tW which features student written selec- 
F ? st 'U aons ' was ^ inspiration for the play, 
said Dr. E. Robert Black, director. 
Dr. Black said, we took poetry from 
ng Queen ^ poets who had material published in 
- last foot" Argus and material from Dr. Bar- 
leason for « tholomew, head of the language 
en design*" department, Robert Lockwood, who is 
Slight by * 
:e Departm*" 
Ights will t 
the pre**" 
nd after**' 
;ople in c# 
he area 



Club *" 

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00k forward' 
ig upcon 11 " 
ding a 
ursing &" 
tmas party 



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48 student*^ 

including 9 
uncil: JJ 
sident; 
fice-presi 
, TreasiKj 
Secretary; * 
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g> pubUj 

sponsors 
udaway *. 

The clutj 
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aroldKertJ' 
klahoma Sfi 
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from out of state, and members of the 
speech faculty. 

The play was presented in the form of 
a reading theater "In order to realize 
the original purpose of the poet," said 
Dr. Black. The material was read out 
loud and in a fashion which was to have 
been theatrically interesting, he added. 

According to Dr. Black the play was 
to appeal to the ey as much as the ear. 
To achieve this slides, projections, 



sound, music and stage lighting was 
used to supplement the material. 

Voices to create the special sound 
affects had at times one, two, three, and 
25 performers speaking at one time. 

The cast included students from Dr. 
Black's oral interpretation class and 
faculty members Daniel Keyser, Ray 
Schexnider, and Dr. Black. 

The reading theater was the "First 
major experiment on campus in a 
number of years," Dr. Black said. 



Scheduled in conjunction with 
Homecoming was the 10th anniversary 
reunion of the university's undefeated 
football team of 1966. The team had a 9- 
record, won the Gulf States Con- 
ference championship and was ranked 
No. 1 in the nation by the National 
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. 

Jack Clayton, who coached the 1966 
team, was guest speaker during the 
Alumni Dinner Saturday in the Student 
Union Ballroom, and members of the 
undefeated squad will be recognized at 
the banquet. Tribute was also paid to 
the 1966 team during half time of the 
game. 

Another highlight of half time was the 
induction of three former NSU athletes 
into the university's Athletic Hall of 
Fame. The inductees were Jim Willis, 
Don Guidry, and Jimmy Leach. They 
were honored at a reception in the N 
Club Room at Prather Coliseum at 4 p. 
m Saturday. 

Other activities last week included a 
pep rally held by the cheerleaders at 
the Bunker Club. After the pep rally 
Thursday, several cases of beer were 
available for students. The cases were 
donated by Shamrock Discount Liquor, 
Rapides Grocery, Natchitoches 
Beverage, and Mid-State Beer. 

Also on Saturday, an open house was 
held in campus residence halls 
academic departments, sorority and 
fraternity houses, and other parts of the 
campus. 



Elections for the Mr. and Miss NSU 
titles will be held Wednesday, Nov. 17 in 
the Student Union Lobby on the second 
floor. The polls will be open from 8 a.m. 
to 7 p.m. IDs are required to enable one 
to exercise his right to vote. 

Running for Mr. NSU are Stan 
Haynes, Marvin Roque, Hilton Verrett, 
Rodney Wise and Stuart Wright. 
Candidates for Miss NSU are Spring 



Cloud, Donna King and Sharon Mack. 

The winners of the coveted Mr. and 
Miss NSU titles will be kept secret until 
the night of the Christmas Lights 
concert, Saturday, Dec. 4. 

If a run-off election is necessary, it 
will be held December 1. 

Pictures and resumes of each can- 
didate will be available at the polls for 
the voters' information. 



Contest underway 



by Bob Ryder 

It's getting close to that special time 
of year again—Christmas is just around 
the corner! 

At Northwestern, no Christmas would 
be complete without the painted win- 
dows at the Student Union Building. 

For this reason, the Student Union 
Governing Board, (SUGB) is spon- 
soring its annual Christmas Window 
Painting Contest. 

Letters were sent out to all campus 
organizations with a list of rules and an 
entry form. 

The rules are as follows: 

1. All windows must be painted on the 
outside instead of the inside of the 
windows. Please be careful with 
painting the windows. 

2. No black or any other dark colored 
paint may be used. Dark colors draw 
heat and cause the windows to break. 

3. The windows to be decorated will 
be numerically designated. This 
number will designate which will be 
painted by that organization. 



4. All painting must be done with 
tempera or other water removable 
paints so that windows may be cleaned 
easily after Christmas. 

5. The symbols, letter or name of the 
organization may not appear on the 
window. After judging, the Union Board 
will place a poster on each window, 
giving the name of the 
rgaiiization. 

6. Painting can begin on the windows 
on Nov. 29. 

7. All painting must be completed no 
later than 4 p.m., Friday Dec. 3. 

8. Organizations are responsible for 
having a representative present at the 
Christmas lights concert, Dec. 4, 1976, 
awards will be presented at that time. 

9. Submit a sketch to Student Union 
office 214 before Nov. 18. 

10. Prizes are: First place— $50, 
Second place— $25, and Third Place — 
$15. 

Entries will be judged on originality, 
neatness, use of color, and appeal. 




'THE EYE ALONE' 



Special Day 



The Annual University Business Day 
program will be held this Thursday in 
the Student Union. The program will 
begin with a welcome in the Student 
Union Ballroom from 9-9:30 a. m., with 
a tour and program for visiting 
businessmen to follow during the 
remainder of the morning. 

A luncheon will be held in the 
ballroom from 11:30 a. m.-l p. m. with 
guest speaker for the event being 
General Thomas Bowen of Fort Polk. 



Movie 

An educational motion picture, 
James Thurber's "The Night the Ghost 
Got In" will be shown tomorrow at 7:30 
p.m. in room 215-A of the Eugene P. 
Watson Memorial Library. 

The film is part of a projected 
program of short educational films to 
be offered to NSU students. 




Homecoming 



HOMECOMING COURT-This group 
of girls reigned over last weeks 
homecoming activities. The queen was 
named at the Homecoming dance 
Friday night. 



Page 2 CURRENT SAUCE November 16, 1976 



Co 's Corner 



Today I will resume my 
introductions and complete 
the task I undertook last week 
— acquainting our readership 
with the staff. 

Mark Bandy, our business 
manager, is a tall drink of 
water with a good sense of 
humor. Mark is preparing to 
leave the staff in December 
when he walks up to receive 
his diploma. Mark keeps the 
money records for the 
publication and we are going 
to miss him, but wish him the 
best of luck. 

One of the friendliest young 
men on campus works for the 
CURRENT SAUCE as cir- 
culation manager. Rodney 
Wise, a pre-med major, is a 
jovial person who is always 
willing to lend a helping hand 
no matter what the task. He 
once served the publication as 
advertising manager. 

Three 'amiable guys help 
Rodney with circulating the 
paper on campus — Dale Niels, 

Chuck Cason and Joe Boyd. 
Rodney and his crew keep the 
staff in stitches with their 
numerous antics and stunts. 

The CURRENT SAUCE has 
two photographers and a 
cartoonist who add another 
dimension to the newspaper 
and add to the readers' en- 
joyment. Fair Hyams and 
Mike Rabalais pick up their 
assignments every week with 
a look of askance on their 
faces. They never cease to be 
amazed at some of the unusual 
pictures they have to take. 

Craig Berthold, our car- 
toonist, has come up with 
some very interesting car- 
toons for some of the very 
vague ideas we have had. The 



cover of the State Fair tabloid 
was designed by him, giving 
him another chance to 
demonstrate his talent. 

Mr. Presson, affectionately 
known among the staff as "the 
little man," is our adviser. 
Without Mr. Presson's 
guidance, there are times I 
feel that the paper would 
never have gotten to press. 

He smoothes out all our 
problems, listens to us rave 
and rant about some of the 
most ridiculous things and 
gives us fatherly advice. "The 
little man" may be short in 
stature, but he has a heartwith 
a place for each of us. No 
matter how disgusted and 
discouraged we get, Mr. 
Presson is always there with a 
smile and a cheerful word. 

Last, but not least, is the 
editor. As I said earlier in the 
semester, my name is Colette 
Oldmixon and friends call me 
Co. Let me tell you a little of 
my background. 

I am the oldest of thirteen 
with ten brothers and two 
sisters, ages ranging from 20 
to four years. I have two of the 
best parents a person could 
ever hope to have. My family 
lives on 80 acres of rolling hill 
land just outside Poplarville, 
Mississippi. 

I am a journalism major 
with a second major in 
history. I would like to begin 
my career on a fairly good size 
daily newspaper and move on 
to a large Metropolitan daily. 
Magazine layout and some 
book publishing figure highly 
in my career plans. When I 
retire I would like to teach 
history on the collegiate level 
at a small junior college. 



Now that you have met the 
CURRENT SAUCE staff, I 
hope, oh, I forgot to tell you 
about seven reporters who 
glean the campus for the news 
which goes into the paper. 

The members of the 
Journalism 252 class are 
responsible for covering their 
beats and any additional 
assignments they may draw 
during the week. They are 
Charlene Blume, Marvin 
Horton, Ken Landry, Steve 
Parsons, Bob Rash, Muffett 
Richardson and Stan Tyler. 

******** 
********* 

Tomorrow night a new Miss 
Northwestern Lady of the 
Bracelet will be selected from 
a field of 20 beauties. I would 
like to give you a behind the 
scene look at some of the 
people who helped put the 
production together. 

The theme of the pageant 
"Imagine" was suggested by 
Cheryl Purcell the current 
titleholder. She designed the 
stage the girls will perform 
on. Cheryl put many long and, 
at times, frustrating hours 
into the creation of a set which 
compliments the girls and the 
theme. 

Betty Williamson, the 
executive director of the 
pageant, is a jack of all trades 
and a walking encyclopedia on 
pageants. She oversees every 
move that is made and an- 
swers every question that is 
put to her by contestants and 
pageant workers. No matter 
how harried she is nor what 
mood she is in, she has time 
and encouragement for all. 
Her greatest satisfaction 



comes when someone gets 
their song or dance just right 
or figures out their problem 
and says ' thanks." 

Ann Bates and Darleen 
Damico, the assistant 
directors, are the gophers — 
They go for this and they go 
for that. They serve as fill-ins 
for dance lines, as the 
telephone committee, and do 
all other types of jobs. 

Judy Gremillion worked out 
this year's program, learning 
magazine layout and picture 
cropping in a day. Donna 
Brumley handled on campus 
publicity and Jim Johnson 
saw to the off-campus 
publicity. 

Debbie Bose, after spending 
one hectic afternoon on the 
phone, managed to sweet talk 
five agreeable people into 
judging the pageant. Glenda 
LaCaze made the 
arrangements for visiting 
queens. 

One of the hardest jobs 
tomorrow night will be that of 
stage manager. Leigh Perkins 
will have the time honored 
task of getting props off and on 
at the proper time, seeing that 
mikes are turned off and on, 
keeping the contestants quiet, 
and a host of other picky 
details. Leigh and his crew 
will also have to see that the 
Raggedy Ann dolls are not 
scattered all over the stage. 

Others who have worked to 
make this pageant a success 
are Malcolm Lanius and Joe 
Cotton, accompanists, Daniel 
Keyser, lights and stage; and 
Mrs. Wilson, Mrs. Lyons, 
Becky Nix, Debbie Hebert, 
and Vickie Procell — general 
support, encouragement, and 
a shoulder to cry on. The 
members of the SUGB also 
have done their part. 




I Who invented the telephone? 
A. Billy Graham. B. Alexander Gra- 
ham Belt C. Graham Cracker. 

2 True or false. You can save up to 
60% during the week when you 
dial long distance the 1 + way before 
an 8 a.m. class instead of after. 

3 What city has more telephones 
than people? A. New York N. Y, 
B. Copenhagen, Denmark. C. Wash- 
ington, D.C. 



4 



Dialing 1 + long distance calls 
out of state after 11 p.m. costs 
or less for the first minute. 



(That's for out-of-state calls within the 
continental U.S.A., of course.) A. 21$ 
B. $1.48 C. $76.53. Each additional 

minute costs no more than 

A.$U8B. 16<t C75<t. 



5 At 5:00 Sunday afternoon, rates 
for dialing 1 + calls: A. Go up. 
B. Go down. C. Stay the same. 

6 One Plus dialing means: A You 
dial 1, plus the area code, if dif- 
ferent from your own, plus the num- 
ber to call long distance. B. You add 
up all the digits in a phone number 
and divide by 4.3. The total eguals 
twice your age, plus one. 

7 When is the very cheapest time 
to dial a 1+ call? A. From 11 p.m. 
to 8 a.m. B. All weekend until 5 p.m. 
on Sunday. C. Weekdays, 8-5. • 

South Central Bell's special 
student information kit is full of details 
on lots of ways you can save yourself 
some money when you call long dis- 
tance. Play it smart and study it hard. 
The facts are really worth knowing! 




South Central Bell 



THE HAPPENING 




Readers comment 



Dear Editor, 

The Beer Issue 

Getting to the point— I feel I 
have been deprived from my 
rights to the First Amendment 
of the U.S. Amendment of the 
U.S. Constitution. 

After reading in the 
CURRENT SAUCE and 
hearing the beer issue 
Tuesday after Tuesday, I was 
avere to write to the Editor 
expressing my viewpoints to 
Kilpatrick as well as the 
students and staff. 

To the verity— religion has 
put their foot over this campus 
as well as the U.S. Govern- 
ment. Why? First, let me say 
even though I am completely 
against the Blue Laws 
because it violates the 14th 
Amendment in which it for- 
bids the states to deprive 
anyone from life, liberty, or 



property without "due process 
of law," including religious 
guarantees applied to the 
federal government of the 
First Amendment. The First 
Amendment provides 
government shall make no law 
respecting an establishment 
of religion. Even though the 
state can not set up a church, 
or aid a religion or force or 
influence a person to go or 
remain from a church against 
his own will. Blue laws are left 
to the state. 

Since Natchitoches is not a 
dry parish, I feel my rights 
have been taken away ac- 
cording to the First Amend- 
ment. I have the right to 
choose my own religion, but 
that right has been taken 
away from me. The city 
council was in favor for beer 



on campus, but Kilpatrick was 
against it. If Natchitoches is 
not a dry parish, then why 
should NSU be dry? 

I feel the religious 
organizations on campus of 
NSU has taken lead over my 
rights. Due to my religions 
that does not permit beer 
drinking, there are other 
religions that do permit it. Do 
I have the right to my own 
religion on this campus— NO! 
The main standpoint I am 
trying to express is that 
regardless of what religion, 
religion should not be an issue 
for beer drinking. It is a 
violation of the U.S. Con- 
stitution. Even though culture 
dictates generation after 
generation, you are not going 



to have one basic religtoi 
Having no beer on campus 
not going to change anyone] 
ways. It is not going to lead! 
socialized maturity of 
students as Carl Rogers, a 
American shall o 
psychologist would say. The 
are people who are different 
having different religions 
beliefs as well as gods. Bee 
drinking on campus is k 
bidden on campus due ! 
religion. Why escape fr« 
that phenomenon? 

I feel this has not bee 
brought out by any student 
who wrote or works for tk> 
SUGB, SBA, or anyone in tb 
CURRENT SAUCE. 

Elaine Basted; 



ta'v-i : V-9 -V-9 -ffV-t v>-£ : a-i I :si»msnv 



Current Sauce 



COLETTE OLDMIXON 
Editor 



BOB RYDER 
Managing Editor 



BILL BOSSIEF 
Sports Editor 



PAULA JETTON 
News Editor 



OLU AKINRINADE 
Assistant News Editor 

MARK BANDY 
Business Manager 

RODNEY WISE 
Circulation Manager 



RONALD BUZZETTA 
Assistant News Editor 

MARK SMITH 
Advertising Manager 

CRAIG BERTHOLD 
Cartoonist 



MIKE RABALAIS FAIR HYAMS 

Photographers 

FRANKLIN PRESSON 
Adviser 

Reporters— Muff et Richardson, Marvin Horton, Bob Rash 
Steve Parsons, Stan Tyler, Charlene Blume, and Ken Landry 





FREEDOM 

OF THE PRESS 



Current Sauce is the official publication of the stoSent body of 
Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, Louisiana. The 
newspaper is entered as second class matter at the Natchitoches Post 
Office under an act of March 3, 1879. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday during thefall and spring 
semesters with the exception of holidays and testing periods and b 
weekly during the summer semester, 1 1 is printed at the Natchitoches 
Times, Highway 1 South, Natchitoches, Louisiana. 

Editorial offices are located in Room 225, Arts and Sciences 
Building and telephones are 357-5456 and 357 6874, Business. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are solely those of the 
student editors and do not necessarily represent the viewpoint of the 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body of Northwestern. 

Letters to the editor are invited and contributions are solicited fro 
students, faculty, and staff and from student organizations. Letters 
must be signed and no more than 500 words to be considered fo 
publication. Names will be withheld upon request. 

The staff of Current Sauce reserves the right to edit all letters fo 
lake of journalistic style and available space. 



SGA 

at a glance 



November 8, 1976 

The Senate of Northwestern 
was brought to order by Bob 
Ryder at 6:35 p.m., November 
8, 1976. Absent was Roque and 
McKinney. 

C. Davis discussed the Legal 
Aid contract. Walker reported 
on Student Services and 
discussed bookstore prices 
and unsanitary cafeteria 
conditions. Haynes reported 
that we would have voting 
machines for Mr. and Miss 
NSU elections and announced 
plans for Homecoming pep 
rally. McKellar reported that 
the Committee on Committees 
structure had cut committees 
from 14 to nine and that a full 
report will be presented at 
next meeting. Lynch an- 
nounced concert Tuesday. 



OLD BUSINESS 

Downs discussed last weeM 
emergency bill about in 
tramural winners playin 
Tech's winners, and that <f> 
intramural winner would b 
playing Northeast's instead 

Johnson moved to providf 
$60.00 round trip to provi* 
funds for Couyon's trip 11 
Northeast. Lane seconded, If 
passed. 

NEW BUSINESS 

Dyess moved to accep 
election results ^ 
Homecoming Court, W' s 
seconded, motion passed 

Johnson moved to adjou" 
Nugent seconded. MeetW 
adjourned at 6:50 p.m 

Respectfully submit^ 
Debbie PX 
Senate 



let the 

testants w 
number of 
tavenothin 



3 



ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS OF NS 

The first 15 students who move into 
White Columns Apartments during the 
month of November, signing a lease 
for the second semester, will receive 
ten dollars off their rent for ten 
consecutive months. Plus, there 
will be no rent charged during the 
Christmas vacation. 

The Management 
White Columns Apartments 

352-3131 

4 



November 16, 1976 CURRENT SAUCE Page 3 



Greek Review - 



AǤ A 



Exchange aids students 




THETACHI 

The Eta Omicron chapter of 
Theta Chi fraternity is pleased 
to announce the pledging of 
Richy Duboise. 

This past weekend, Eta 
Omicron traveled to Leesville 
to participate in its annual 
work weekend for the Lion's 
Cripple Children's Camp. The 
two major projects were the 
building of a fence and the 
digging of a drainage ditch. 
All who went did a fine job and 
had a pleasurable time at the 
bonfire Saturday night. 

This past week, a field 
representative from the 
national office came to inspect 
the chapter's progress. A 
favorable report has been 
issued by the field 
representative Anton C. 
Krucky. All believe that Eta 
Omicron chapter is on its way 
to becoming a strong chapter 
at NSU once again. 

» KAPPA SIGMA 

Congratulations are in order 



to the Spring Pledge Class of 
Theta Mu chapter. Initiation 
ceremony was held October 20 
for Thomas Roger Williams, 
John Eric McKellar, Robert 
Lane Pittard, James Allen 
Villard, and Emmitt Alison 
Scott, Jr. The new actives 
would like to thank their 
Pledge trainers Randy 
Wiggins and Jay Worley for 
all their help. 

It was a busy week last week 
for the Sigs beginning with 
painting the house Tuesday, 
putting down new carpet 
Thursday and getting new 
furniture Friday. Friday night 
a big brother-little brother 
party was held at Jack 
Brittan's camp. The kegs of 
beer and brotherhood made it 
a great success. Saturday an 
open house was held with 
many alumni attending. 
Saturday night after the 
game, a dance was held at the 
Jaycee Hall with music 
provided by Road House. 



In intramural activity last 
week the Sigs won two volley- 
ball games against TKE and 
KA. Since the Southern boys 
have nothing planned for 
December 3, we invite them 
along with the rest of the 
campus to see the annual 
Charity Bowl. We will play the 
men of Sigma Tau Gamma. 
Our respects to the men of Sig 
Tau who agreed to play us 
after our first opponents (KA) 
backed out in playing us. 

SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 
The Alpha Zeta chapter 
recently nominated officers 
for the 1977 year. Those 
nominated will be elected next 
week. 

The entire chapter met with 
our NCC advisor Karen 
Jackson, Wednesday night to 
talk about Rush plans and the 
sorority. She also talked with 
the officers and the 
Panhellenic delegates about 
the Panhellenic Council. We 



were glad to have Karen with 
us at Northwestern. 

The Sigma volleyball team 
is still going strong as they 
defeated Delta Zeta Tuesday 
night during intramurals 

Tri Sigma congratulates all 
the girls selected to the 1976 
Homecoming Court and 
especially to Sandy and Lisa ! 

Gina Dobson was featured 
at a Big-Sis, 'Lil-Sis party last 
Thursday night when she 
found out her Big Sister, Liz 
Trudel. 

Tri Sigma held an open 
house for all the alumni's and 
parents attending Nor- 
thwestern's Homecoming 
Saturday on Greek Hill. 

DELTA ZETA 

Delta Zeta participated in 
several intramural sports this 
week. We played Sigma 
Kappa, Tri Sigma and Phi Mu 
in volleyball. Jennifer Karr 
and Anne Manson par- 



State beauties appear at LOB 



Miss Louisiana World and 
nine other reigning queens 
from throughout the state will 
appear at the Lady of the 
Bracelet beauty pageant Nov. 
17 in A.A. Fredericks Fine 
Arts Center Auditorium. 

The reigning Miss Louisiana 
World is Robbie Downing, a 19 
year old licensed real estate 
agent in New Orleans. Her 
father, Dudley Downing, was 
an all-American football 
player at NSU in 1954. 

Other beauty queens who 
will be appearing in the 
pageant sponsored by the 
Student Union Governing 
Board are Lisa Green, Miss 
Sabine Parish; Melva Jean 
Terrell, Miss Louisiana 



College; Trudy Wiggins, 
North Louisiana Paperland 
Queen; Jessica Barkas, Miss 
Minden; Connie Yvonne 
Williams, Miss Claiborne 
Parish; Susie Frank Parker, 
Miss Shreveport; Debbie 
Crew, Miss Ouchita Parish; 
Lisa Southerland, Miss Merry 
Christmas and Natchitoches 
Junior Miss, and Colette 
Juneau, Miss Bossier Parish 
Community College. 

Miss Terrell, a junior pre- 
law and music major at Louis- 
iana College, was the 
preliminary talent winner and 
second runner up in the Miss 
Louisiana Pageant last 
summer in Monroe. Her talent 
presentation was a piano solo 



entitled "Autumn Leaves." 

The reigning Miss North 
Louisiana Paperland, Trudy 
Wiggins made the top 10 at the- 
state pageant. Another Miss 
Louisiana pageant semi- 
finalist who will be appearing 
at the beauty contest is Miss 
Ouachita Parish, Debbie 
Crew. 

NSU's Lady of the Bracelet 
pageant, which is scheduled 
for 7:30 p.m., is an official 
preliminary to the Miss 
Louisiana and Miss America 
contests. The reigning Miss 

NSU is Cheryl Purcell. 

Twenty coeds will be 
competing this year for the 
title of Miss Northwestern. 
The pageant semi-finals will 
be conducted Nov. 16 to select 



the 10 students who will 
compete in the finals on 
Wednesday night. 

Our 

American 
Economic 
System is 
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LET THE SUN SHINE— These LOB con- 
testants work on the opening production 
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young girls compete for the coveted beautv 
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ticipated in the Rifle Shoot. 
Several girls played in the 
handball games. 

Delta Zeta attended the 
Panhellenic Picnic Wed- 
nesday behind Iberville 
Cafeteria. 

The Kappa Sigma pledges 
and the DZ pledges held an 
exchange at Jack Brittan's 
camp and had a fantastic 
time. Thanks, Guys! 

Some of the actives crashed 
the alumni meeting after the 
volleyball game Tuesday 
night. Margo Hoase was 
elected president and Donna 
Breeden was elected 
secretary treasurer. 

Delta Zeta made a display 
for Homecoming this last 
weekend and is now working 
on their booth for the 
Christmas Lights festivities. 

Congratulations to Suzette 
Tujager for being Theta Chi 
sweetheart and to Carrie Yore 
for being pledge of the week. 

Tri Beta 
takes a trip 

The excitement of life was 
revived within thirty Tri-Beta 
members last weekend as 
they took a two day trip to 
Arkansas. Backpacking, 
hiking, and camping were on 
the agenda for this escapade. 
The sights and sounds of 
autumn in the mountainous 
terrain provided an adequate 
escape from the hectic routine 
and the majority of the group 
was tempted not to return. 

The group's meeting was 
held Nov. 11. A service project 
at the Caroline Dorman 
Nature Reserve is still being 
planned for this semester. 



A positive self-concept will 
enable you to help others, said 
students of Louisiana Tech 
and NSU Staff Relation Ex- 
change Committee, in a 
workshop held here Nov. 11 
and 12., in the Student Union. 

The two universities met to 
establish a stronger 
relationship and exchange 
ideas about the two univer- 
sities housing department; 
however, this committee is 
trying to take a closer look at 
the demands of the students, 
in order to handle new, and old 
problems with more un- 
derstanding, according to 
Gary Brown, R.A. of NSU. 

"We are trying to assist the 



students by making their 
dorm experience as 
educational and as 
meaningful as possible, "said 
Cliff Colia , graduate assistant 
and house director at 
Louisiana Tech. 

The planning process of the 
exchange committee will 
affect the students today and 
aid the students of NSU of 
tomorrow, said Les Palmer 
assistant director of housing. 

The group met in a two 
session workshop held at 9 
a.m. and again at 2 p.m. in the 
Student Union. Barbara Gillis, 
director of housing, and 
Palmer president over the 
nine member committee. 




Four of the students 
represented Louisiana Tech 
and the remaining five were 
from NSU. 

The members from La. 
Tech are Cliff Colia, house 
director; Robert Farby , 
R.A.; Barbara Hinsworth 
R.A. and Kathy Bowman, 
president of Women resident 
halls. The NSU members are 
Stephanie Davitt, Valerie 
Scarbro; Julio Toro, Debbie 
Rodriguez, and Gary Brown. 

These members from NSU, 
journeyed to La. Tech on Oct. 
9 and 10 for a brief exchange 
workshop. Another seminar is 
in the planning stages, and La. 
Tech president's camp is a 
tentative site for the exchange 
committee gathering. This 
assembly will include about 50 
R.A.'s and house directors 
from both schools. 




the 

older generation 
has a lot of stuffy 
ideas.- 
cigarette 
smoking is one! 



PLEASE JOIN US— Charlene (Twiggy) Miller, Nell Reed, 
Jaree Sherrer, and their seated friends Cindy Black and 
Edith M. Harris would like all the students, faculty and staff 
of NSU to attend the Lady of the Bracelet pageant. These five 
semifinalists and the other 15 girls will help you "Imagine" 
who the next Miss Northwestern Lady of the Bracelet will be. 



American 
Cancer Society 




Now comes Miller time 



-3 CO UllwiykM a 



NATCHITOCHES BEVERAGE INC. 




Pa ge 4 CURRENT SAUCE November 16. i 



Thirteen leads to best year of my life 



Special to CURRENT SAUCE 
j by Cheryl Pureed 

I'd always thought the 
number 13 was unlucky; 
however, it proved just the 
opposite for me. With that 
number pinned on my gown, I 
was crowned Miss Nor- 
thwestern Lady of the 
Bracelet 1975-76. 

w 

It is hard to believe a whole 
year has passed since that 
: day. This past year has been 
unbelievably fantastic for me 
and I've secretly dreaded its 
end. 

However, tomorrow night 
I will relinquish my crown and 
pass my title on to some other 
lucky girl. 

If someone had told me I 
would someday be Miss 
Northwestern, I certainly 
would not have believed them. 
It all started with a floor 
meeting in Louisiana Hall. 

When my friends nominated 
me, I didn't take it very 
seriously. Me— in a pageant? 
I'd never been in one before 
and I really didn't know what 
to do. I hesitantly attended the 
first meetings and much to my 
surprise, I began to enjoy 



working with LOB. The ex- 
citement mounted as we, the 
contestants, prepared for 
preliminary competition. This 
included talent and interview 
and I doubt anyone was more 
frightened than I. 

Getting my talent together 
was a problem and if any of 
you have seen me perform, 
you will certainly agree it is 
quite "unique." After ruling 
out singing and dancing, my 
art instructor, Mr. Rector, 
mentioned an art presentation 
idea and it seemed workable. 

Being an art major, I was 
elated to have a talent to work 
with since I do consider art my 
talent. The presentation he 
suggested was a "wax resist" 
painting. 

For those of you who are not 
familiar with art terms, I will 
explain the really simple 
process. What happens if a 
white crayon is scribbled on a 
white piece of paper and then 
black ink is applied over it? 

The wax in the crayon 
"resists" the ink and those 
areas treated with crayon 
remain white, while the un- 
treated areas absorb the ink. 



Viola! A black and white 
painting : 

This is the same principal I 
used except that ordinary 
household candles are used 
instead of crayon and black 
tempra paint is used instead of 
ink. 

When I go on stage, I have 
already drawn my picture 
with candles, so all there is 
left to do is paint over it. As 
you can see, there are no 
tricks involved and I have 
done every bit of work requi- 
red for its creation. 

Deciding on subject matter 
and coordinating music was 
next. Thanks to 
Dr. Roberts and Mr. Thorn, 
two of my art instructors, 
things started falling in place. 

I chose "Love is Blue" by the 
Mystic Moods Orchestra and 
the scene to be painted would 
be a rainy street scene. 

With 

Dr. Roberts's sewing talent, 
my costume was ready to go- 
complete with artist's smock 
and beret! 

Even though I shook with 
nervousness during 
preliminaries, somehow I 




| CHERYL PURCELL PRESENTS HER CREATION "STORMY WEEKEND' 



made the semi-finalists. With 
a scant three weeks to work, 
we prepared for the final 
pageant. 

Those three weeks were a 
whirlwind of rehearsals and 
getting it all together, not to 
mention attending classes and 
taking tests! 

Another set of preliminaries 
were held for the judges to 
determine top ten. I was 
scheduled to perform my 
talent in 15 minutes when I 
realized I had left, in my 
room, the large sheet of 
plastic needed to protect the 
floor from paint. Attired 
completely in my brief green 
satin smock and beret, I tore 
across campus to my dorm to 
get the plastic, not to mention 
the curious stares I got also. 
Somehow, some way, I made 
it through that episode. 

The night of November 18 
finally came and I had no idea 
that at the end of the night I 
would be crowned the new 
Miss Northwestern. This news 
was received with pride by my 
parents and with disbelief by 
my younger brother. 

The year that followed was 
one of excitement and ac- 
tivities. My first "ap- 
pearance" was riding in the 
Christmas parade atop a float 
in 30 degree weather. I think it 
took me two days to thaw out. 

The spring semester 
brought many invitations to 
other pageants, requesting I 
attend as a visiting queen. The 
Miss Northeast pageant was 
my first and here I learned 
quickly to supress my fear and 
nervousness. At the Miss 
Minden pageant I met Bert 
Jones, quarterback for the 
Baltimore Colts. Oh, I might 
add that he is 23 and eligible ! I 
was also fortunate to meet 
Cajun comedian Justin Wilson 
at the Miss Claiborne Parish 
pageant. 

Not all of my visits to other 
pageants were filled with 
meeting exciting per- 
sonalities. I have had a few 



disasters. At the Miss Sabine 
Pageant, I met a policeman, 
but not in the best manner. In 
front of the motel where I was 
staying, I backed up into the 
maid's car. Luckily, both the 
policeman and the maid un- 
derstood my shower of tears 
and were very nice about the 
incident. Too bad my dad 
wasn't so understanding! 

My worst disaster came at 
the worst possible place — the 
Miss Tech pageant. I was the 
first queen to walk on stage 
and I proceeded to do so at the 
cue from one of the stage 
hands. I was very em- 
barrassed to find out as I stood 
there in the middle of the 
stage, smiling, that the 
Master of ceremonies hadn't 
even begun to introduce me. 
When I heard a chuckle arise 
from the audience, I calmly 
turned, walked off and cried. 
It was more embarrassing to 
have to walk right back out 
again,— and yes, I did walk out 
at the right time! 

Miss Northwestern is the 
official hostess of NSU and on 
several occasions I have 
welcomed alumni and special 
visitors. Miss Northwestern is 
also NSU's entry into the Miss 
Louisiana pageant. Our LOB 
pageant is an official Miss 
America preliminary. Our 
winner goes to Miss Louisiana 
and the winner there goes to 
represent the state in the Miss 
America pageant. 

The highlight of my reign 
was participating in the Miss 
Louisiana pageant in Monroe 
this summer. I spent four days 
there, with three nights of 
competition. On the final 
night, the ten finalists were 
announced and I was ecstatic 
when my name was called! 
This was the first time the 
Miss Northwestern entry 
made the finalists and I was so 
very proud to be that "first!" 

Besides being a lot of hard 
work, tension, and tears the 
Miss Louisiana pageant was a 
lot of fun. My chaperone, Mrs. 
Joe Prather was very 



dependable and helpful— not 
to mention humorous. One 
night after competition, I 
came back to our room and 
with a sigh of relief, peeled off 
my false eyelashes and laid 
them on the bed. I left for a 
moment and when I returned, 
Mrs. Prather was leaning 
cautiously over the bed, gently 
prodding my lashes that had 
stuck together. And in her 
Portugese accent she ex- 
claimed, "Cheryl, look at dees 
♦funny bugs!" without her 
there to help, encourage, and 
make things easier for me, I 
doubt if I would've done as 
well as I did. 

There have been many 
people who have helped me 
and I could never express my 
gratitude enough. Some have 
been mentioned already, but 
there are also others. Without 
my sponsor, the Student Union 
Governing Board, none of this 
would have been possible. I 
have made many trips into 
Mr. Wilson's office requesting 
something and Mrs. Lyons 
and he were always there to 
help. 

My parents have endured 
my many long distance calls 
and expenses. They even 
journeyed to Monroe from 
New Orleans for four days to 
support me in the state 
pageant. 

I have been graciously 
received and supported by the 
people of Natchitoches and I 
owe much to them, I 
especially thank the 
businesses who supported me 
at the state pageant. It was 
after a hectic, horrible day of 
rehearsals that I noticed their 
ads in the program and this 
lifted my spirits tremen- 
dously. I am indebted also to 
Dr. Galloway and Jim John- 
son for their concern and 
devotion. 

Perhaps the largest portion 
of appreciation goes to all of 
my friends. Thank you Donna, 
Jim, and Jamie for the much- 
needed encouragement you've 
given me. Thank you Becky, 



Debbie, and Rory for at- 
tending pageants with me. 
And thanks to anyone else who 
has helped make this year 
what it was. 

There is one person to whom 
I could never give enough 
thanks. She has been with me 
everwhere and every step of 
the way. She has unselfishly 
given her time and sincere 
devotion to helping me and 
seeing to it that I do my best. 
We have become very close 
and she will always be a dear 
friend. Thank you Vickie, for 
everything ! 

Well, tomorrow night my 
year comes to an end and 
there will be another Miss 
Northwestern to experience a 
year similar to mine. To the 
new Miss Lady of the 



Bracelet, I say good luck an, by I 

best wishes. Currer 
As I walk out on that stag, The pre 
for the last time as Mij, ysL "Rag 



Northwestern, I will look <m 



at everyone out there who ^ Xurpin 
helped make this year so grej; 
for me. I have been extreme!} 
lucky and proud to repress 
Northwestern and I hope yo, 
feel I have done it satisfa c , 
torily. I still have a crown, 
trophy, and a photo album J the entire 
tangible memories of nij powerful Ci 
reign, but it is that certaj) the third q 
something I can't descry be all of th 
that I will cherish the moat 

If I cry, please try to 
derstand that I am 



periencing the end to the bej ^ mond ' 



year of my life. I am only s 
very happy to have had tin d f, fen ' 
opportunity to experience \ 
Thank you all for everything; 



D 



pened acrof 



ftorthweste 
Saturday n 
on the losui 
for the firs 
Northwe 
playing ex 



Stuart W 
quarterbac 
touchdowr 



sational le 




REIGNING BEAUTY— Cheryl Purcell, the 1976 Lady of the 
Bracelet, flashes a smile as she walks the ramp during the 
Miss Louisiana pageant. Cheryl will give up her title 
tomorrow night though she will retain many memories of her 
year as Miss Northwestern. 



Who will be the next Miss Northwestern? 



their only s< 
rainy eveni 
The Den 
winning sti 
artificial £ 
Stadium, 
record to 
losses. US! 
such tearr 
Arkansas S 
moved to 8 
It was 
homecomi 
Demons, \ 
their first r 
years and t 
new stadiu 
L. Williarr 
game, "It i 
ever since 
played sim 
was an all- 

Both 
seemingly ; 
and wet 
several run 
trouble noli 



Co 



In keepin 
Ibwestern 
isposed oi 
Indians a coi 
be intrami 
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last Wedn 
lurpin Stad 

In beginni 
in intramu 
champions 
independent 
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two schoo 



by Muffett Richardson 

Tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. 

| Northwestern will witness the 
final steps in crowning the 
1976 Lady of the Bracelet. 

? Emcees Dr. C. B. "Lum" 
Ellis and Becky Gray Wilson, 
former Miss Louisiana of 1975, 
"will formally introduce the 
girls in competition for the 
title to the audience gathering 



in the Fine Arts Auditorium 
for the evening. The judges 
will be Mr. and Mrs. Joe 
Prather of Shreveport, Ms. 
Maxine Willis of Monroe, and 
Mr. Tommy Laurance of 
Shreveport. 

Twenty girls will participate 
in LOB throughout Wed- 
nesday. The first ten girls 
were interviewed last week in 



the Current Sauce and the last 
group of ten will be presented 
this week. 

Jaree Sherrer from Mena, 
Arkansas is the Sweetheart 
for Phi Mu Alpha, the men's 
music fraternity, which 
sponsored her for the LOB 
pageant. 

Spending six hours a day 
practicing the flute and piano 




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DECEMBER 4, 1976 9:00 p.m.til- 

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Jaree said, "I enjoy what I do. 
I don't feel like it's work at 
all." Jaree is a member of the 
NSU band. She likes to spend 
her free time in the cafeteria 
or outside riding bikes. When 
asked what she thinks of NSU 
she said, "I'm really glad I 
came here, because my piano 
teacher is fantastic— I like the 
school, too!" 

Edith Harris, a speaker at 
heart, is a radio and broadcast 
major in journalism who 
hopes one day to "replace 
Barbara Walters." She is a 
member of Sigma Delta Chi, a 
professional journalism 
society. 

Edith is the president of 
NSU NAACP and is a member 
of the Inspirational Choir. She 
is also a member of the debate 
team. "I like to talk to people 
and read. My favorite book 
was -Chocolate Charlie." She 



did "Ego Tripping ," a 
humorous dramatic in- 
terpretation by Nikki 
Giovanni , for her talent in 
preliminaries. Edith is en- 
joying being involved in LOB 
because, as she said, "So 
many people I love and ad- 
mire are behind me. I've got 
some beautiful people in my 
corner." 

Nell Reed from Opelousas 
hopes to become a research 
dietician after graduating 
from NSU. She is a member of 
the Home Ec. Club, Kappa 
Omicron Phi (a national home 
ec club), and Purple Jackets. 

Nell's talent in 
preliminaries was a hat and 
cane routine to "If They Could 
See Me Now." She said, "I 
was so scared that I don't 
remember any of my per- 
formance." Nell transferred 
from Tech in 1975 and says, 
"I'm much happier over here. 
Everyone is so friendly." 






ALL SMILE NOW ! —These four pretties are seminf inalists in 
the Lady of the Bracelet pageant which is scheduled for 
tomorrow night at 7:30 p.m. in the Fine Arts Auditorium. (L. 
to r.) Ronda Henson, Marylyn Bartek, Denise Gueringer and 
Debra McHalffey will sing and dance their way into the 
hearts of the audience as the pageant begins its journey to 
seek a new queen for the 1977 title. 



Cindy Black is a home ec 
education major and is 
treasurer in the Home Ec. 
Club. She says she has 
benefited from the position 
because, "You see really what 
goes on in the club and get to 
know the people involved in 
the organization." 

Cindy is accompanied by 
her brother on the guitar in 
her talent of singing and said, 
"I feel better because my 
brother is playing behind me, 
supporting me. I really ap- 
preciate him." She enjoys 
crafts and is now in the middle 
of making a braided rug and a 
macrame' purse. 

Ronda Henson spends her 
spare time at cheerleader 
practice or painting. "My 
major is art and I also like to 
do that on the side. On 
weekends I'm at ballgames. 
Spare time is one thing I don't 
seem to have." said Ronda. 

Ronda has an identical twin 
sister, one younger sister and 
a younger brother. She enjoys 
waterskiing and has "always 
been on swim teams. "This is 
her second year to be an NSU 
cheerleader. 

Marylyn Bartek plans to 
travel north after graduating 
from NSU to teach Junior 
High School Biology. "I like 
cold weather," is her reason 
for making these plans. 
Marylyn likes to read, take 
walks and ride bikes. Her 
favorite author is Victoria 
Holt. 

At home in Bossier City, 
Marylyn spends her time 
visiting with her parents. She 
has two older sisters and an 
older brother. In her first year 
as an NSU cheerleader, 
Marylyn is also a member of 
Sigma Sigma Sigma and 
Alpha Lamda Beta Delta, the 



honor society. She said that 
preliminaries were not very 
nerve-racking to her because 
"I was thinking about the 
game that afternoon (NSU vs 
NLU.)" 

Denise Gueringer likes to 
"relax and not study" on 
weekends at home in 
Alexandria. She enjoys 
waterskiing and embroidery, 
but about the latter she says, 
"I'm a good starter and a bad 
finisher." Denise dressed like 
Raggedy Ann to sing and tap 
dance in preliminaries. "I 
learned to tap dance in about 
one weekend. I was so scared, 
because one of the judges was 
a tap dancing instructor." 

Commenting on LOB Denise 
said "It's a whole lot different 
than I thought it would be. It 
really is fun, just like 
everyone told me it would be. " 

Debra McHalffey enjoys 
going to all the baseball 
games and running when she 
has time, one mile in the af- 
ternoon. She also likes to go 
scuba diving and plans a trip 
to Florida next summer to do 
just that. She is an avid reader 
of Harlequinn Romance 
Books in her spare time. 

Debra is a P.E. major with 
dance emphasis. She was a 
member of Red Line, a dance 
team at Woodlawn High in 
Shreveport, for three years. 
She took ballet, tap and jazz 
dancing instructions for one 
year. Debra is interested in 
seeing a dance team start at 
NSU and hopes to become a 
member of it in due time. 

Linda McKnight is not in her 
room very often, and being 
that difficult to catch, it was 
easier to talk to her room- 
mate, Linda Coltharp about 
this LOB participant. 



Linda jogs every night from 
two to four miles, but her main 
hobby is raising plants. In fad 
her room is half full of about 19 
or 20 plants. She seems to be 
the plant doctor on her floor as 
many girls come to her for 
advice on how they should 
feed or take care of their own 
plants. Linda is a flute-player 
in the NSU band which takes 
up most of her time in the 
afternoon along with biology 
labs. 

A biology major, Linda has 
no definite plans for the 
future, although she would 
like to be a taste tester in • 
bubble gum factory up"" 1 
graduation from NSU. He* 
roommate said she's counting 
down the days to the 1$ 
pageant, and seems to " 
getting more nervous all tW 
time. At home in Bossier City* 
Linda has a bird, Sherlock, ' 
dog, Shep, and about 100 cat* 

Known as Twiggy by ^ 
friends, Charlene Mill* 
wishes to obtain a Ph. D ® 
psychology specializing ^ 
counseling. "I intend v 
maintain a household of » 
children. My reason for & 
tog these goals is because * 
my love for life; as 1 
songwriter has put it 'God ha 8 
given it (life) to me and W 
gonna let it shine.'" she said 

Charlene is doing 8 
dramatic interpretation of th e 
black poetess, Barbaf* 
Simmons poem "Soul " 
member of the Alpha KapP" 



Alpha Sorority, Inc., she 
also involved in numer 
other organizations and J^j 
joys outdoor activities, 8)1 
indoor gardening 

Can you choose the 
Miss Northwestern Lady 
the Bracelet? 



beginning o 
Kappa Sif 
league chan 
the fraterni 
from NLU, 

a in 
while NS1 
champs, ( 
NLU's inde 
team, the £ 
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Proved to 
fought coi 
Sigs pulled 
lead behir, 
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"We've i 
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Practicing 
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ase try to <J 
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have had tin 
experience it 
or everything 



November 16, 1976, CURRENT SAUCE Page 5 



Demons upset undefeated Cajuns, 7-3 



by Bill Bossier 
Current Sauce Sports 
The previously unbeaten 
USL "Ragin' Cajuns" hap- 
pened across the artificial turf 
of Turpin Stadium and the 
Northwestern State Demons 
Saturday night, and came out 
on the losing end of the battle 
for the first time this season. 

Northwestern's defense, 
playing excellent throughout 
the entire game, allowed the 
powerful Cajuns a field goal in 
the third quarter that was to 
be all of their scoring. 

Stuart Wright, the Demon 
quarterback, fired a 32 yard 
touchdown pass to Mike 
Almond, who made a sen- 
sational leaping catch over 
USL defenders, to give NSU 
their only score of the cold and 
rainy evening. 

The Demons brought their 
winning streak to five on the 
artificial surface in Turpin 
Stadium, and their season 
record to five wins, four 
losses. USL, the victor over 
such teams as La. Tech, 
Arkansas St., and Cinncinati, 
moved to 8-1 on the year. 

It was a fantastic 
homecoming win for the 
Demons, who were playing 
their first homecoming in two 
years and the first ever in the 
new stadium. Head coach A. 
L Williams said after the 
game, "It is the greatest win 
ever since I've been here. We 
played simply magnificent. It 
was an all-out effort." 
Both offenses were 
seemingly Slowed by the cold 
and wet conditions, with 
several running backs having 
trouble holding on to the ball. 



Northwestern fumbled four 
times and lost three of them, 
while USL let the ball loose 
twice and lost one. 

One fumble by the Demons' 
Mark Schroeder gave USL 
excellent field position at the 
Demon 27. However, the 
Demon defense swarmed all 
over the Cajuns, with the big 
play being a 13 yard sack of 
quarterback Rick Young by 
Demon defensive end Gerald 
Savoie. This moved the ball 
back to 27, where field goal 
specialist Rafael Seption 
missed wide to the right on a 
44 yard attemp. 

The USL quarterback duo of 
Roy Henry, ex Notre Darner, 
and Rick Young completed 
seven passes, but had five 
intercepted. Mike Maggio and 
Willie Mosley were doing most 
of the damage to the Cajuns in 
the defensive secondary, 
while Jerry Edwards, U. L. 
Finister, and Bobby Kirchoff 
caused problems along the 
line of scrimmage. 

The interceptions by the 
Demon defense gave the of- 
fense several other scoring 
opportunities in the fourth 
quarter, but they failed to 
capitalize on them. Fumbles 
also plagued the Cajuns in the 
last frame, with quarterback 
Roy Henry fumbling once 
when hit hard from the blind 
side by Jerry Edwards. This 
was a very important tur- 
nover, for the Cajuns were 
trying to mount a comeback 
drive late in the game. USL 
head coach Augie Tam- 
mariello rushed out on to the 
field to argue that Henry was 



in the motions of passing the 
ball, but all that he received 
was a 15 yard penalty for 
unsportsmanlike conduct. 

Coach Tammariello said 
after the game, "We didn't 
expect what we got out of 
Northwestern. They have a 
tremendous squad and they 
were up for us." The Cajuns 
may have been a little over- 
confident for the fray with the 
Demons, after coming off a 
come-from-behind victory 
over Arkansas St. Arkansas 
St. had blasted NSU earlier in 
the season 44-24. 

Sidney Thornton was once 
again the workhorse for the 
Demons. "The Bull" ripped 
and roared his way for 95 
yards on 33 carries to be the 
leading rusher for the Demons 
and the game. Thornton also 
picked up valuable yardage on 
screen passes from Stuart 
Wright. Frank Hating, having 
one of his best games this 
season, picked up 32 yards on 
only 9 carries. 

The Demon passing attack 
was still not harp, but it 
clicked the one time that was 
necessary. Wright connected 
on three of ten passes for 52 
yards and had one inercepted. 

USL's rushing attack was 
held for under 100 yards by the 
stingy Demon defense. 
Raymond Lation was their 
leading ground gainer, getting 
sixty yards on fourteen 
carries. Emanuel Guidry 
rushed five times for 22 yards. 

Quarterback Roy Henry 
was five of sixteen for fifty 
yards and had four in- 
tercepted. His main receiver 
was David Oliver, who caught 



Couyon 8, Kappa Sig win 



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mories of her 



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nil of about IS 
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time in the 
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or, Linda has 
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"Soul." A 
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In keeping with the Nor- 
thwestern Demons, who 
isposed of the Northeast 
Indians a couple of weeks ago, 
4e intramural flag football 
teams from NSU did the same 
In the teams from Northeast 
last Wednesday night in 
Turpin Stadium. 

In beginning a new tradition 
in intramural football, the 
champions from both the 
independent leagues and the 
fraternity leagues from the 
two schools met for the 
beginning of a new rivalry. 

Kappa Sigma, the fraternity 
league champs from NSU met 
the fraternity league champs 
from NLU, also from Kappa 
Sigma in the 7:30 contest, 
while NSU's independent 
champs, Couyon 8 played 
NLU's independent runner-up 
team, the Soul Society. 

The game between the two 
teams from Kappa Sigma 
proved to be a very hard- 
fought contest. Northeast's 
Sigs pulled out to an early 6-0 
'ead behind a very sharp 
Passing attack. Good defen- 
sive play was evident on both 
•earns, with the Northeast 



secondary making excellent 
touchdown saving pass 
deflections. 

NSU's Kappa Sigs scored 
late in the contest on a 4 yard 
scoring pass from Tony Bailey 
to Terry Downs, who was wide 
open in the endzone. The extra 
point, which proved to be the 
winning point for NSU, was a 
similar play that went to 
Henry Graebner, also open in 
the endzone. 

NLU didn't stop after falling 
behind, and began a good 
drive that went to the NSU 
four. During this drive, a long 
pass play was broken up when 
Ray Ranger tripped an NLU 
receiver, but no penalty for 
pass interference was called 
by the official right on top of 
the play (Alost?). 

With time running short on 
NLU, a last second pass into 
the endzone was thrown 
barely out of reach of the 
intended receiver's out- 
stretched arms, and the 
Northwestern Kappa Sigs won 
the contest, 7-6. 

The second game between 
Couyon 8 and the Soul Society 
was not as close as was ex- 



pected. Couyon 8 jumped out 
to an early 7-0 lead, and was 
never behind in the game. A 
long bomb from Ricky Primm 
to Curtis Ardoin put the score 
to 13-0, and Couyon could rest 

easier. Ardoin had earlier 
dropped a similar pass that 
was easily another touch- 
down, and the crowd was after 
him all evening. He redeemed 
himself with the lone TD pass. 

The Soul Society scored on a 
long pass play, with the 
receiver easily outrunning the 
Couyon secondary to go into 
the endzone untouched. 

Couyon scored another 
touchdown on another long 
pass, and with the extra point, 
moved out to a 20-6 lead, The 

Soul Society scored late in the 
game, and the final score was 
Couyon 8 20, Soul Society 13. 

Couyon 8 will represent NSU 
at the statewide flag football 

championships to be held in 
Baton Rouge on the LSU 
campus. 



The first two weeks of 
basketball practice for NSU 
State University apparently 
We head coach Tynes Hilde- 
brand pleased. 

"We've accomplished what 

*e set out to do," Hildebrand 

^d, "and myself and all our 

Caches are very happy with 

*e work we've been able to 
do." 

The Demons, coming off a 
l4 -10 record in the 1975-76 
^ason, have been officially 
Practicing for two weeks, 
^"ess has been put on of- 
fensive patterns and the fast 
*eak along with basic fun- 
Jkmentals, according to 
^dehrand. 

"We 're trying to pick up 
*here we left off last season," 
^debrandsaid. "We finished 

hot, and we're hoping we 
Can keep that up." 

Northwestern won 10 of its 
N 12 outings in the 1975-76 
^ason after a mid-season 
^Unp, Last season was the 
one for NSU as a college 
^vision entry, as the Demons 
7* v e stepped up to Division I 
* basketball this season. 

'We've got a tougher 
^*>edule because of the jump 



to major college," Hildebrand 
said, "but our coaches are 
confident about this team. I 
guess a big reason is that 
we're much more mature than 
last year and we've got a good 
bit of experience returning." 

Hildebrand, assistant coach 
Dr. Derwood Duke and 
graduate assistant coach 
Ralph Pirn have a nucleus of 
six seniors to work with this 
season, including four 
returning starters. The group 
is led by 6-foot-6 forward Billy 
Reynolds, the Demons' 
leading scorer and rebounder 
last year and a candidate for 
post-season honors this year. 

Other returning starters 
include 6-foot-6 forward 
Lester Elie, 6-foot-2 guard 
Dan Bell and 5-foot-9 guard 
Lester Davis. 

"Maturity's going to be our 
big asset," Hildebrand said , 
"but we've got some freshman 
that are going to play a lot for 
us this season. As a group, 
they're a lot better than we 
thought they'd be at this 
time." 

The group of six freshman 
on the 15-man squad is led by 
6-foot-7 Frederick Piper of 



four passes for thirty-eight 
yards. 

The Northwestern Demon's 
wind up the 1976 campaign 
here in Turpin Stadium 
against the Lions from 
Southeastern Louisiana 
University in Hammond. SLU 
is having an excellent season 
behind the running of Horace 
Belton and quarterback Don 
Griffin, a former quarterback 
at LSU. NSU can have it's first 
winning season in several 
years with a victory over the 
Lions, and it's first winning 
record for head coach A. L. 
Williams. Kickoff is scheduled 
for 7:30 p. m. Saturday night. 





WHAT'S GOING ON HERE ... It is hard to tell what is 
happening in this picture, but it wasn't hard telling that the 
Northwestern Demons upset the powerful Cajuns from USL. 
Fumble recoveries and pass interceptions by the Demon 
defense completely dominated the 92nd Homecoming con- 



test. NSU's defense held the Cajuns to under 150 yards total 
offense, and Sidney Thornton rushed for 95 yards. The big 
play, however, was a 32-yard touchdown pass from Stuart 
Wright to Mike Almond that gave the Demons all they needed 
for a victory. 




Pigskin Predictions 




I didn't even want to write 
about the panel this week, but 
I think Colette would kill me if 
I didn't. I now regret talking 
her into doing the panel, for 
she was 10-14 on the week. 
Buzzeta was 9-14, Ryder 6-14, 
and mvself 8-14. 



This weeks guests are Mary 
Judith Gremillion, head of S- 
UGB Coffeyhouse, and Ronnie 
Buzzetta, plain ol' Sauce 
worker. Well, Ryder; at least 
it wasn't all your fault — it 
must have been bad vibrations 
for Sister Helen. 





NSU vs SLU 
LSU vs TUL 
LSU vs UTAH 
GRAM vs SOUTHERN 
USL vs MCNEESE 
TECH vs NLU 
NICH vs DELTA ST. 
CHICAGO vs DET. 
CINCI vs K.C. 
HOUSTON vs PITTS 
L.A. vs S.F. 
N.O. vs SEATTLE 
WASH vs St. LOUIS 
S.D. vs BUFFALO 



BOSSIER 



NSU 28-24 

LSU 48-14 

LSU 35-7 

S.U. 28-21 

USL 14-13 
TECH 21-10 

NICH 10-3 

CHICAGO 28-17 

CINCI 35-21 

PITTS 28-10 

S. F. 28-17 

N.O. 17-10 

ST. LOUIS 17-13 
BUFFALO 21-13 



RYDER 


GREMILLION 


BUZZETTA 


NSU 28-7 


NSU 10-6 


NSU 24-17 


LSU 48-3 


LSU 21-17 


LSU 35-10 


LSU 514) 


LSU 28-7 


LSU 42-7 


S.U. 28-24 


GRAM 14-10 


S.U. 24-21 


MSU 17-13 


USL 28-17 


USL 35-28 


TECH 27-14 


TECH 24-10 


NLU 21-17 


NICH 14-10 


NICH 14-6 


NICH 10-7 


CHICAGO 31-14 


DET. 14-10 


CHICAGO 28-10 


CINCI 40-7 


CINCI 28-7 


CINCI 35-10 


PITTS 38-17 


PITTS 24-7 


PITTS 31-21 


L.A. 14-13 


S.F. 21-17 


S.F. 27-14 


N.O. 31-3 


N.O. 17-10 


N.O. 23-10 


WASH 13-10 


WASH 24-20 


ST. LOUIS 21-20 


BUFFALO 24-21 


S.D. 20-17 


S.D. 14-10 



I 



Lady Demons complete preseason workouts 



Hildebrand pleased with progress 



Alexandria, last year's Most 
Valuable Player in the state in 
AAA. "Frederick's one of the 
better freshman players 
we've ever had, and he's going 
to be counted on this season," 
Hildebrand said. 

Other freshman cited by 
Hildebrand included Lee 
Arthur Smith, Robert Lively, 
Edward Touhy, Neil Simmons 
and Michael Maurice. 
"They'll be the difference in a 
good ball club and an out- 
standing one." 

The Demons have scheduled 
an intrasquad scrimmage at 2 
p.m. on the afternoon of 
Homecoming on Nov. 13. It 
will be one of a series of 
scrimmages NSU will hold 
before the season opener 
against McNeese State on 
Nov. 30. 

"I think we'll have a win- 
ning team this year," 
Hildebrand said. "That's a big 
statement with the schedule 
we're playing but I still think 
it's realistic. We're going to 
have a pretty good club, and if 
things go right we'll have an 
outstanding one." 



The Lady Demon basket- 
ball squad wound up three 
weeks of pre-season workouts 
Friday, and head coach 
Charlotte Corley sees good 
possibilities of improving 
upon last years 18-17 season 
record. 

"We've been having real 
good practices," Corley said, 
"and the attitudes of the 
players have been just 
beautiful. We've gotten 
everything done that I could 

have hoped for at this stare." 

The Lady Demons open 
their season Nov. 30 in 
Prather Coliseum on the NSU 
campus against McNeese 



State, one of eight 
doubleheaders that the 
women's team will play with 

Northwestern's men's varsity 
team. Game time on the 
doubleheader nights is 5:30 
p.m. 

"I hope that fans will come 
out early and watch us play 
before the men's games," 
Corley said. "We're going to 
play an exciting brand of ball 
this season." 

The Lady Demons have 
been emphasizing defense and 
the full-court press in 
workouts so far. "We've got to 
do something to make up for 
our lack of height," Corley 



said, "because we don't have 
any big people." 

There may not be big 
people, but there are seven 
returning lettermen and the 
starting five returns intact. 
Three new signees will also 
add depth to the squad. 

Lisa Brewer, a 5-foot-6 sopho 
more from DeRidder, returns 
after leading the team in 
scoring with a 17.9 average 
last season. Diane Pittman, 
senior from Hammond, was 
the second leading scorer and 
rebounder with 15.0 and /.7 
averages respectively despite 
being injured much of the 
season. 



Tammy Primeaux, a 
sophomore from Gueydan, led 
the squad in rebounding with a 
12.8 average and will return in 
the post position. 

Other starters back include 
Diana Cary, Louise Bonin and 



Pat Nolen, with Becky Guidry 
also returning as lettermen. 
New signees include Lillie 
Scott of Hammond, Theresa 
Long of Olla, and Belinda 
Morse of Ponchatoula. 



Harriers end season 




Northwestern State 
University's young cross 
country team ended its ab- 
breviated season on a high 
note last Saturday with a 
second-place finish in a 
triangular meet with Nor- 
theast La. and Centenary over 
the NLU course in Monroe. 

The NLU squad took first 
place with 35 points, even 
though placing only one 
runner in the top five. Nor- 
thwestern, which had three 
runners finishing among the 
top five, was only one point 
back with 36 points for second 
place and Centenary was third 
with 53 points. 

Sean O'Donnell, a freshman 
from Ireland, finished second 
in 24:56 over the five-mile 
course to lead a 2-3-4 finish for 
the Demon harriers. Fresh- 
man Homer Clark of Leesville 
was third in 25:21 and fresh- 
man Windell Bonner of 
Minden finished fourth in 
25:24. 

Mike Quigley of Northeast 
was the individual winner with 
a 24:32 clocking. Centenary's 
only runner to crack the top 
five was Ron Casillias, who 
finished fifth in 25:33. 



The other two NSU runners 
taking part in the meet were 
sophomore Glenn Cortella of 
Alexandria, who was 12th in 
28:01, and freshman Shaun 
McLaughlin of Ireland, who 
finished 13th in 28:07. 

Coach Jerry Dyes' NSU 
squad, sporting four freshman 
and a sophomore, finished 1-1 
in dual meets during the fall 
and finished second in two 
other three-way meets. The 
Demon harriers also figured 
prominently in two larger 
meets, placing individuals in 
the top five in both the Har- 
ding College Invitational and 
the USL invitational. 




Page 6 CURRENT SAUCE N ovember 16, 1976 

Flu in full swing 



By Bob Rash 

Although the swine flu 
immunization program is 
sweeping the country today by 
way of the media, the public 
doesn't know what the disease 
really is. The purpose of this 
article is to enlighten the 
reader. 

The swine flue is made up of 
antibodies that are in most 
people's blood. It is most 
likely to occur in people over 
50 years of age. The virus was 
first detected in February of 
1976 at Fort Dix, New Jersey. 
During this outbreak the 
strain was isolated and 
named. 

It is similar to the great 
influenza epidemic (pan- 
demic), in that it is able to 
spread from person to person. 
Also, there is the presence of 
antibodies that are likened to 



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BETTER THAN 
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swine-like virus. 

There is treatment for this 
virus due to science and 
research. Vaccines are an 
effective way of preventing 
the virus and antibiotics are 
helpful in treating the com- 
plications of the influenza and 
therefore reducing the 
number of fatalities. 

The vaccine that is injected 
into the person contains a 
virus that has been killed. This 
dead virus causes the body to 
produce antibodies, therefore 
preventing a person from 
contracting the virus. It 
should be mentioned that this 
virus is grown in eggs and that 
anyone allergic to eggs should 
not take the immunization 
without first consulting their 
physician. If a person is 
unable to take the shot, he 
may still be safe if he lives in 
an area where there is a high 
percentage of the population 
immunized against the virus. 



RAIN GARDEN 





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HARMON DREW GROUP-On Saturday, Nov. 20, the 
Natchitoches Parish Chamber of Commerce will present its 
annual Fund Raising Dance. Music will be provided by the 
Harmon Drew Group and the dance will be held at the Jaycee 
Building at the fairgrounds. The tickets will be $4 00 each and 
will be on sale at the Chamber office, Caplan's, University 
Sounds, DeBlieux's, The Village, P & C Drug, Radio Shack, 
and Shamrock Liquor. 




Band 

featured\ 

The Demon Marching Band 
featured several outstanding 
musicians last Saturday night 
during a special half time show 
dedicated to alumni returned 
to NSU for Homecoming. 

Music for the halftime show 
will include Dr. Jerry Payne's 
own arrangements of "Pic- 
tures de Espana" and "Over 
the Rainbow." Payne is the 
bands director. The band 
featured its flag corps, 
twirling line and rifle corps to 
a medley of songs taken from 
the 10th album recorded by 
the group Chicago. The 
"Battle Hymn of the 
Republic" was played as the 
band left the field. 

"Pictures de Espana" 
featured sophomore music 
education major Mike 
Williams in a trumpet solo and 
a trumpet trio composed of 
Williams John Rhoad and 
Randy Sweeney. 

The bands tuba section had 
the spotlight in "Over the 
Rainbow." Featured players 
were Karl Carpenter, Scott 
Woodward, Gary Butler and 
Charles Beasley Jerone Fay 
Jay Mueller Jeff Nolan and 
Clifford Moore Williams and 
Rhoad were also featured on 
trumpet in "Over the Rain- 
bow." 

The medley of Chicago 
tunes presented Saturday 
night included such single hits 
as "Skin Tight," "If You 
Leave Me Now" and "Another 
Rainy Day in New York City." 

NSU's marching band also 
played during pre-game 
ceremonies highlighted by the 
formal presentation of the 
Homecoming queen and court. 



ONE MAN SHOW— Robert Rector, associate professor of art 
at NSU, will present a one man art show of his paintings in 
New Orleans November 29-December 10 at Diversity's 
Gallery. Mr. Rector will have a preview showing November 
27. 

Argus Contributions 

ARGUS, a new student be submitted by one person, 
publication at NSU, is The only requirement is that 
soliciting contributions of you be an NSU student. The 
poetry, prose, photography form below should accompany 
and art from NSU students for all entries. Contributions will 
the Spring 1977 issue. If you be judged by an editorial 
fancy yourself a writer, board of NSU students and 
photographer or artist, why may be submitted to Room 
not share your creativity? 316-L., Department of 
There is no limit to the Languages in the Arts and 
number of items which may Sciences Building. 



DATA FORM FOR CON TRIBUTIONS TO ARGUS 



NAME 



MAILING ADDRESS. 



HOMETOWN. 



PHONE NUM BER 

MAJOR AND CLASSIFICATION _ 
MEDIUM (POETRY, ESSAY, 
FICTION, PHOTOGRAPHY, TITLE 
ART, ETC.) 



UNWANTED hair trom the 
arms, legs & face 
REMOVED. ..quickly and 
permanently by a Registered 
Electrologist. "G. J." 
Johnson, 1013 Parkway Drive, 
Phone 352-4983. By ap 
pointment only! 



ANY ADDITIONAL IN- 
FORMATION ABOUT 
SUBJECT, TECHNIQUE, 
ETC 



RETURN TO ROOM 316-L, 
DEPT. OF LANGUAGES 
ARTS AND SCIENCES 
BLDG. 



can make 
anybody 
* qoM! 



What's big for Christmas 
is gigantic at 
Jeans Alley! 





LIBERTY BELL 



Declare 
financial 
independence. 



Take stock in America. 
Buy U.S. Savings Bonds. 



Three Columns 




PROMOTION TO COLONEL-Lt. Col. Paul R. Reed, 
professor of military science and director of ROTC, is all 
smiles as his wife and parents participate in the ceremony 
promoting him to colonel in the United States Army. At- 
taching the colonel's eagle insignia to his uniform are his 
wife, Jan (second from left), and his father, Paul L. Reed. At 
left is his mother. 



Who's Who pix 
scheduled 

All students selected for 
Who's Who Among American 
Colleges and Universities will 
meet for individual pictures 
with a photographer 
November 16. 

Phyllis Folse, POTPOURRI 
editor for personalities and 
events, has announced that 
the Who's Who students will 
meet at 4 p.m. at the main 
entrance to the campus on 
College Avenue. 

"This is the one time 
available for the photographer 
to shoot each of these 
students' pictures," Folse 
said. "We hope all of them will 
be present." 

Home Ec Club 
plans trip 

to Dallas 

The Home Economics Club 
members will take a trip to 
Dallas November 29 to visit 
the Neiman Marcus store, the 
Apparel Mart, and to dine at 
the Oriental Tea Room. The 
trip is open to all interested 
members. 

Dietetics majors attended 
the American Dietetic 
Association meeting in 
Monroe last Friday. 

At the last Home Economics 
club meeting Mrs. Gay Melder 
demonstrated various types of 
flower arrangements. Laura 
Jenkins won the arrangement 
given away as a door prize. 

The club wishes to 
congratulate Mrs. Johnson 
and Dr. Celia Decker on being 
nominated for a faculty chair; 
Jackie Phillips and Nell Reed 
for being nominated to the 
Homecoming Court ballot; 
and Cindy Black and Nell 
Reed for making the in the 
Lady of the Bracelet pageant. 



CAMPUS 
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Taylor Chosen 
for program 

Maxine F. Taylor, associate 
professor of history is one of 

DISCOUNT 
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Phone 352-6466 
132 St. Denis St. 



only 30 educators from 
throughout the United States 
chosen to participate this 
week in The Train for 
Equality Institute at the 
University of California at Los 
Angeles. 

The six-day program at 
UCLA is being funded by the 
U.S. Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare. More 
than 450 persons who desire to 
assist women in career op- 
portunities applied for par- 
ticipation in the institute. 

Train for Equality Institute 
personnel are especially in- 
terested in training 
professional people to assist 
women who are re-entering 
college. The institute also 
provides participants an 
opportunity to explore 
women's rights under the 
Women's Equality 
Educational Act. 

Nationally-known 
authorities in the area of 
women's education will serve 
as guest speakers at the in- 
stitute to discuss how women 
may explore their career 
potentials through the assi- 
stance of trained 
professionals. 

Mrs. Taylor has been active 
for several years in women's 
education. Considered a 
leader in women's education 
in Louisiana, the educator 
introduced a womafE history 
course last spring in which 35 
students enrolled. 

The associate professor of 
history is also director of the 
Natchitoches Area Humanist 
Group that was formed th- 
rough a grant from the state of 
Louisiana that was funded by 
the National Endowment for 
the Humanities. The purpose 
of the grant was to establish in 
the community a wide variety 
of programs in which mem- 
bers of the group emphasize 
the humanistic aspects of the 
changing role of women 

Mrs. Taylor, who has been a 
member of the Department of 
Social Sciences faculty since 
1969, received a grant last 
summer from the University 
of California at Berkeley to 
attend a workshop in media 
and American civilization. 



DENISEG 
at the am 
Auditoriun 
contest thi 




Vol. LX 



ACT test score of 20 or above. 
This award allows the student 
to earn approximately $160q 
during a four year period « 
undergraduate art study 
NSU. 

One-man 
ceramics show 
slated 

A one-man show of ceramics 
by Joe Coulter will be 
presented Nov. 15 through 
Dec. 3 in the A.A. Fredericks 
Fine Arts Gallery . 

Coulter, who is head of the 
Department of Art at Hender. 
son State University, has 
exhibited his ceramic 
creations nationally in one- 
man shows and at competition 
exhibitions. 

For the past two years, the 
widely-acclaimed potter has 
won first place in the State 
Festival of Arts at Little Rock, 
Ark. He has also demon- 
strated his talents at the world 
famous Ozark Folk Culture 
Center in Arkansas. 

Coulter, who was one of the 
guest lecturers and demon- 
strators at NSU's crafts- 
career conference this 
summer. 

Dr. Grady Harper, acting 
chairman of the Department 
of Art said Coulter will be on 
the campus Nov. 14 to par- 
ticipate in a preview reception 
from 2 p.m. until 4 pjn. in the 
gallery. The public is invited 
to attend the preview showing 

Coulter's exhibit of 
ceramics will be on display 
Monday through Friday from 
8 a.m. until 4:30 pjn. 



Kelly holds 
flute recital 

Susan Kelly, presented a 
flute recital Sunday, at 3 p. in. 
in the Little Theatre of A. A, 
Fredericks Fine Arts Center 

Susan is a student of Mrs, 
Donna Rose and is a candidate 
for the bachelor of music 
education degree. 

The NSU coed currently 
serves as principal flutist for 
the Natchitoches 
Northwestern Symphony 
Orchestra and the NSU 
Concert Band. 

Accompanying Susan 
during her recital program 
will be Susie Thompson at the 
piano, Leslie Hale on oboi 
Jaree Sherrer at the piano, perintenden 
Laura McKnight on clarinet itchitoches, 
and Kay Baumgartner^g^ 
soprano. 

Her recital program 
eluded Henry Purcell^'""' 
"Sonata in G Minor," GoroW" sim 
Jacob's "Trio," Arth 
Honegger's :'Danse de 
Cheuve," Charles Griffes Mess men, 
Poem" and Aaron Copland'^ 100 perc« 
"As It Fell Upon a Day." 



Lit 



Clarient recital 
by McKnight 

held 



Street 



When you think 
of mens wear 
think of 



Capuan's 



Located next to Broadmoor Shopping Center 



Art Department 
holds high school 
exhibit 

The NSU Art Department is 
sponsoring a state-wide high 
school drawing exhibit which 
will feature the work of 
students in the 10th, 11th and 
12th grades. 

The matted or unmatted 
work will not exceed 22" x 34". 
Any medium such as pen and 
ink, crayon, charcoal or any 
other will be accepted. 

To be hung in the exhibition, 
to open December 4 and run 
through December 10, the 
drawings must be sent in to 
the Art Department no later 
than November 29. All works 
will be returned to the dif- 
ferent artists after the closing 
of the exhibition. 

Three awards will be given 
for entries in each grade 
level: 10th— art materials and 
art books; 11th— art materials 
and art books, and 12th— three 
NSU presidential work 
awards will be available to 
seniors in high school with an 



A student recital featurW 
Laura McKnight 
Shreveport on clarinet ^gdorf built 
presented Wednesday nigh'' 1 °gram. In IS 
the Little Theatre of A. A. about eigl 
dericks Fine Arts Center, krhas been i 

^ore lights 
d each \ 
shine so 
until thi 



The NSU musician i* 
student of Mrs. Maxyne 
of the music faculty and 
presently working toward * 
bachelor of music educa 01 
degree. 

Miss McKnight attended 
Aspen Music Festival 
summer where she st 



fa 1927 



by 
Mi 



an e 
'ling. Astre 
ram wj 
r'Strr- 
/tocheswith 
am met 



Mr. 



Burgdo 
as bu 
'sined some 
?an our li 
V less ex 
*s most citii 
°ve effectiv 
ferry Chrisi 
file large st 
»* first lighti 



the 



She was assisted by 



Paul Torgrimson at the P' 8 ^ 
Also accompanying j 
musician he " 



will be 
Williams on trumpet 
Hopkins on 



lightinj 
ely & 
the rn 
e s acros! 
wirii 



with Leon Russianoff of v 
played in various ensemb^ oj ec t i wn j cn 
She is a member of Tau 8* in ^ 
Sigma, the Internal^ ^ ' 
Clarinet Society and 1 
Alpha Iota. 



.. trombone, ^ i- 
Kelly at the piano, Julie ^ 
on violin, Milton Monroe f 
piano and Kay Baumga rD 
soprano. 

rec' 1 ! 



Miss McKnight's 
program included Fr'£ 
Poulenc's "Sonata," WiH 
Prunty's "Trio Allegri* 
Clarinet, Trumpet, 
bone," Arnold Cooke's = ^ 
Songs of Innocence" „ 
Darius Milhand's "Suit* 




( 



or above, 
>e student 
ely $160j 
period of 
study at 



lOVV 



ceramics 
will be 
through 
rederickj 

ad of the 
t Hender- 
iity, has 
ceramic 
in one- 
mpetition 

ears, the 
otter has 
the State 
ttle Rock, 
demon- 
the world 
; Culture 

me of the 
1 demon- 
; crafts- 
:e this 

r, acting 
partment 
will be on 
4 to par- 
reception 
.m. in the 
is invited 
v showing 
ibit of 
n display 
iday from 
n. 




Gueringer captures LOB crown 



by Muffett Richardson 

Miss Mary Denise Gueringer, a 
sophomore nursing student from 
Alexandria, was crowned Miss NSU 
two weeks ago at the annual Lady of the 
Bracelet beauty pageant. 

Denise, who is a 1975 graduate of 
Menard High School, was also voted 
Miss Congeniality by other pageant 
contestants. She is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Gueringer. 

In addition to competing in the Miss 
Louisiana pageant, Denise will appear 
in the annual Natchitoches Christmas 
Festival parade. "I'm shocked. I still 
can't believe it. It hits me in little 
spurts," said Denise after the pageant. 

Denise's parents attended the 



pageant and were very excited for her. 
She had asked her mother to save her a 
place in the audience, because she 
didn't believe she would in the top ten. 

First runner-up was Mary Lynn 
Bartek of Bossier City. She holds a key 
position in that if Denise cannot be Miss 
NSU at any time during her reign. 
Mary Lynn will step up to hold the title. 

Mary Lynn is the daughter of Lt. Col. 
and Mrs. J. J. Bartek. Her NSU honors 
include State Fair Queen, university 
cheerleader, pom pom line, baseball 
bat girl and Alpha Lambda Delta fresh- 
man honor society. She is a member of 
Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority. 

Second runner-up was Ronda Henson 



of Natchitoches. She is a junior in art 
education and an NSU cheerleader. The 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gerome 
Henson, Ronda hopes to become an art 
teacher. 

Lee Ann Blaufuss, a freshman in 
secretarial administration, was third 
runner-up. She was also the winner in 
talent, singing •The Shadow of Your 
Smile." She is the daughter of Lt. Col. 
and Mrs. Philipp Blaufuss. 

Suzzanne Johnson, a 19 year old 
junior in prephysical therapy, was 
fourth runner-up. Her honors include 
runner -up in Holiday on Water, 
senator-at-large at NSU and Top 10 
finalist on the Lady of the Bracelet for 



the past two years. She is the daughter 
of Mrs. Man- E. Johnson of Bossier 
City. 

Debra Ann McHalffey, a freshman in 
health, safety, physical education, won 
in swimsuit competition. She is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald 
McHalffey and is a 1975 graduate of 
Woodlawn High School in Shreveport. 

Other girls making top ten in com- 
petition were Sherry Lynn Anderson, a 
senior in library science; Edith Mae 
Harris, a sophomore in broadcast 
journalism; Debra McHalffey 
Charlene Miller, a sophomore 
psychology major; and Elizabeth Anne 
Posey, a junior in art education. 



DENISE GUERINGER— New LOB queen Denise Gueringer is crowned Miss NSU 
at the annual pageant, which was held in the A .A. Fredericks Fine Arts 
Auditorium. Miss Gueringer will represent Northwestern at the Miss Louisiana 
contest this year. 






CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. LXTV, No. 12 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 



NATCH fTOCHES, LOUISIANA 



November 30, 1976 



tsented a 
at 3 p. m. 
e of A. A. 
ts Center. 
at of Mrs. 
candidate 
of music 

currently 
flutist for 
ochei- 
iymphonj 
the NSU 

Susan 
program 
won at the 
on oboe, 




Davis announces resignation 



DAVID WALKER 



Lites' set Saturday 



SGA President Clinton Davis an- 
nounced his resignation at a special 
called meeting of the SGA Student 
Senate on Thursday Nov. 18. 

Davis resigned due to the fact that he 
plans to attempt to test out of school at 
the beginning of next semester. 

Davis, who was elected unopposed 
last spring, then plans to attend law 
school at an out of state school. 

Among the things accomplished 
during Davis' administration were 
revision of the outdated SGA Con- 
stitiution, an attempt to allow students 
the opportunity to drink beer on 
campus, revision of the committee 
system of SGA, improvement of 
campus parking lots and roads, a fee 
increase for KNWD-FM and for the 
cheerleaders, and others. 

SGA Elections 



Under the provisions of the SGA 
Constitution SGA Vice President David 
O'Shee Walker will assume the office of 
president at the end of this semester. 
Davis' resignation is effective at the 
end of this semester. Also, according to 
the SGA Constitution, Senate Chairman 
Bob Ryder will assume the office of 
vice president. A new senate chairman 
will be elected from the floor of the 
senate. 

Walker, 20, is a junior accounting 
major from Alexandria. He is a 
graduate of Menard Central High 
School, and is a member of Kappa 
Sigma Fraternity here at NSU. He 
served as Kappa Sigma treasurer last 
year. 

His experience in student govern- 
ment includes senator-at-large, and 



vice president. He has served on 
various committees and boards in this 
capacity. 

Walker made this statement to 
Current Sauce. "I look forward to 
working closely with everyone in SGA 



and the student body. We have not 
forgotten certain issues concerning the 
student body, such as the beer issue, 
Mardi Gras, students at the Shreveport 
campus, and the Legal Aid Program." 
Program." 



Movie set Thursday 



"The Hindenburg," starring George 
C. Scott, will be shown December 2 in 
the Arts and Sciences Auditorium 
beginning at 6 and 8:30 p. m. 

The actual 1937 on-the-spot broadcast 
by Chicago radio announcer Herb 
Morrison is used to authentically 
recreate one of the world's greatest air 
tragedies. 

The Hindenburg, a German airship, 



flies toward Lakehurst, N.J. amid anti- 
Natzi destruction threats while a time 
bomb on board ticks towards 
destructing. 

Scott is a German Colonel responsible 
for ensuring the airship's safety. His 
search for the saboteur unravels piece 
by piece as he frantically studies the 
psychological intentions of his 97 
passengers and crew members. 



in 



Copland^ 

i Day." 




icital 
efht 



by Steven Parson 
1927 Mr. Max Burgdorf, then 
the pianolperintendent of utilities of the City of 
n clarinet itchitoches, decided that our city 
ngartnetiWed an expression of Christmas 
Wing. A street and river bank lighting 
'^■ am el j7»gram was initiated to send 
■ " U GordC istmas Greetings from Nat- 
Arthuff tocnes with warmth and beauty. The 
se de l«r l p" arn met with approval from local 
Griffe'f 8 ' ness men, and they supported the 
100 percent. 

Burgdorf found that a 10 watt 
*mas bulb was being sold. He 
ed some of these lights and thus 
our lighting program. These 
less expensive than the larger 
most cities use, have continued to 
i « effective in wishing thousands 
"ferry Christmas" each year. 
I featurW large star in the east was part of 
ght 1 !n rst lighting program. In 1927 Mr. 
irir*t *gdorf built part of the first lighting 
lay nigh" ogram. In 1927 Mr. Burgdorf built the 
f A. A. T about eight feet across; today the 
Center, irhas been expanded to 21 feet wide. 

is 1 k** ^&& a ^ pieces have been 
cia " eS£fl l* d each year. Over 340,000 tiny 
dty and ' ^ shine so ftly from the first Satur- 
toward** mta me weekend after New 

: educa^Jf 8 -. 

" e lighting program covers ap- 
ttended * ^mately 34 blocks of the downtown 
stival *r*> the riverbank area and the 
he stud»Wges across Cane River. Over 100 
ianoff JSC* of wiring have gone into this 
VT^tAT*' wnich is now valued at more 
ernatio^j 



and S* 



es P. Solomos, lighting chair 



man and a crew of a dozen men started 
early in September to string the 
thousands of lights along the river 
banks and city streets. This project 
requires at least two weeks. When the 
lights are turned on and off after the 
new Year, all are stored until the next 
year. 

The fireworks display which plays a 
major role in the Christmas Festival 
Program was started in 1936. Mr. Allen 
Cox and Mr. Sam West originated the 
idea and approached business men for 
donations. Once again, the Nat- 
chitoches merchants enthusiastically 
supported the program. The first 
display was valued at $300. Presently 
over $4,500 are spent on the spectacular 
array of fireworks each year. 

It has been estimated that 75 to 80 
thousand people attend the Christmas 
Festival annually. Since its modest 
beginning in 1927, the festival has 
become one of the finest pre-Christmas 
celebrations held anywhere. 

The Christmas parade will be held 
Saturday, Dec. 4 at 1:30 p.m., and the 
lights will be turned on at ap- 
proxiamtely 7:30 p.m., after the 
fireworks. Short skits will be given on 
the riverfront about the "Louisiana 
Cavalier", and the Entertainers will 
also perform. 

Co-Chairmen for the 1976 Christmas 
Festival are Mr. Richard Ware, and 
Mrs. Rufus Morgan. Grand Marshall is 
Mrs. Jeanette Gunter, who has served 
for 15 years on the Festival Committee. 



Mr., Miss NSU runoffs set tomorrow 



A runoff election will be held 
tomorrow in the Student Union to 
decide who will be elected to be Mr. and 
Miss NSU. 

Rodney Wise and Stan Haynes will 
meet each other in the race for Mr. 
NSU, while Donna King and Sharon 
Mack will be facing each other for the 



title of Miss NSU. 

Stan Haynes, a distributive education 
major, is a member of Kappa Sigma 
fraternity. He has lettered two years as 
Athletic Football Trainer, and is now in 
las second year as an NSU cheerleader. 
He has served as an SGA Senator-at- 
large and is currently the SGA Vice 
President for Men. A member of the 



Christmas concert set 



ed by 
it the pi 

iying Mil 
be M ' 

ipet, V 

»ne, S 

- Julie S 

onroe Ji 

lumgar" 1 ] 

it's rec' 
sd Fr«* 
a," V# 
Mlegri* 

ike's ;'™J 
ence" 
"Suite 






by Marvin L. Horton 

The Natchitoches Northwestern 
Symphony Orchestra, in its eleventh 
season will perform in concert, Friday, 
Dec. 3, at 8:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts 
Auditorium, with Edward A. Rath, 
guest pianist. 

The orchestra is made up of about 7 
members. These musicians are not all 
from the university, but include 
professional students from Shreveport, 
Alexandria, Monroe, Lake Charles, 
Nacogdoches, Tex., and the Nat- 
chitoches area, according to Dr. J. 
Robert Smith, musical director and 
conductor of the Natchitoches- 
Northwestern Symphony. 

The eleventh season opened with a 
pop concert on the riverfront stage 
featuring, Earline Miller and John 
Raush as guest soloists. This orchestra 
has been committed to bringing music 
to youth and other persons in Central 
Louisiana for many years. 

There have been a number of 
distinguished soloists performing over 
the years with this orchestra : Eugenie 
Watson, Gail Carpenter, Edward 
Kilenyi, Sylvia Zaremba, Richard 
Cass, Bunny Curry, Jim Bob Key, and 
Jeanine Smith, said Dr. Smith. 

Dr. Edward A. Rath, the featured 
soloist for this concert, will play "Piano 
Concerto... No. 4 in C Minor" by Camille 
Saint-Saens. 

Dr. Rath began in music at the age of 
eleven in Oklahoma City. He attended 
Indian University where he did ex- 
tensive performing under the guidance 
of the Hungarian pianist and 
pedagogue, Gyorgy Sebok. Dr. Rath 
received both his Master's and Doctor's 
degrees from Indiana University. 



Currently he is associate professor of 
music at NSU and has performed 
concerts and recitals in many 
Louisiana cities. 

During the concert acknowledgement 
of Mrs. H. D. Dear will be made. Mrs. 
Dear, is a prominent piano teacher in 
Alexandria. For the past 15 years Mrs. 
Dear has given piano and string 
students scholarships to Northwestern, 
and for the past ten years contributed to 
the orchestra proceeds for a concerto 
program she presents each spring with 
the Natchitoches-NSU Symphony and 
her students. 

Mrs. Dear has studied with several 
well-known teachers such as Rudolph 
Ganz, Maurice Dumeneil, Edwin 
Jughe, and Leo Podolsky. Mrs. Dear's 
students have received much 
recongition and now serve as university 
teachers, composers, and concert 
artists. 

Letters extending invitation to the 
concert have been sent to Legislators 
and dignitaryies of the state, according 
to Dr. Smith. 

Dr. Smith received his Master of 
Music Degree from the Eastman School 
of Music in Rochester, New York and 
his Doctor of Musical Arts Degree in 
conducting from the University of 
Texas in Austin. Before coming to 
Northwestern in 1965, Dr. Smith was 
band director and orchestra director at 
Byrd High School in Shreveport. 

Some of the selections which will be 
performed by the symphony are 
'"Festive Overture," 'Veccio 
Castello;" "Ballet of the Chicks in 
Their Shells;" and "Schmule." 



Interracial Committee, he was recently 
named to Who's Who in American 
Colleges and Universities. 

The other candidate for Mr. NSU is 
Rodney Wise. He is a pre-med, zoology 
major, and presently serves as 
president of Blue Key Naional Honor 
Fraternity. He was recently named to 
Who's Who in American Colleges and 
Universities. He has served on the 
Current Sauce staff as advertising 
manager in 1975, and as circulation 
manager this year. He has also served 
as treasurer of the Tri-Beta Biological 
Honor Society, and is a member of the 
SUGB Music and Films Committee. 
Wise is also a member of the American 
Chemical Society, Phi Kappa Phi 
Honor Society, Phi Eta Sigma Honor 
Fraternity, the Pre-Med Club and the 
Microbiology-Biochemistry Club. 

Donna King is running for Miss NSU. 
She is a kindergarten- primary-special 
education major. A member of Sigma 
Kappa Sorority, Donna has served as 
pledge class president, assistant second 
vice president, and chapter president 
for the sorority. She served as publicity 
chairman and president for the Purple 
Jacket Club and was a member of the 
Pi Kappa Phi Little Sisters and a 
member of the Rose Court. She holds 
membership in Kappa Delta Pi, Phi 
Kappa Phi, and the Panhellenic 
Council. She was chosen Greek Goddess 
and Outstanding Sorority Woman of the 



Year of 1976. A member of the Student 
Government Association, she was a 
freshman associate and served on the 
campus beautification committee, 
State Board of Appeals, Black Studies 
Committee, the Committee on Com- 
mittees and she served as secretary. On 
the Student Union Governing Board, 
she worked on the decoration com- 
mittee, publicity and hospitality 
committee. She was a member of the 
State Fair Court this year and was 
chosen for Who's Who in American 
Colleges and Universities. 

Sharon Lynn Mack, a speech 
pathology-upper elementary educaiton 
major, is also running for Miss NSU. 
She is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha 
Sorority and has served as dean of 
pledges and reporter. On the Student 
Body Association, Sharon served as a 
senator-at-large and has worked on the 
food services committee and the traffic 
committee. She also served on Big 
Name Entertainment and the 
hospitality committee for the SUGB. 
She was AWS vice president and chair- 
man of the judiciary board. She served 
as president of the United Society, and 
is also involved in the NSU Pom Pom 
line, the Inspirational Choir, and the 
NSU chapter of the NAACP. She is an 
Alpha Phi Alpha Angel and was 
selected for this year's edition of Who's 
Who in American Colleges and Univer- 
sities. 



Final schedule 



Tuesday, December 7, 1976 
8-10:30 a.m. 10MW-" 
12-2:30 p.m. All sections English 100 
and 101 

3 : 30-6 p. m. All English 102 sections 

Wednesday, December 8, 1976 
8-10:30a.m. 8TT 
12-2:30 p.m. 2MWF 
3:30-«p. m. 11 TT 

Thursday, December 9, 1976 
8-10:30 a.m. 8MWF 
12-2:30 p.m. 9:30 TT 

3:30-6 p.m. 12:30 TT 



Friday, December 10, 1976 
8-10:30a.m. 9MWF 
12-2:30 p.m. 3:30TT 
2:30-6 p.m. 1MWF 

Saturday, December 11, 1976 
8-10:30 a.m. 11MWF 
12-2:30 p.m. 2 TT 

3:30-6 p.m. 12MWF 

Monday, December 13, 1976 
8-10:30 a.m. 3MWF 
12-2:30 p.m. 4 MWF 



7 



i 




Co Corner 




Let's review the facts once more 



A couple of years ago, I 
entered the home of a friend 
about 11:30 on Christmas Eve 
night. A generally noisy 
house, I was suprised to hear a 
hush over the place. A 
creature of incurable 
curiousity , I peaked in the 
living room to see a group a 
pajama-clad boys and girls, 
ages 6-10 years, gathered 
around the Nativity scene 
beside a towering decorated 
tree. With the poignant 
composition "For Unto Us A 
Child is Born," from Handel's 
Messiah, playing in the 
background, one of the young 
boys began to read the 
following passage from Luke's 
gospel in the lisping tone only 
an innocent child can possess: 

"And it came to pass in 
those days, that there went out 
a decree from Caesar 
Augustus, that all the world 
should be taxed. 

And all went to be taxed 
every one into his own city. 

And Joseph also went up 
from Galilee, out of the city of 
Nazareth, into Judea, unto the 
city of David, which is called 
Bethlehem; (because he was 
of the house and lineage of 
David:) 

To be taxed with Mary, his 
espoused wife, being great 
with child. 1 

And so it was, that, while 
they were there, the days were 
accomplished she should be 
delivered. 

And she brought forth her 
firstborn son, and wrapped 
him in swaddling clothes, and 
laid him in a manger; because 
there was no room for them in 
the inn. 

And there were in the same 
country shepherds abiding in 
the field, keeping nigh* watch 
over their flock by night. 

And, lo, the angel of the 
Lord came upon them, and the 
glory of the Lord shone around 
about them and they were sore 
afraid. 

And the angel said unto 
them, Fear not: for, behold, I 
bring you good tidings of great 



joy, which shall be to all 
people. 

For unto you is born this day 
in the city of David a Savior, 
which is Christ the Lord. 

And this shall be a sign unto 
you: Ye shall find the babe 
wrapped in swaddling clothes, 
lying in a manager. 

And suddenly there was 
with the angel a multitude of 
the heavenly host praising 
God, and saying, 

Glory to God in the highest 
and on earth peace, good will 
toward men." 

As the youth uttered those 
famous words his voice was 
joined by that of his brothers 
and sisters, raising their 
voices in praise of a miracle 
which changed the world. A 
babe, born in squalored 
poverty, rose to the 
prominence to which He was 
entitled. 

On Christmas Day every 
year, we are given a chance to 
reenact that miracle in our 
hearts as we observe the 
celebration of Jesus Christ's 
birth. 



Appearing this year as the 
opening act for the concert 
will be that funny young man 
from the television program 
"Good Times"-the one and 
only Jimmy "Dynomite" 
Walker. 

The highlight of the concert 
will be the performance of the 
Hamilton, Joe Frank and 
Dennison band. 

Tickets for the concert are 
$4 and may be obtained at the 
door. 

Before you get into your 
books why not plan on joining 
the city, its visitors and fellow 
students in a once a year 
activity which promises to be 
an event one will long 
remember. Remember, the 
big day is Saturday, 
December 4. 



by Stan Tyler 
One of the major issues on 
campus this fall was whether 
or not beer should be sold on 
campus. 

Many rumors have been 
started concerning the stands 
many influencial individuals 
have taken on the issue. 

On Sept. 10, 1976, the Board 
of Trustees For State Colleges 
and Universities passed a 
motion to amend a Board 
policy regarding the sale of 
beer on campuses. The 
amendment reads as follows: 
"All local ordinances, EX- 
CEPT PROXIMTY, regarding 
the sale of beer shall be ob- 
served." 

In an interview with Nat- 
chitoches Mayor DeBlieux, he 
stated he was sympathetic 
with the SGA. He had listened 
to an SGA representative and 
had made a special effort to 



see the NSU Administration. 
But City Ordinance No. 504, 
Sec. 4, Subsection 11, would 
not allow beer to be sold within 
300 feet of any college campus, 
school campus or church. 

According to the Mayor, this 
was the law and he was going 
to enforce. He was not 
motivated by any outside 
pressure but by law. In his 
visit to the NSU campus he 
found the Administration to be 
totally against the issue. 

The City Ordinance reads as 
follows: 

"No retail dealer, nor his 
servant, agent or employee of 
such retail dealer shall: Sell 
beer or intoxicating liquor 
within 300 feet or less distance 
of a building occupied ex- 
clusively as a church or 
synagogue, or public library, 
or public playground, or 
school, except a school for 



business education conducted 
as a business college or 
school." 

President Kilpatrick stated 
he was against the sale of beer 
on campus and always has 
been. He has not changed his 
stand since the beginning. He 
also stated that if any student 
could find a way for this issue 
to enhance education, he 
would approve it. 

The SGA sent the resolution 
to Pres. Kilpatrick and he 
vetoed it. He told the SGA that 
if it came to the point of him 
signing the beer license, he 
would refuse. He could not see 
where it would benefit the 



students and this was his first 
and primary concern. 

TO WHOM IT MAY CON- 
CERN: 

The Board of Trustees for 
State Colleges and Univer- 
sities took the following action 
at its September 10, 1976 
meeting : 

"On motion of Mr. Flory, 
seconded by Mr. Eagan, the 
Board voted to amend Board 
policy to read: 'All local or- 
dinances, EXCEPT 
PROXIMITY, regarding the 



sale of 
observed 
YEAS: 
Colbert, 



beer shall be 



Mrs. Brown, 
Mr. Davies, 



Mr. 
Mr. 



Eagan, Mr. Flory, 
Foreman, Rev. Gordon 
Joubert, Mrs. McHenry 
Peltier. 

NAYS: Mrs. Kirkp^ 
Mr. Nix, Mr. Stafford 
Whetstone. 

ABSTENTIONS: 
Johns 

I certify the foregoing 
a true and correct ejj 
from the minutes of 
meeting of the Boam 
Trustees for State Colleg, 
Universities, Septembei 
1976, said minutes subje, 
ratification at the next n 
meeting of the Board. 

Bill J,, 
Executive Dirj 



Readers comment 



V 4 




This is the last issue of the 
CURRENT SAUCE the 
semester. Finals begin 
December 7 and then the 
semester is over. 

Before we get into studying 
for finals there is an event 
coming up Saturday which I 
am sure few of us will want to 
miss: the fiftieth celebration 
of the Natchitoches Christmas 
Lights Festival. 

The annual parade, 
fireworks display, the official 
lighting, the singing Christ- 
mas tree and, a first, the 
flotilla are all scheduled for 
the day and evening. 

After the lights have been 
turned on, everyone is invited 
over to the Northwestern 
campus to Prather Coliseum, 
to attend the Christmas 
concert sponsored by the 
SUGB. 



"The Indians are coming," 
according to Dr. Hiriam 
Gregory, sponsor of the An- 
thropology Club. 

The annual basket and 
crafts sale by the local Indians 
will be held Saturday, 
December 4 in the Williamson 
Museum from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

This would provide a great 
opportunity to purchase that 
special gift for that hard-to- 
please person. 




An arts and crafts sale will 
be held December 3 and 4 
from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the 
"Old Dranguet House" 
located at 120 Trudeau St., just 
behind DeBlieux and Mc- 
Cain's Hardward Store. 

The sale is sponsored by the 
Beta Kappa chapter of Delta 
Kappa Gamma to help raise 
funds for a scholarship 
foundation. 

Any artist wishing to display 
and sell his works should 
contact Mrs. Nina Magers at 
352-«018. There is a $15 fee and 
the space provided for each 
artist is approximately 10' by 
4'. 



> At 



"4 



Merry Christmas 
and 

Happy New Year 
from the 
Current Sauce 
Staff 




s 



t 

> V 



Dear Miss Oldmixon: 

I am at a loss at trying to 
discern the reason for a total 
lack of response to my visits to 
your campus. As the Marine 
Corps Officer Selection Of- 
ficer for Northern Louisiana I 
am required to let young 
college men and women know 
about the opportunities and 
challenge of being a Marine 
Officer. 

Why are the young people at 
Northwestern State 
University hesitant to talk to 
me? Are they reticent because 
their peers will think less of 
them if they talk to me? Do 
they feel that they have ab- 
solutely no responsiblity to 
serve their country anymore? 
Do they feel that becoming a 
Marine officer is too hard a 
challenge? Do they consider 
that $12,000 is not enough 
starting salary for a college 
graduate? Do they consider 
being a Marine officer a less 
than honorable profession? 

I ask you all these questions 
because they are the ones that 
I ask myself evertime I come 
to your campus, and am 
subjected to what appears to 
be a total— yet, un- 
comprehensible— apathey. I 
was hoping that you would 
concern yourself as a highly 
reputable member of the 
media to somehow find these 
answers for me. If I cannot get 



if 
fl 

I 

: I 




Current Sauce 



COLETTE OLDMIXON 
Editor 



BOB RYDER 
Managing Editor 



BILL BOSSIEP 
Sports Editor 



PAULA JETTON 
News Editor 



OLU AKINRINADE 
Assistant News Editor 

MARK BANDY 
Business Manager 

RODNEY WISE 
Circulation Manager 



RONALD BUZZETTA 
Assistant News Editor 

MARK SMITH 
Advertising Manager 

CRAIG BERTHOLD 
Cartoonist 



1 What's the name for a private 
compartment for making phone 
calls? .4. John Wilkes Booth. B. Phone 
booth. C. Isolation booth. 

2 True or false. You can save up to 
during the week whe t you 
dial long distance the Z+ icay before 
an 8 a.m. class instead of after 

3 What's the best way to get in 
touch with out-of-town friends 
and relatives? A Tie messages to car- 
rier pigeons. B. Dial 1+ long distance 
phone calls. C. Yell real loud. 

4 Tine or false. It 's cheaper to dial 
long distance the 1 + wag Mou- 
dail through Friday from 5 p.m. to 8 
a.m. than it is from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

5 True or false. Person-to-person 
and collect calls always cost more 
than calls you dial yourself the 1 + 
i can. 



6 How can you save your out-of- 
town friends some money? 

A. Give them your phone number so 
they can dial you the 1 + way. B. Stop 
spending iceekends with them. C. Quit 
calling them collect. D. All of the above. 

7 At 5:00 Sunday afternoon, rates 
for dialing 1 + calls: A. Go Up. 

B. Go down. C. Stay the same. 

8 If your budget is overspent again 
and you dial long distance the 
1 + way after 11 p.m. to get more 
money from home, you will: A. Get a 
busy signal. B. Wake up your folks. 

C. Be a smart caller D. Wish you 
hadn 't. 

9 When is the verv cheapest time 
to dial a~l+ call? .4. From 11 p.m. 
to 8 a.m. B. All arekeud until 5 p.m. 
on Sunday. C. Weekdays. 8-5. 



MIKE RABALAIS FAIRHYAMS 
Photographers 

FRANKLIN PRESSON 
Adviser 

Reporters— Muff et Richardson, Marvin Horton, Bob RashJ 
Steve Parsons, Stan Tyler, Charlene Blume, and Ken Landry 





FREEDOM 

OF THE PRESS 



South Central Bell 



Curren' Sauce is 'He official publication of the student body ot 
iNor'hwestern S'ate University in Natchitoches, Louisiana The| 
|newspaper is en'ered as second class matter at the Natchitoches Post 
lOffice under an ac' of March 3, 1879. 

Cur' en* Sauce is published every Tuesday during the fa II and spring | 
■ semesters with the exception of holidays and 'esting periods and bi 
Iweekly during 'he summer semester. 1 1 is printed at the Natchitoches 
lTimes, Highway 1 South. Natchitoches, Louisiana. 

Editorial offices are located in Room 225, Arts and Sciences, 
|Building and telephones are 357 5456 and 357 6874, Business. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are solely those of the 
Is'uden' editors and do not necessarily represent the viewpoint of the | 
{administration, faculty, staff, or student body of Northwestern. 

Letters to the editor are invited and contributions are solicited from 
Is'uden's, facul'y, and staff and from student organizations. Letters 
Imus' be signed and no more than 500 words to be considered for 
|puOlica'ion. Names will be withheld upon request. 

The staff of Curren' Sauce reserves 'he r>gh' to edi* all le'ters tor 
ke of lOurnaiistic style ana available space. 



answers to these questions 
and my next trip to your 
campus remains un- 
productive, I have to cancel 
my visits next semester and 
concentrate my efforts 
elsewhere. 

It appears evident by NSU's 
stunning victory over USL, 
that pride, motivation, and 
determination play an im- 
portant role in campus life. 
NSU has provided outstanding 
Marine Corps Officers in the 
past; I hope it will continue 
that tradition in the future. 
Thank you for your attention 
to this matter. 

Sincerely, 
S. J. Labadie 



(This letter was received by 
the administrator of the 
Northwestern School of 
Nursing. It was passed on to 
this publication because it 
demonstrates one more way 
our educattion pays ) 

This past Monday, October 
4, my wife and daughter 
stopped at the Morrison's 
Cafteria on Old Minden Road 
in Bossier City for lunch. 

My daughter had just been 
released from the Barksdale 
Air Force Base Hospital 
where she had received 
Albumin I.V. treatment while 
on outpatient status. Shortly 
after arriving at the cafeteria, 
my daughter, who is a 
diabetic, began showing 
symptoms of insulin shock and 
within a short period of time 
she was incoherent and in- 
capacitated. 

My wife needed assistance 
and fortunately two of your 



young male student i 
were in the restaurant, 
two young men imrneij 
took charge of the situ 

They carried my da^ 
to the car and while og 
ministered to her the 
drove to the hospitj 
Barksdale. Their quick 
and professional assia 
decreased the immei 
danger to my daughter 
she was in the hosj 
emergency in minimum | 

Other then accepting 
gratitude, David Baker 
Rhiley Venable would at 
nothing else. 

I just don't know h» 
properly express our 
preciation for the effoii 
these two young men 
that we will not readily ( 
their assistance in a tin 
great need. 

I also do not know 
channel or facility that n 
be available within 
school to give 
recognition for their set 
act, but I do know that as 
as we have David Baken 
Riley Venables this ii 
isn't such a bad world i 
all! If these two young | 
are representative of our| 
generation we all have rl 
to look forward to. 

My congratulations to | 
school of nursing. You ) 
selected the best and if e4 
can be of service to the a 
or to David Baker and 1 
Venable, please let me k 
Sini 

Robert M 
Colonel USAFi 



<5 



SGA 

at a glance 



November 15, 1976 

The Northwestern Senate 
was called to order by Bob 
Ryder at 6:40 p.m. November 
15, 1976. Absent was Roque. 

C. Davis discussed the Legal 
Aid contract and Teacher 
Evaluation by students. 
McKellar announced Lady of 
the Bracelet pageant Wed- 
nesday. Dyess discussed 
making movies available for 
commutters to see. Ryder 
announced that Committee on 
Committees report was drawn 
up and would be read at the 
next meeting. 

Chris March of the Home 
Economics department 
requested SGA to sponsor a 
small scholarship to be 
awarded to the Home Ec 
fashion show winner. Page 
moved to make request an 
emergency bill. Nugent 
seconded and motion passed. 
Page moved to award $50 to 
winner of Home Ec fashion 
show. Nugent seconded. 

Roll Call vote as follows: 

Yes: Lane, McKellar, 
Thompson and Reed 

No: Dyess, Johnson, Lynch, 



Ryder, 



Pittard, 
Breland, 

McKinney, Adams, & 
and Cathey 

Abstain: V. Davis, 
Nugent Bill failed. 

C. Davis stated re^ 
"be it resolved that tl< 
does urge and request ft 
to provide adequate W 
around Louisiana Dotf 
Davis moved to accept 
seconded. Motion passe* 

Page discussed 
Warrington in ShreV 
Walker and Gal) 
volunteered to look $ 
ting state and national 

Nugent discussed 
problems and scheM 
reference to cafeteria 1" 
MWF. 

Breland disc" 
Homecoming display 
and problems relate 
Page moved that SGA , 
Dr. Ellis concerning *j 
V. Davis seconded, "T 
passed. i{ 

Lane moved to n 
Nugent seconded. 
adjourned at 7:50 p-" 1 , 
Respectfully su* 
Del*" 
Sen* 1 ' 



SIGMj 

Monday 
girls of 
Christma 
created f< 
their Rot 
The Chrisl 
sent to a 1 

Intram 
elude th( 
bowling. 1 
Nita Hugh 
Gina Dot 
and Lis 
Bordelon, 
Allen, R 
Tommie 1 
Mu in bo 

Thursc 
pledges < 
tives with 
the hou 
presented 
were serv 

Congra 
Sandy, < 
queen. Hei 
very prom 
SI( 

The Sig 
sale Nove 
to 4 p.m. 
parking k 
little bit 
everythini 

A Chris 
held Thur 
mas stocl 
and stuff 
philanthn 

Gi 

What an 
of NSUms 
understand 
the service 
the comr 
university 
Greeks) ai 
any univen 

Brotherh 
is stressed 
according t 
Holloway, 
Inter-Frai 
(TFC) of N! 
of a fratei 
direct invi 
college, he 

New stud 
a complete 
environmc 
sororities t 
new studer 
adjustment 
president 
Sorority C 
make the 
spiring as [ 

Somesti 
high cost 
average ol 
Pledge, si 
Villard. P( 

Twi 

Denise a 
were born 
Denise wai 
before Dia 
in the Air 1 
Air Force I 
Louisiana. 

The two 
twins. The' 




Coupon Special 

K a Buy ONE PIZJ 

Get next size smaller 
FREE! 

(2 PIZZAS FOR THE PRICE OF 1) 
SAME TYPE WITH EQUAL NUMBER OF INGRE^ 




mm \ 



SPuttik 
Denise an 
^ey mai 
toe samei 
toey date 



re 

Mr. Flory, 
i, Rev. Gordon 
Mrs. McHenry 

Mrs. Kirkp^ 
, Mr. Stafford 

e. 

ENTIONS: 

y the foregoing 
ind correct 
e minutes of 

of the Boarj 
for State Colleg, 
ies, September 
I minutes subje, 
)n at the next reg 
jf the Board. 

BillJ, 

Executive Dir, 

fit 

nale student 
the restaurant 
ng men immej 
irge of the situ 
carried my 
ar and while on 
ed to her the 
to the ho spitj 
ile. Their quick 
ifessional assist 
ed the imm« 
:o my daughter 
s in the hoi; 
cy in minimum | 
then accepting 
David Baker 
'enable would at 
else. 

don't know ho 
y express our 
in for the effoj 
o young men. I 
will not readily fi 
iistance in a tin 
ed. 

do not know 
or facility that 
lable within 

to give 
on for their si 
do know that as 
ve David Baken 
enables this rj 
h a bad world i 



Page 3. CURRENT SAUCE. November 30, 1976 



As TTK<£ 



aka ©x ill <*>!>«. z\2.o Mr >s . Dial gets top j ob 

f -m-~*+f%£% I/* §*C /^HIOIII ■ K P ' ms - W - A - Dial of Baton New Orleans, Raymond Ar- directors include Joe 



A Z1>B 



SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA Maine Seacoast Mission. 
Monday and" Tuesday the Congratulations to Donna 
girls of Tri-Sigma sewed King for being nominated and 

in the run-offs for Miss NSU. 



Greek Review 

kah» nr 



Christmas stockings and 
created felt horse heads for 
their Robbie Page project. 
The Christmas goodies will be 
sent to a hospital for children, 
Intramural activities in- 



The new officers for the 
spring and fall of 1977 are 
Michelle Champagne; 
president; Val Scarbro, first 
vice president; Yogi Holt, 
elude the riflery shoot and second vice president; Debra 
bowling. Those shooting were Scott, recording secretary; 
Nita Hughens, Vickie Kitchin, Donna Brumley, treasurer; 
Gina Dobson, Cindy Benson Janet Dasko, rush chairman, 
and Lisa Beazeale. Fran Peggy Gillham, senior 
Bordelon, Dee Villard, Martha panhellenic, Susan 
Allen, Rhonda Maggio and Stephenson, registrar; and 
Tommie Hebert defeated Phi Debbie Rodriguez, 
Mu in bowling. corresponding secretary. 

Thursday, the 18th, the Sunshine of the Week is 
pledges entertained the ac- Patty Harvey; pledge of the 
tives with a surprise party at week is Nanette Hawthorne 
the house. A skit was and active of the week 
presented and refreshments Donna King. 



is 



brothers. Special tribute goes 
out to the "first of all" 
supreme octet members. They 
are Hilton Verrett, Terry 
Holmes, Dock Voorhies, 
Richard Smith, Harry Smith, 
Larry Heard, Floyd White and 
number on Danny "Nikedo" 
Cage. 

The Sphinxmen would like 
to congratulate the Demons on 
their homecoming win. 
Congratulations to big sisters 
Helen Crump and Carol 
Martin for serving on the 
Homecoming Court and 
Charlene Miller, a member of 
the top ten finalists in Lady of 
the Bracelet. Recognition also 
goes to Sharon Mack and 
Hitlon Verrett for being 
nominated for Mr. and Mrs. 



NSU, Tanya Allen, member of 
the homecoming court and 
Edith Harris, one of the top 
ten in Lady of the Bracelet. 
Kappa Alpha 

Gamma Psi Chapter of 
Kappa Alpha recently held 
elections for the officers of I, 
n, and III. The new No. I is 
Charles Dowden. Elected to 
the No. II and No. in posts 
were Luke Manfre and Aron 
Johnson. The Order 
congratulates its new officers 
and is confident in their ability 
to carry on the great southern 
tradition here at Gamma Psi. 

The chapter appreciates the 
excellent performance of its 
outgoing officers. Earl 
Hebert, No. I, Dm Wells, No. 
H, and Pres Hart, No. m, all 



helped make this a banner 
year for Kappa Alpha here at 
Gamma Psi. 

KA had to decline playing in 
the December 3 Charity Bowl 
because of its commitment to 
the Natchitoches Association 
of Retarded Children. This 
date is set aside every year as 
the Order performs a 
Christmas play for the 
children, 

Kappa Alpha Order wishes 
everyone a happy Christmas 
Lights Festival and good luck 
on their finals. 

Congratulations to Bubba 
Philen, Eddie Childers, and 
Greg Spillano on their per- 
formance in the weight lifting. 
Philen received an overall 
first in competition 



Mrs. W.A. Dial of Baton 
Rouge was elected president 
of the NSU Alumni 
Association during the 92nd 
annual Homecoming 
celebration. 

Mrs. Dial, a 1935 graduate of 
NSU who now serves as a 
coordinator of special service 
for the American Bank and 
Trust Company of Baton 
Rouge, succeeds LaSalle 
Parish superintendent of 
schools Dr. Harold Denning as 
the NSU Alumni Association 
president. 

CM. McSwain of Sulphur 
was elected vice-president of 
the association, and Dr. C.B. 
Ellis was elected executive 
secretary and treasurer. 

Elected to the association's 
board of directors were 
William J. Sherman of 
Shreveport, Parker Wiggins of 



New Orleans, Raymond Ar- 
thur of Natchitoches and 
Denning. 

Ed Dranguet, executive 
vice-president of Exchange 
Bank & Trust Company was 
re-elected to continue serving 
as president of the NSU 
Foundation. 

Gen. Erbon W. Wise of 
Sulphur was elected as the 
NSU Foundation's vice- 
president, and Ellis was 
named executive secret- ry 
and treasurer. Chosen a. a 
new member of the Foun- 
dation's board of directors 
du ng the Homecoming 
meeting was Wayne McCullen 
of Natchitoches. 

Other members of the 
Foundation's board of 



directors include Joe Traigle, 
Baton Rouge; Dr. Mixon 
Bankston, Alexandria; 
Clayton Cornish, Dr. Jack 
Gamble, Charles T. Hall and 
Scott Johnson, Shreveport; 
Madison L. Funderburk, 
Houma, and Ed Pierson and 
Stacy Williams, Natchitoches. 

Elected as ex-officio officers 
of the NsU Foundation were 
univeristy president Dr. 
Arnold R. Kilpatrick, NSU 
Alumni Association president 
Mrs. W.A. Dial and J.A. Rock- 
hold of Baton Rouge, CO. 
Holland of Minden, George 
McConathy of Bossier City, 
CM. McSwain of Sulphur, 
Wayne Williamson of Monroe, 
J.C Carlin of Alexandria, 
Michael E. Murphy of 
Metairie and Dudley Downing 
of New Orleans. 



were served afterwards. 

Congratulations go to 
Sandy, our Homecoming 
queen. Her sorority sisters are 
very proud of her. 

SIGMA KAPPA 

The Sigrrias held a Cumtux 
sale November 19 from 9 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. in the Broadmoor 



ALPHA PHI ALPHA 
The Sphinx pledge club held 
a record hop last Thursday 
night at Curley's Lounge. 
They had a most enjoyable 
time and hope to return there 
soon. To share in the 
homecoming spirit the 
Sphinxmen attended the 



Survey indicates student issues 



Cadets get awards 



parking lot. It consisted of "a homecoming game and a 

little bit of the best of party at Natchitoches Central, 

eveiything." On Tuesday, November 16, 

A Christmas party will be 1976 the Theta Chi chapter of 

held Thursday, Dec. 2. Christ- Alpha Phi Alpha celebrated 

mas stockings will be made their thrid anniversary with a 

and stuffed as part of the festive meal and table set up 

philanthropy programs for the in the cafeteria for all their big 

Greeks help students 



While the national pollsters 
concentrated on the political 
elections, a recent survey of 
young people indicates hat 
their primary personal con- 
cerns are jobs, money and 
higher education. When 
questioned on social issues, 
the same group expressed 
little of the concern that 
sparked young people to 
protest during the Viet Nam 
era. 

The survey of 1,200 high 
school and college seniors and 



young working people— all 
between the ages of 17 to 30— 
was conducted by students of 
sociology and marketing at 
Georgia Tech, Howard 
University, University of 
Illinois at Chicago Circle, St. 
Louis University, Rice 



and personal 
followed in that 



friends 
fulfillment 
order. 

On social issues, the views 
of each group varied depen- 
ding on age. While 42 percent 
of the high school seniors said 
their primary concern was 



University, the City College of politics, the figure dropped to 
New York and the University 28 percent for college seniors 



What are Greeks? Students 
of NSU may not have a clear 
understanding of Greeks; and 
the services they perform for 
the community, and the 
university, but they (the 
Greeks) are a vital asset to 
any university. 

Brotherhood and education 
is stressed in all fraternities 
lese two young] accordi ng to Larry (Flowers) 
tentative of ourl HoUowa y> president of the 
>n we all have t^ Inter-Fraternity Council 
orward to (IFC) of NSU - K one is a part 
igratulations tot f a fraternity he will have 
' nursing. You J 4rect involvement with the 

thebestandifej^-h 6 /^- f 

New students are faced with 

a completely new (different) 
environment, however the 
sororities and fraternities help 
new students in making this 
adjustment, said Dee Villard, 
president of Panhellenic 
Sorority Council. We try to 
make the experiences as in- 
spiring as possible, she added. 

Some students believe that a 
high cost is involved. An 
average of $33 is needed to 
pledge, said Holloway and 
Villard. People get the im- 



pression, a high socieity 
prestige is needed to be a part, 
but "this is not true," said 
Holloway. There are a few 
wealthy members, but they do 
not make up the Greeks. 
About 75 percent of the 
Greeks' background family 
status is of the middle class 
bracket, said Holloway. 

Charity pick ups are 
common projects served by 
Greeks. This establishs a 
benefit and service of Greeks 
to the community, said 
Villard. Some activities on 
campus (boxing, arm 



service to the 
vid Baker and 
please let me 
Sin 

Robert M. 
Colonel USAf I 



Each sorority has a 
philanthrophy which they 
work to support, Villard said. 
Greeks aid in the school spirit 

of the university, "we don't 
just party, we do constructive 
things, such as, build floats for 
the Christmas festival, and 
spray rats for the Nat- 
chitoches residents, Villard 
explained. 

Although many persons 
may have negative opinions of 
Greeks. Fraternities and 
Sororities do contribute to the 
university, and to society. 
Greeks possess a good 



of Southern California. 

Here are some of the 
highlights that the survey, 

...Getting into the college of 
their choice was the primary 
concern of nearly 40 percent of 
the high school seniors. 

...As expected, the key 
objective for 51 percent of 
college seniors was to achieve 
high grades to enable them to 

find jobs within the area of percent for the college seniors 
their specilization. and a few scattered votes 

...The under -30 work force among high school seniors, 
put more money (30 percent) Another major surprise of 
as their